Mott’s General Store, Main Street, Lyn

The Credit Ledger from

Blake E. Mott’s General Store, Lyn, Ontario

(Author unknown) (Note: the photo is not of Mott’s Store, unfortunately no photos exist of his store)

Blake Mott and his wife Edith were the proprietors of a General Store in Lyn from about 1921 to 1931. Blake rented the ground floor of the building owned by the International Order of Oddfellows on the main street of Lyn, right next to the present museum.

This ‘Credit Ledger’ covers the time period of March 17th, 1925 to May 26th, 193. On the surface this Ledger records goods and services purchased on credit, but in fact it is a document depicting a social and economic way of life in that era. The 475 pages of purchases tell far more than what the customers bought; it relates how rural folk lived and managed to economically survive in increasingly difficult times. Interest centres not so much on what they bought and the prices, but on how they paid their bills, for that information indicated their financial fluidity and resourcefulness.

The decade of 1920 to 1930 has frequently been referred to as “The Roaring Twenties”, which immediately conjures up images of gay ‘Flappers’ and ‘Great Gatsby’ type figures of enormous wealth and high social standing, living the good life. Well, for the wealthy that might have been true but for the vast majority, especially the working class, which include rural folk, typically those who lived in the Lyn area, life in that decade was one of increasing hardship. There was a boom in the immediate post WW 1 period but as the decade wore on the good times became economically more difficult. The working class experienced ten years of declining income while the wealthy hardly noticed it at all, until the stock market crash of 1929, which caused chaos amongst the upper income group. The Market crash had a domino effect with disproportionate repercussions on the already cash strapped lower income group- which included most of the citizens of Lyn.

The era of the village store is all but gone; a few such stores still exist in outlying communities, but they have a finite life and their imminent demise is dependent upon the economics of transportation. It might be that the reader has a vague idea of what a general store is, and so to clarify, a brief description is in order. Where there was an established community, more likely than not remote, and mobility was restricted, or transportation was expensive, there arose a need for a store where goods, that could not be conveniently or economically produced locally, could be purchased to meet life’s needs. Thus emerged the general store. It was a phenomena that existed from time immemorial to mid 20th century. It was a shop where a vast selection of goods were available, not much variety perhaps, but the key factor was ‘availability’. It was the fore runner to today’s department store complex. The general store also served as a community hub with essential social services and communications being part of its stock in trade.. This tangible ‘other product’ illustrates that ‘Man does not live by bread alone’. Mott’s Store was probably typical of the era in which it existed with a mind boggling inventory roughly divided into ‘departments’ within a small shop. The Ledger records some, but by no means all, of his stock (refer to later pages for a list of items sold). For the average farm wife, living in relative isolation, Mott’s emporium might have seemed to be a material oasis from another planet.

People bought on credit for numerous reasons and not simply because they were short of money; they had small amounts of money but it might not have been available at any given time. Lyn was essentially a farming community where the ‘mill cheque’ was the major source of income and the cheques were issued by the milk factory once per month, meaning that there was no constant flow of money in the community. Like milk, it came in spurts, but at thirty day intervals. People lived from milk cheque to milk cheque, doing as best they could between times. Mott was probably the last link in the local financial chain.

A credit account with Mott was a matter of convenience for some folk who had other mid month priorities for their ready cash. Those people who did not have a steady income would have appreciated the easy credit on food until the next casual job came along. Mott did not charge interest on his accounts, which was the norm for general stores trying to attract and hold customers in a competitive market place. This mutual rust and faith worked well for the most part, with few failing to pay their bills. Payments to him were frequently of small amounts with 10 and 20 cents being common, although most paid off a goodly portion of their account, but rarely the whole lot. They were not able to get ahead of the game, they were in perpetual debt. Many of those in the Ledger obviously were not making a living wage. There is no evidence of how many of Mott’s customers paid in cash for this book is a Credit Ledger.

Mott provided several services aside from provender. He ran a type of taxi service; he also sub-contracted deliveries of heavier items to a truck owner; he was a money lender; he owned a telephone and charged for conveying messages (10¢ each!); he was a middle mn or ‘agent’ for watch repairs; he was a caterer for the Masons; he accepted, in lieu of cash payment on credit accounts, all manner of farm produce (refer to list on a later page), and in addition to all that he was the distributor of “Relief” to those too poor to survive without Township Assistance. In many ways Mott was an extraordinary businessman; astute, flexible, alert to opportunities, adaptable to change, multi-skilled, having an agile mind and being competent in risk assessment. He was an admirable performance given the difficult financial times in which he operated.

Mott became a significant person in the community because he provided so many services. This was probably Mott’s way of staying ahead of the competition, there were four other general stores in the village at that time and the struggle for survival was probably keen. In addition to those four competing stores there was a number of very small stores sprinkled about the countryside; one was run from the converted front parlour of a private house. The number of general stores in Lyn was justified because customers were drawn from approximately a ten mile radius. One of Mott’s customers habitually walked down Halleck’s Road from his house on Highway 2. It is well to bear in mind that Lyn rivalled Brockville for economic dominance at one time.

The Ledger records many times Mott billing church ministers, who did not own a car, for taxi services to funerals or Sunday church services in the distant charges of their respective parishes. A normal day labour rate was about $2.00 was in effect at the time and Mott charged between $2.00 and $2.50 for most trips, which was quite expensive.

Lester Ladd was the owner of a truck and he carried bread and other products for Mott as a sub contractor.

As a money lender Mott was limited. He lent amounts from 20¢ to $100. and charged 7% interest. The normal interest rate at that time was about 4%, but it seems that Mott might have been the ‘lender of last resort’ and hence the extra 3% for the higher risk. He did not do it often but he did provide a financial service, be it ever so humble, for a community that had few alternatives.

The Ledger records many instances when Mott supplied coffee and snacks to the Masons (referred to in the ledger as A.F.& A.M.- and acronym for the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons) when they held their meetings in the rooms above the present day library in Lyn. He contracted to fill the il lamps, clean the meeting rooms, set fires in the winter, wash dishes, provide milk, butter, bread, cookies, fruit cakes and salmon with charges ranging from $4.65 t0 $8.15. Actually it was a local lady defraying her credit account who did the work, and Mott who supplied the goods and took responsibility for the service.

Prior to entering the grocery business Mott was a farmer and he retained ownership of the farm after he opened the store. The ledger records, in 1928, rent of $4.00 per month for the farm house being collected by Eli Mott, a distant relative. Eli must have vacated the house and another tenant moved in for in the back of the ledger a hand written note dated February 24th, 1932, giving two months notice of eviction to the new tenant (name withheld). The ownership of this farm was convenient for Mott because it was a place where customers could ‘trade’ day labour and farm supplies to reduce their credit amount at the store. All parties were happy; no cash changed hands, the credit account decreased and Mott had his farm in better order. Mott might have sold some farm produce to other farmers rather than use it himself. He did purchase a lot of hay and it probably was used for his own cattle. In 1927 Mott sold ‘a year’s pasture for two colts’ to one of his customers for $14.00, a Mr. M.Fodey.

Mott also ‘traded’ with suppliers. The Ledger relates that he exchanged the cost of automobile repairs ($70.33) for a grocery credit of the same amount, with the garage owner, G.R.Stewart. There is also an entry telling that Dr. G.W.Brown was credited $5.00, which was his grocery bill, for inoculating Mott’s daughters four times. Miss Addie McLean, and artist and music teacher, was credited 50¢ for music lessons for Mott’s daughters.

There are occasional entries where people, other than the account owner, paid some amount off an account. An assumption is being made that the account owner was owed money and an indirect payment was made. Two entries note that payments were ‘lent’ money, i.e. money was lent to the debtor but paid directly to Mott, thus relieving Mott of some of the debt.

Hard economic times fostered a system of ‘Relief to the Poor’, ‘Dole, or ‘welfare”. The Ledger shows that The Township of Elizabethtown paid for bread to be distributed by Mott to designated customers. There is no record of who the recipients were (preservation of the individual’s dignity, Mott was sensitive) but there is a record of how much bread was distributed, pages of it. Later on in the decade, as things got worse, bread was supplemented by other basic necessities, Rolled Oats, sugar, butter, milk, beef, soap, tea and bacon.

Mott was not wealthy enough to be immune to the failing economy and despite his various acts of nobleness oblige, he indulged in, what today would seem, a bizarre act. A local man recalls buying ice cream cones from Mott who would lift the ice cream fro the canister with a metal scoop and trim off the excess ice cream from the bottom of the scoop with his jack knife!

The lot of women was shown in the Ledger to be less than good. There seems to be unequal credit for labour in lieu of cash. Mrs. D. Lawson was credited a mere 75¢ for scrubbing the floor of the Masonic Lodge and yet was charged $2.50 for taxi service to visit her husband in the Brockville Hospital. She did other work on the Masonic room and was paid $1.05. A Mrs. LaRue demolished a barn and was credited only $6.00. The accounts that are obviously those of women are all very well managed, with frequent payments and never large sums owing. Life, then, for women, was tough. Edith Mott wife of Blake Mott, more than pulled her weight in the maintenance of the household. Not only was she wife, mother (of four girls), lover, house keeper, store keeper and Post Mistress, but also managed the dining room of Stack’s Hotel.

The amount of money owed on a credit account varied widely from $4.00 or less, to the highest at $186.98 (he did manage to pay it off). Most payments were irregular and small. A prime example of this was one church minister, who despite living quite frugally had an account that perpetually hovered around $73. The frequency of visits to the shop by customers ran from several times a month to three times a day and the purchases indicated that the regulars had poor planning skills. One person returned some ham, excess to their needs, for a 50¢ credit. A man who had an outstanding account of $1.12, ceased coming to the shop and then four years later returned and picked up where he had left off; no interest being charged and no comment recorded. Another man existed on little other than pork and beans, bread and tobacco. It was interesting to note that the boring fare for the average account holder, was spiced up from time to time by small luxury items, despite the lack of money: salmon, ice cram, tropical fruit, maple butter, coconut, ginger snaps, raisins, chocolate, cookies, herbs, spices, herrings and candies. Being typical boosts to the taste buds. An inordinate amount of tobacco was sold at 25¢ a pack; that being very expensive in relation to a day’s wage.

The list of tropical fruits suggested an efficient importing and distribution system was in operation. Fruit could have been shipped from Florida, or the Caribbean, to Montreal and thence by train to Brockville and truck to Lyn.

The listing of perishable items, ice cream in particular, indicates that Mott had a cooling system in the store, Refrigeration as we know it did not come into common use until much late and electricity to run a freezer came into the area only in 1947. A clue is found in the account of Albert (Ab) Cain, a maker of axe handles, where he traded 738 cakes of ice for $12.65 off of his account. The ice cakes, normally 16” square by approximately 12” thick, would have been used in a large wooden ice box type cooler. When awaiting use in the store cooler the cakes were held in a barn at the rear There was snow packed between the cakes of ice and a foot of sawdust all around the inside of the walls acted as insulation. Ice cutting was a difficult and heavy job that separated the men from the boys, meaning that it was a hard won credit.

Midway through 1930 it is evident that fewer customers are coming to the shop and they are buying fewer goods. More ‘trading’ is taking place, meaning less cash flow for Mott. Who has bills to pay in cash. By Christmas the position became intolerable and thus Mott wrote a brief note to his landlords, the IOOF Property Committee, informing them of his intent to quit the premises on January 1st, 1931. it must have been a very difficult note to write, despite its brevity, for it meant that eight years of his efforts, and those of his wife Edith, were in vain.

Gentlemen, Owing to the drop in business and the depression of money, I hereby give you notice of my vacating your store as per agreement, notice taking effect from January 1, 1931.

Respectfully yours, (signature) E.B. Mott”

However there is an entry in the Ledger as late as June 24th, 1931, for goods and services rendered to the Masonic Lodge. So there is a question as to the date of the store closing.

When Mott was running his store in the IOOF building, his wife Edith Mott, who had a reputation as an excellent cook, was running the dinning room of Stack’s Hotel, it being just three doors west of the Mott’s Store. Since Mot had rented his farm house to Eli Mott, Blake was living with his wife Edith and four young girls in rooms above the hotel dining room. When Stack’s Hotel was destroyed by fire in 1928 Mott purchased a house on the corner of Main Street and Lyn Valley Road (39 Main Street). After his store closed Mott was employed by the owners of Billings’ General Store in Lyn. Mott then gained the contract for the Royal Mail in Lyn, the post office at that time was within Billing’s Store. Later the Mott’s left the employ of Billings and moved the Post Office into the IOOF building, in the same place as their old store.

In his obituary in the Recorder and Times, 1945, it was noted that Mott was in business in Lyn until 1937. According to family records, held by Mott’s grandson, Clark Dempsey, Mot was Christened Blake Edward Mott, but on two formal documents, perhaps of a legal nature, he signed his name as E.B. Mott.

Mott was born in Lyn on July 25th, 1881 and died aged 64 in Brockville on January 28th, 1945, he was buried in the Oakland Cemetery. He married Edith Danby in August 1911 and they had four children, Velma, Helen, and twins Doris and Dorothy. Mott was the son of Weldon B. Mott and Marticia Clark. Mott had two brothers, Clark P. Mott of Philadelphia and H.F. Mott, a judge, in Toronto. Mott had an aunt, Bessie Mott, born in Lillies on May 30th, 1853 who died in Brockville on December 5th, 1948, aged 95.

Addendum

The Ledger used for this story starts as of March, 1925 and runs until May, 1931. Several times, at the beginning of the Ledger there is reference to accounts being “Carried from Book #1”, which must have covered the earlier period. That book is not available. The date of Mott opening his store is said to have been 1921, but that is not certain.

The Ledger itemizes a customer’s purchases made at any one time, except for “the weekly supplies” where it is simply listed as “groceries”, which on average, ran from $1.50 to $4.00. The described individual items shed light on a life style and local economy. Where prices are available they are in brackets beside the item. While some prices might appear to be low it ust be remembered that they are in 1925-30 dollars and should be adjusted to reflect the average rural labour’s wage for that era. The prices did not increase much, if at all, during the 1920’s, but real incomes declined, not because a day’s labour was any cheaper, but rather it was increasingly more difficult to find. The dollar value of a day’s labour varied on the task and if the labourer supplied machinery and horses, but simply for a man without machinery anywhere from $2.00 to $2.50 for an eight hour day seemed to be the norm, that’s about 31¢ per hour.

Mott’s general store was small and the number of items he carried must have been enormous, meaning that they probably were jammed in where ever a space was available. To give the reader the impression of the controlled chaos that must have existed the items have been listed in a random fashion.

Meat @ 30¢ a pound

Bread 10¢ a loaf

Herrings 20¢

Sausages @ 20¢ a pound

Soap 9¢

Raisins 18¢

Lemons 6 for 20¢

Corn Flakes 13¢ a box

Life Savers 5¢

Ice Cream 25¢

Cabbage 10¢

Peanut Butter 25¢

Hair net 10¢

Horse Blanket $4.00

Chick Feeds 4 lbs for 25¢

Glass Sealers 12 for $1.40

Caster Oil 20¢

Overalls $2.00

Corn Starch 13¢

Tea 65¢

Packet of Seeds 10¢

Clothes pins 2 doz. 15¢

Laces 5¢ & 15¢

Nutmeg 6 for 5¢

Honey 5 lbs $1.00

Icing Sugar 1 lb for 10¢

Prunes 25¢

Vanilla 10¢

Coat $4.00

Shirt $1.25

Salmon 45¢

Lettuce 5¢

Gloves $1.00

Yeast Cakes 8¢ each

Coffee 1/2 lb 40¢

Scribbler 5¢

Aspirin 25¢

Corn Syrup 1 lb 10¢

Water Mellon 10¢

Skein of Yarn 25¢

Gillett Lye 15¢

Salt 100 lbs $1.40

Bugg Lantern $2.00

Fly Swatter 15¢

Coca 30¢

Ammonia 10¢

Berries 1 box 18¢

Pineapple 20¢

Envelopes 10¢

Fly Paper 10¢

Broom 75¢

Milk 1 pint 5¢

Easter Eggs 5¢ each

Boots $4.25

Sateen 2.75 yards 83¢

Dates 18¢

Flour 100 lbs $4.75

Blueing 7¢

Dutch Cleanser 13¢

Bon Ami 15¢

Cornstarch 13¢

O’Henry Bar 10¢

Magazines 60¢

Macaroni 2 lbs 25¢

Talcum Powder 25¢

Sardines 25¢

Sugar 100 lbs $7.50

Axle Grease 50¢

Axe Handle 50¢

Cookies 1 lb 30¢

Jam 1 jar 65¢

Eggs 1 doz 30¢

Jelly Rolls 20¢

Flash Light $2.00

Paint 1 Gal $5.00

Mott also accepted other items in lieu of cash as payment against credit accounts. Some examples are:

Day Labour was at various dollar values, depending upon the task and if a horse or equipment was supplied. Tom Pettem was credited $8.00 for 2 day’s labour and for that he supplied a machine and a team of horses. Eli Mott, a relative, was credited $2.00 for a days assistance in the store. Seymore Cromwell was credited $9.00 for three day’s labour at fencing. Ed Braut worked eight days for $10.00.

Fire Wood was credited by the cord, or the load. A. Bolton received $3.50 per cord and $4.00 a cord for Tom Pettem. In 1922 two cords were valued at $9.00. Orval Brundige supplied two cords of slab wood for $4.50. Harry Leader traded 5 gallons of syrup for $8.75 and $10.86 for an unknown quantity of fire wood.

J.Bolin traded milk for most of his purchases, 80¢ for 10 quarts was typical, in fact he traded so much milk he was oft times in a credit position.

Joseph Young benefited by 15¢ for fish

Lester Ladd was credited 25¢ for carting 50 loaves of bread.

Walter Jarvis profited by $1.50 for two loads of earth.

Vincent Mercier traded a calf skin for 65¢ and another for 80¢

A number of customers brought in eggs, 10¢ a cozen, and home made butter

In season berries were a popular trading commodity.

Potatoes by the bushel were recorded a number of times.

Joe Bolin was credited 10¢ a pound for 113 pounds of beef

Walter Gardiner was given 10¢ a pound for 115 pounds of beef.

Jos. Mott was credited $20.61 for a heifer

Bryce Moore provided five cedar posts for a credit of $12.50

Charles Herbison did some blacksmithing for $6.90

Albert Cain gained $12.65 for cutting 738 cakes of ice.

Following is a listing of customer names as they appeared in the Ledger between March, 1925 and May, 1931. It reads like a who’s who of Lyn.

 

A.F.&A.M. Gardiner, G.W. Mercier, Vincent
Andress, Chas Gardiner, Stanley Miller, Robert
Andress, S. Gardiner, Walter Molt, G.P.
Armstrong, Vera B.,Miss Gibson, Roy Moore, Curson
Beach, Ralph Green, Clarence Moore, Joel
Bolin, Joe Hamilton, J. Moorree, Bryce
Bolton, A. Hamilton, J., Miss Mott, Arnold
Booth, Ed Heffernan, Edmund Mott, Eli
Bowman, George Hendry, Hilbert Mott, Geo. P.
Brant, Ed. Herbison, Charles Mott, Geo. P.
Brown, G.W., Dr. Herbison, Frank Mott, Jos.
Brundige, Orval Herbison, H. Murphy, Lance
Bufelt, Ed. Hodge, Kenneth Neddo, W.
Bushfield, Archie Hull, Mrs. Nixon, Vfred
Cain, A. Hunter, B. Nunn, Clifford
Cain, Ernie Imerson, O. Nunn, Clifford
Cain, Ourine Jackson, George Pergau, Geo., Mrs.
Cain, Victor Jarvis, Walter Pergau, Helen, Mrs.
Cdonovan, Paddy Jenkinson, James Pettem, Harold
Chant, Frank Johnston, William Pettem, Leonard
Charlton, M. Jowett, Arnold Pettem, Luella
Chisamore, Willie Ladd, Authur Pettem, Tom
Clow W.J. Ladd, Lester Reid, George
Clow, John LaRue., Mrs. Robinson, Rev.
Clow, W. Lawson, Bun Runnett, Fred
Coby, James Lawson, Harmon, Jr. Russell, Lester
Comyn, William Lee, N. Seymore, Cromwell
Cromwell, R. Leeder, John Shane, Richard
Dailey, Mrs. Lennox, Ernie Simpson, Jas.
Darling, Ian Lennox, Mrs. Simpson, John
Darling, Sanford Lowry, Mrs. Slack, Frank
Davis, Ed Mallory, Ira Smith, Ambrose
Delve, Rev. Marshall, Harry Square, John
Dison, Dixon Marshall, James Stafford, Frank
Dollan, Gordon May, William Steacy, John
Dowdell, Rev. McElroy, Stanley Stewart, Jack
Dumont, Orval McLean, Addie, Miss Teskey, Rev.
Earle, Leland McNamara, Hav. Truesdale, C.
Edgley, James McNamara, John, Sr. Truesdale, William
Edgley, Mrs. Dar McNish, Fred Vanattan, Geo. & Sid
Edmunds, Mr. McNish, Harris Watson. Chas
Elizabethtown Twp. Webster, Earl
Fodey, M. Young, Jas. jr.
Young, Jos. Sr.
Young, William Sr.

Christ United Church, Lyn

Christ Church Lyn…Now The United Church, by Walter K. Billings

The Presbyterians of the Lyn district held their first service in the ball-room of the Brownton Hotel. It was conducted by the Rev. William Smart, who was one of the pioneers of religion. A Sunday school was organized by Mr. Smart and Adiel Sherwood, who was sheriff of Brockville. Services were held occasionally in the Methodist Church and later in Pergau’s Hall, until a church was built.

Pergau Building c1975

Lyn congregation was only a mission until 1855. Rev. William Smart arrived in Brockville in October 1811 and commenced his ministerial labours there, extending them to Yonge and Augusta. After Mr. Smart left, the ministerial services were conducted by the Rev. Mr. McMurray and later by Rev. J.K. Smith of Brockville. The first minister of Lyn was the Rev. Robert McKenzie, who remained from July 5, 1859 until 1862. He was succeeded by the Rev. John Burton, who was called to Prescott February 4, 1868, and later to the Northern Congregational Church in Toronto. Then for six years the Presbyterians were without a settled minister, until the year 1874, when the Rev. Archibald Brown was called and settled here.

The Lyn section of the Presbyterian congregation resolved in the autumn of 1874 tom build a church, the work being started in April, 1875. The donor of the building site to the Presbyterian Church was James Cassels, M.D. of Quebec. Robert Cassels was chairman. The building committee was composed of James Cumming, Chairman, Robert Bryson, Treasurer, John Halliday, James Bulloch, James Hamilton, Archie Davidson, Peter Purvis and John McNish. The architect was W.G.Thomas of Montreal, contractors were Hugh McKay and Joshua Franklin, the mason and plasterer William Whitton and carpenter Edwin Bagg. The building was to be of stone in Gothic Style. The auditorium was to be sixty by thirty-four feet, the vestry in the rear was to be ten by sixteen feet, and the tower fourteen by fourteen feet. The total cost was to be about four thousand dollars.

On Friday, May 7, 1875, the cornerstone was laid by the Rev. William Smart, assisted by the Rev. Archibald Brown Rev. James Hastie of Prescott and the Rev. John Burton of Belleville. Copies of “The Brockville Recorder”, “The Weekly Monitor”, Montreal and Toronto newspapers and the current coins of the Dominion were deposited in the stone.

The tower, at first, was about the height of the main roof, but later was completed to its present height by Joseph Hudson, a stone mason of Lyn. At first, the choir seats were arranged just inside the church, with a space in the centre for the small organ then in use. My first recollection of the interior of the church was the choir seats. These with the little organ placed directly below the stained glass window and the organist facing the entrance met your gaze as you entered the church. The aisle behind the pews separated the choir from the congregation. These seats are still there, but the space taken by the organ has been filled in. Sometimes when there was an evening service, the younger boys occupying these were a disturbing element to the minister.

The congregation was seated facing the pulpit, with their backs to the choir. The pulpit, a wonderful piece of cabinet making, was built by Mr. John McNish, an uncle of the late George A. McNish, and brother of his father, James McNish. Some years later the choir was moved to chairs behind the pulpit and another organ was installed. Then the Board of Managers decided that a pipe organ should be bought. This always seemed an unwise move to many of the Presbyterian congregation. A second-hand organ filled the choir loft completely, except fora narrow passage at one side, where the pumper could squeeze in to the long lever at the back of the organ, get off his coat and work the twelve foot shaft up ad down until the bellows was full of air. If you got too much pressure, one of the pipes would whistle. This disturbed the congregation, and did not ad to the solemnity of the service. Later the bellows would start leaking air; then someone would have to take off the front panels, crawl in and try to locate the leak.

It was a hard job to pump the organ. A pumper was usually hired to do this work but after a few services he would quit. Then one of the younger members of the congregation would volunteer to do the next pumping, but usually that member was not on hand the next Sunday and another was asked to pump. An amusing incident happened one night, when a special meeting of the congregation had been called for some purpose or other. At the end of the meeting the minister announced a closing hymn. The organist, Mrs. Ernest Cumming, pressed on the keys, but no sound came. She tried again. Still no air. Then she slid off the stool, walked to the end of the organ and looked back into the narrow passage. There sat the pumper, braced with his back to the wall and fast asleep! The congregation, by this time very quiet, heard her, in a stage whisper call. “Tommy! Tommy! Give us some air!” Tommy woke and grasping the lever, pumped. Each stroke of the lever hit the side and bottom of the slot that the lever worked in. The pumper explained that he had been at a party the night before, to account for his condition. He writer did his share of pumping, and felt a great relief when the old organ was removed and an electric organ installed.

During the pastorate of the Rev. C.E.A. Pocock, new acetylene lights were secured These gave a splendid light, except for an occasional whistle when a bit of an obstruction in the burner meant getting out the stepladder, placing it under the offending light and turning off the valve in the pipe. Meanwhile the minister waited.

After the passing of Mrs. Cumming, first wife of Mr. James Cumming, he presented a marble baptismal fount to the church in memory of his wife. The minister at that time, Rev. J.J. Wright, boarded with the caretaker of the church, Mrs. John Armstrong. Her two youngest boys, Allan and Robert, had, a few Sundays previously witnessed a baptism. They had just been presented with a lovely collie pup, and decided that it should be baptized. Securing some water, they poured it into the font and were just about in the act of immersing the pup’s head when the church door opened and the minister walked in and stood looking, as they thought, directly at them. Keeping quiet, they finally got down behind the font and waited. The pup whined a little but evidently the visitor did not hear him. He finally turned and walked out to the street. That night the boys were late for tea, having decided to keep out of sight until Mr. Wright had left to make a call. Expecting to get a lecture from their mother they walked in, but no mention of the incident was made. They decided Mr. Wright was a good sport and would not tell or else he had not seen them. I asked the lads many years later what they were going to name their pup. They said, “Lucky”.

Presbyterian Church, Perth St. Lyn c1905

The seats in the church at first were built in lengths that extended from the aisles at each side. Usually two and sometimes three families occupied one seat. If you were late for church you had to push past the family occupying the end of the seat. Later on it was decided that the seats should be rearranged. Messrs. Archie and James Greer did this work. Some of the seats were cut in two, the end cut at a bevel, new ends of ash put on, each seat given additional lip to make it wider, and the aisles moved to their present location. Each short pew was fastened to the side wall. This provided a splendid arrangement, as a small family could use one of these. Then the members drew lots to get their pew.

During Mr. Pocock’s pastorate the Board of Managers decided a furnace was necessary, as the old chimneys built in the walls of the church were leaking and the stoves in use did not give enough heat. A furnace man who was consulted advised making a passage from the back of the cellar, removing earth enough to go through with wheelbarrows and excavating for the furnace room a space ten feet square and ten feet deep. Also, at this time, an outside chimney was built from the ground. A cement floor was laid in the furnace room with a three foot cement wall enclosing it. When the furnace was put in it proved very satisfactory except that there was no drainage, and one day after a heavy rain we found some water on the floor.

The Managers arranged to have a ditch dug from the pond to this spot, but some said the cellar was too deep and was lower than the pond itself. We finally put a level on, and having proved that we had six feet of fall, we started to dig the ditch. It was Saturday night, the men were now under the building, and the work went more slowly. It started to rain, but at six o’clock quitting time the men were about five feet from the furnace room. When I went into the cellar about seven o’clock there was a foot of water on the floor. After consulting the minister, as I knew we could have no fire if we could not get rid of the water, I went out to see one of the men who had been working on the ditch, but he would not come back. Then I again went back to the basement. There in the water stood our minister, Mr. Pocock, with a pair of rubber boots on! He had made a trough reaching to the unfinished ditch. There, dipping with a pail and pouring the water into the trough, he declared that it was not going to beat him, and he would have a fire in that furnace before the morning. I hastened down the street, called Mr. James Cumming on the telephone and told him what our minister was doing. He called back. “I’ll tend to that!” and in half and hour he had four of his men with rubber boots on finishing the drain. Then he ordered Mr. Peacock to go home and prepare his sermon, while he stayed to see what the men started. Of course we had a service the next day.

Fourteen years after Church Union in 1939, it was decided to excavate and put a Sunday School room under the main floor. A contract was let and the work started. Six or seven feet of earth had to be removed by wheelbarrow before anything else could be done, then the basement walls were found to extend just four feet below the floors. A bit of skilful engineering then was started. Workmen would measure off eight feet in length of the basement wall, then remove all the earth under the wall for four feet, build in the stone and cement foundation, and pass on eight feet further, taking out another four feet of earth. This was continued all around the foundation. Every precaution was taken not to disturb the upper walls, with such success that not a crack developed. After hundreds of tile had been laid from wall to wall and connected with the original drain to the pond, cinders were spread over the cleared ground. A cement top was laid over this and finally wooden floors were put down. The furnace was rebuilt, another entrance opened behind the tower into the Sunday school room and the work was all completed in the stipulated time. I have seen many difficult contracts executed, but the building of the walls under the old foundation was a feat worthy of mention.

For a small village church our United Church in Lyn has unusually beautiful windows. The largest one, the Cassels memorial window, was installed when the church was built. Representing Jesus, the Light of the World, it is a beautiful piece of work in an arched opening, about twelve feet high and eight feet wide. The McDonald window, behind the pulpit, over the choir seats, also distinctive for its rich, glowing colours was likewise installed when the church was built in 1875. No more memorial windows were given until February, 1944, Mr. T.J. Storey put in a window in memory of his wife. In May, 1945 another was given to the church in memory of Mr. Clayton Taylor by Mrs. Taylor and her daughter, Mrs. Josephine Taylor Macdonald. In June, 1945, two more were given; one in memory of James Cumming by his family and another in memory of the Stewart and Morrison families by Hon. H.A. Stewart, KC of Brockville. After the death of Mr. T.J. Storey, a window in his memory was given by his daughter Mrs. Douglas Cole and her husband in May 1949. Following this in February, 1952, Mrs. F.W. Moffatt gave another stained glass window in memory of her parents Mr. And Mrs. James McNish.

Other valuable and beautiful gifts have been made to Christ Church in Lyn at various times. A communion table was given in 1920 by Mrs. Horton Rowsom and her brothers and sisters in memory of their father and mother, Mr. And Mrs. David Thompson. In January 1950, the children of Mr. And Mrs. James Neilson gave silver offering plates in memory of their parents. In 1939 when the church was renovated, new electric fixtures were presented by Dr. Gordon Richards of Toronto in memory of his father and mother, Rev. J.J. and Mrs. Richards.

Now I shall close with a final word about the ministers who have served our church over the years. After Rev. Archibald Brown, already mentioned, came Rev. J.J. Richardss, Rev. J.J. Wright, Rev. Charles Daly, Rev. C.E.A. Pocock, Rev. D.M. McLeod, Rev. A.W. Gardiner and Rev. W.T. McCree. In 1925 with Church Union it was decided that the United congregation should worship in the former Methodist Church, and this plan was followed until 1939. During those year our minister were Rev. F.G. Robinson, Rev. R.A. Delve and Rev. A.S. Doggett, under whose leadership the congregation in 1939 moved back to Christ Church which was redecorated and renovated. The large bell from the Methodist Church was brought over and placed in position in the tower where it still calls the congregation to worship. In 11940 Rev. H.B. Herrington succeeded Mr. Doggett and in July 1942, Rev. C.K. Mathewson came to the congregation where he and his sister, Miss Nan Mathewson, still ably minister.

 

Interior of the Presbyterian Church c1905

 

Rev. Charles Daly

 

Original Methodist Church, Main St. West, Lyn

 

 

 

Christ United Church, Lyn

Now The United Church

by Walter Billings

Pergau Building Lyn c1975

The Presbyterians of the Lyn district held their first service in the ball-room of the Brownton Hotel. It was conducted by the Rev. William Smart, who was one of the pioneers of religion. A Sunday school was organized by Mr. Smart and Adiel Sherwood, who was sheriff of Brockville. Services were held occasionally in the Methodist Church and later in Pergau’s Hall, until a church was built.

Lyn congregation was only a mission until 1855. Rev. William Smart arrived in Brockville in October 1811 and commenced his ministerial labours there, extending them to Yonge and Augusta. After Mr. Smart left, the ministerial services were conducted by the Rev. Mr. McMurray and later by Rev. J.K. Smith of Brockville. The first minister of Lyn was the Rev. Robert McKenzie, who remained from July 5, 1859 until 1862. He was succeeded by the Rev. John Burton, who was called to Prescott February 4, 1868, and later to the Northern Congregational Church in Toronto. Then for six years the Presbyterians were without a settled minister, until the year 1874, when the Rev. Archibald Brown was called and settled here.

The Lyn section of the Presbyterian congregation resolved in the autumn of 1874 tom build a church, the work being started in April, 1875. The donor of the building site to the Presbyterian Church was James Cassels, M.D. of Quebec. Robert Cassels was chairman. The building committee was composed of James Cumming, Chairman, Robert Bryson, Treasurer, John Halliday, James Bulloch, James Hamilton, Archie Davidson, Peter Purvis and John McNish. The architect was W.G.Thomas of Montreal, contractors were Hugh McKay and Joshua Franklin, the mason and plasterer William Whitton and carpenter Edwin Bagg. The building was to be of stone in Gothic Style. The auditorium was to be sixty by thirty-four feet, the vestry in the rear was to be ten by sixteen feet, and the tower fourteen by fourteen feet. The total cost was to be about four thousand dollars.

On Friday, May 7, 1875, the cornerstone was laid by the Rev. William Smart, assisted by the Rev. Archibald Brown Rev. James Hastie of Prescott and the Rev. John Burton of Belleville. Copies of “The Brockville Recorder”, “The Weekly Monitor”, Montreal and Toronto newspapers and the current coins of the Dominion were deposited in the stone.

Presbyterian Church Lyn c1905

The tower, at first, was about the height of the main roof, but later was completed to its present height by Joseph Hudson, a stone mason of Lyn. At first, the choir seats were arranged just inside the church, with a space in the centre for the small organ then in use. My first recollection of the interior of the church was the choir seats. These with the little organ placed directly below the stained glass window and the organist facing the entrance met your gaze as you entered the church. The aisle behind the pews separated the choir from the congregation. These seats are still there, but the space taken by the organ has been filled in. Sometimes when there was an evening service, the younger boys occupying these were a disturbing element to the minister.

The congregation was seated facing the pulpit, with their backs to the choir. The pulpit, a wonderful piece of cabinet making, was built by Mr. John McNish, an uncle of the late George A. McNish, and brother of his father, James McNish. Some years later the choir was moved to chairs behind the pulpit and another organ was installed. Then the Board of Managers decided that a pipe organ should be bought. This always seemed an unwise move to many of the Presbyterian congregation. A second-hand organ filled the choir loft completely, except fora narrow passage at one side, where the pumper could squeeze in to the long lever at the back of the organ, get off his coat and work the twelve foot shaft up ad down until the bellows was full of air. If you got too much pressure, one of the pipes would whistle. This disturbed the congregation, and did not ad to the solemnity of the service. Later the bellows would start leaking air; then someone would have to take off the front panels, crawl in and try to locate the leak.

It was a hard job to pump the organ. A pumper was usually hired to do this work but after a few services he would quit. Then one of the younger members of the congregation would volunteer to do the next pumping, but usually that member was not on hand the next Sunday and another was asked to pump. An amusing incident happened one night, when a special meeting of the congregation had been called for some purpose or other. At the end of the meeting the minister announced a closing hymn. The organist, Mrs. Ernest Cumming, pressed on the keys, but no sound came. She tried again. Still no air. Then she slid off the stool, walked to the end of the organ and looked back into the narrow passage. There sat the pumper, braced with his back to the wall and fast asleep! The congregation, by this time very quiet, heard her, in a stage whisper call. “Tommy! Tommy! Give us some air!” Tommy woke and grasping the lever, pumped. Each stroke of the lever hit the side and bottom of the slot that the lever worked in. The pumper explained that he had been at a party the night before, to account for his condition. He writer did his share of pumping, and felt a great relief when the old organ was removed and an electric organ installed.

During the pastorate of the Rev. C.E.A. Pocock, new acetylene lights were secured These gave a splendid light, except for an occasional whistle when a bit of an obstruction in the burner meant getting out the stepladder, placing it under the offending light and turning off the valve in the pipe. Meanwhile the minister waited.

After the passing of Mrs. Cumming, first wife of Mr. James Cumming, he presented a marble baptismal fount to the church in memory of his wife. The minister at that time, Rev. J.J. Wright, boarded with the caretaker of the church, Mrs. John Armstrong. Her two youngest boys, Allan and Robert, had, a few Sundays previously witnessed a baptism. They had just been presented with a lovely collie pup, and decided that it should be baptized. Securing some water, they poured it into the font and were just about in the act of immersing the pup’s head when the church door opened and the minister walked in and stood looking, as they thought, directly at them. Keeping quiet, they finally got down behind the font and waited. The pup whined a little but evidently the visitor did not hear him. He finally turned and walked out to the street. That night the boys were late for tea, having decided to keep out of sight until Mr. Wright had left to make a call. Expecting to get a lecture from their mother they walked in, but no mention of the incident was made. They decided Mr. Wright was a good sport and would not tell or else he had not seen them. I asked the lads many years later what they were going to name their pup. They said, “Lucky”.

The seats in the church at first were built in lengths that extended from the aisles at each side. Usually two and sometimes three families occupied one seat. If you were late for church you had to push past the family occupying the end of the seat. Later on it was decided that the seats should be rearranged. Messrs. Archie and James Greer did this work. Some of the seats were cut in two, the end cut at a bevel, new ends of ash put on, each seat given additional lip to make it wider, and the aisles moved to their present location. Each short pew was fastened to the side wall. This provided a splendid arrangement, as a small family could use one of these. Then the members drew lots to get their pew.

During Mr. Pocock’s pastorate the Board of Managers decided a furnace was necessary, as the old chimneys built in the walls of the church were leaking and the stoves in use did not give enough heat. A furnace man who was consulted advised making a passage from the back of the cellar, removing earth enough to go through with wheelbarrows and excavating for the furnace room a space ten feet square and ten feet deep. Also, at this time, an outside chimney was built from the ground. A cement floor was laid in the furnace room with a three foot cement wall enclosing it. When the furnace was put in it proved very satisfactory except that there was no drainage, and one day after a heavy rain we found some water on the floor.

The Managers arranged to have a ditch dug from the pond to this spot, but some said the cellar was too deep and was lower than the pond itself. We finally put a level on, and having proved that we had six feet of fall, we started to dig the ditch. It was Saturday night, the men were now under the building, and the work went more slowly. It started to rain, but at six o’clock quitting time the men were about five feet from the furnace room. When I went into the cellar about seven o’clock there was a foot of water on the floor. After consulting the minister, as I knew we could have no fire if we could not get rid of the water, I went out to see one of the men who had been working on the ditch, but he would not come back. Then I again went back to the basement. There in the water stood our minister, Mr. Pocock, with a pair of rubber boots on! He had made a trough reaching to the unfinished ditch. There, dipping with a pail and pouring the water into the trough, he declared that it was not going to beat him, and he would have a fire in that furnace before the morning. I hastened down the street, called Mr. James Cumming on the telephone and told him what our minister was doing. He called back. “I’ll tend to that!” and in half and hour he had four of his men with rubber boots on finishing the drain. Then he ordered Mr. Peacock to go home and prepare his sermon, while he stayed to see what the men started. Of course we had a service the next day.

Fourteen years after Church Union in 1939, it was decided to excavate and put a Sunday School room under the main floor. A contract was let and the work started. Six or seven feet of earth had to be removed by wheelbarrow before anything else could be done, then the basement walls were found to extend just four feet below the floors. A bit of skilful engineering then was started. Workmen would measure off eight feet in length of the basement wall, then remove all the earth under the wall for four feet, build in the stone and cement foundation, and pass on eight feet further, taking out another four feet of earth. This was continued all around the foundation. Every precaution was taken not to disturb the upper walls, with such success that not a crack developed. After hundreds of tile had been laid from wall to wall and connected with the original drain to the pond, cinders were spread over the cleared ground. A cement top was laid over this and finally wooden floors were put down. The furnace was rebuilt, another entrance opened behind the tower into the Sunday school room and the work was all completed in the stipulated time. I have seen many difficult contracts executed, but the building of the walls under the old foundation was a feat worthy of mention.

For a small village church our United Church in Lyn has unusually beautiful windows. The largest one, the Cassels memorial window, was installed when the church was built. Representing Jesus, the Light of the World, it is a beautiful piece of work in an arched opening, about twelve feet high and eight feet wide. The McDonald window, behind the pulpit, over the choir seats, also distinctive for its rich, glowing colours was likewise installed when the church was built in 1875. No more memorial windows were given until February, 1944, Mr. T.J. Storey put in a window in memory of his wife. In May, 1945 another was given to the church in memory of Mr. Clayton Taylor by Mrs. Taylor and her daughter, Mrs. Josephine Taylor Macdonald. In June, 1945, two more were given; one in memory of James Cumming by his family and another in memory of the Stewart and Morrison families by Hon. H.A. Stewart, KC of Brockville. After the death of Mr. T.J. Storey, a window in his memory was given by his daughter Mrs. Douglas Cole and her husband in May 1949. Following this in February, 1952, Mrs. F.W. Moffatt gave another stained glass window in memory of her parents Mr. And Mrs. James McNish.

Other valuable and beautiful gifts have been made to Christ Church in Lyn at various times. A communion table was given in 1920 by Mrs. Horton Rowsom and her brothers and sisters in memory of their father and mother, Mr. And Mrs. David Thompson. In January 1950, the children of Mr. And Mrs. James Neilson gave silver offering plates in memory of their parents. In 1939 when the church was renovated, new electric fixtures were presented by Dr. Gordon Richards of Toronto in memory of his father and mother, Rev. J.J. and Mrs. Richards.

Now I shall close with a final word about the ministers who have served our church over the years. After Rev. Archibald Brown, already mentioned, came Rev. J.J. Richardss, Rev. J.J. Wright, Rev. Charles Daly, Rev. C.E.A. Pocock, Rev. D.M. McLeod, Rev. A.W. Gardiner and Rev. W.T. McCree. In 1925 with Church Union it was decided that the United congregation should worship in the former Methodist Church, and this plan was followed until 1939. During those year our minister were Rev. F.G. Robinson, Rev. R.A. Delve and Rev. A.S. Doggett, under whose leadership the congregation in 1939 moved back to Christ Church which was redecorated and renovated. The large bell from the Methodist Church was brought over and placed in position in the tower where it still calls the congregation to worship. In 11940 Rev. H.B. Herrington succeeded Mr. Doggett and in July 1942, Rev. C.K. Mathewson came to the congregation where he and his sister, Miss Nan Mathewson, still ably minister.

 

Interior of the Presbyterian Church c1905

 

Rev. Charles Daly

 

Original Methodist Church, Main St. West Lyn

 

 

 

Our Village – A short history of Lyn

by Walter K. Billings

My first recollection of Lyn was about the year 1876. Word had come to the farm that the many cords of tanbark piled on what was afterwards the ball grounds was on fire. I was too young to go to Lyn that night and could only stand in our yard and see the smoke and tongues of flame shooting skyward. Tanbark was used in the tanneries in the village, and the loss of this bark was a serious blow. It was ground and placed in vats, the hides were thrown in, and water poured on them. However, the burning of the bark compelled the tanneries to close down and I do not remember that they ever operated again.

Lyn Mill Pond

Lyn about that time was a thriving village. A saw mill, fed from the pond behind the stores and through the by-wash besides the post office, consisted of an upright saw driven by an over-shot water wheel and was managed by men by the name of Armstrong, Jerry and Robert. Another mill near the flour mill was operated by a Mr. Weeks and Norman Field, who operated a cheese factory in the summer.

There was a woolen mill under the hill also, which a Mr. Burris had charge of, and carriage and paint shop behind the building that housed the fire engine. The latter was in charge of Henry Storey, and the former run by a Mr. Wilson. Before I was fifteen, these firms were all out of business, largely because of the failure of the water power.

My school days, divided between the Howard school and later the Lyn school, where I had as chums Maurice Brown, Ernie Gardiner, Jack Halliday, Trevor Grout and Byron Haskin, were very pleasant memories. The teachers were anxious that we get through the Entrance and on to the Brockville High School, and I think we all did our best at the examinations. But the Horton School (in Brockville) at that time was no place to go to write. I remember I was so cold at this December examination that I could hardly hold my pen, much less do anything worth while at answering the questions. I think Trevor Gout, my desk-mate at school, later judge Grout of Brampton, was the only one who passed.

The next summer I was working hard to try again when I had to leave school and go to work on the farm. A Business College course later gave my sister Lou and me some knowledge of book keeping, which we found very useful in after years.

Marketing the produce of the farm gave me a break from the usual routine. Apples, potatoes, green corn and even pumpkins were in demand, and one summer we had a wonderful crop of Strawberries, Father had contracted with a fruit firm in Montreal to take all the berries. I think the price was eight cents a box delivered at Lyn station. However, at the height of the season this firm wired to send no more berries as they were going bankrupt. They had paid all they owed us up to this time, so Father said we would have to sell them on the streets of Brockville.

One day I had disposed of one fifty-four box crate on the street and had just opened the other. I remember I was on a street just east of William and running at right angles with this street when an engine came puffing along on the C.P.R. tracks. My horse started to run but he was headed east, and I knew he could only go around that block and would come back on to William street. So I turned back, ran over to this street and met him. The crate of berries by this time was standing nearly on its end, but as I had fastened down the lid, I found a lot of the boxes empty and the contents piled there, and pretty well mussed up. A woman had wanted to buy my whole crate previously, so I went back to her, told her what had happened and offered her all I had at five cents a box – we could count the empty ones. She agreed, and produced a large dish-pan, a bread pan, and a wash boiler. When I went back next day she was still picking over the strawberries.

Lee’s Pond Dam

But to get back to memories of the village. One day in the spring of 1884, March 28th to be exact, a farmer living at Seeley’s, John W. Booth, came in on horseback, another Paul Revere, rode up to the door of the Post Office, and called out, “Mr. Mallory, get ready! The dam at Lee Pond has gone out and the water is coming. I am telling you to get ready!” Then he went through the village and down to the grist mill to warn them there. At first it was thought it was all a hoax, but going to the pond at the back of the store the men saw muddy water coming down. With boards and bags the doors were barricaded, and in a few minutes the rush of water two feet deep came, tearing up the stone of the street and washing everything movable down to the valley below. The bridge at the foot of the mill hill was carried away, floated across the flats to about where the B&W station now stands, and lodged against a couple of trees.

I remember when the waters subsided, Tom Hudson came for my father, and together they managed to get the bridge and with long poles floated it back to the side of the road, and next day with moving jacks drew it back on its foundations. The village stores were in a sorry mess. Water and mud had gone over the top of the barricade and into the interiors. At the blacksmith shop, wagon wheels, parts of milk wagons and the various collection of machines had been left outside; later some of those were found on the flats below the mill; others were never recovered.

Lyn’s Blacksmith Shop

The blacksmith shop was the usual gathering place for the farmers on a rainy day, each one bringing a horse to be shod or wagon wheel to be repaired, and many a story was told to the amusement of the village loafers. In front of the old box stove there was always a long bench and it was usually occupied. Sometimes a checker board was produced and a couple of the old men started a game. One player, more skillful than the other, near the end of the game would seem to have his opponent all bottled up. Then someone would draw his attention to someone passing along the street, and with a piece of stick would move one of the checkers, so that when the players looked back at their game it had a different aspect. Another, a habitual loafer, usually was on this bench, and the boys, securing some thumb tacks, would put them through the tail of his coat and into the edge of the bench, so that when he would be called to the door by one of these same boys, the bench went with him, tipping over the checkers and players at the other end. Other times they would fill his overcoat pockets with small iron scraps, heavy enough that when he attempted to move he would drop back again on the bench.

Lyn, like many other villages, had its usual number of characters. One couple I remember particularly. The husband was a small man, not too industrious. The wife was tall, angular and quite masculine. One day the husband had bought a load of wood from a farmer, who was unloading it at the side of the house when the wife appeared. Standing there with her hands on her hips she said “My man how much did you pay for that wood?” He replied, “Three dollars.” “Well” she said “it ain’t worth it” and went into the house. The farmer, looking at the husband said “Well?” The husband said. “Yes, guess you will have to do as she says.” In a few minutes he walked over and looked up in the farmers face. “Say, its awful provoking, ain’t it?” he said.

Years later while I was carrying on my work in the village, a farmer from Caintown, whom we will call Jack, came in one afternoon, saying that they were boiling sap that day in his bush. He invited the four lads in the shop u that night to have sugar. Of course they went, taking a lunch with them. During the early part of the night, when the sugar was about ready, one of the boy’s said it would be great if they just had some fried chicken to eat with their lunch. Jack at once spoke up and said “You know my neighbour has a dandy lot of Rock chickens, nearly full size now, and if a couple of you lads go out to the road and into John M’s hen house, just pick one off the roost and I will clean and fry it for you. I have lots of butter and some corn meal here to sprinkle over the frying pan.” Away they went and soon back with a four pound bird. Jack had a kettle of hot water ready and he doused it in, then proceeded to pluck off the feathers, saying as he did so. “My! won’t John M. be mad when he misses this chicken!”

But,” he sad, “maybe we had better burn these feathers for fear someone should come in and see them.” The fried chicken was just right. When the boys were no longer hungry and the syrup was ready to be taken off they cleaned up the chicken bones, burned them and went home,

Next morning Jack watched for his neighbour, John M. to go to his hen house. He came out with a pan of feed, went in to his chickens, and finally came out and went into the house. Jack thought “Well, he has not missed the fowl or he doesn’t care,” and at last he decided to feed his own flock. Walking over to his hen house he noticed some footprints in the dirt, then going to the door and stepping inside he noticed that his hens were making a fuss as though they had been scared. Looking around then he saw why John M. Had gone so quietly into his house again. The chicken that he had beheaded and plucked was not John M’s! It was one of his own!

It was nearly a month before Jack came into the village, and the first greeting he got as he tied his horse was from across the street. It was one of those boys who had helped to eat the chicken, and he said “Hello Jack! When are we going to get some more fried chicken?”

Chapter II

Lyn’s Flour Mill

The flour mills built in 1857 by the Coleman Company when Lyn was a flourishing manufacturing centre, later went into bankruptcy and were taken over in 1876 by James Cumming acting for the bank. He later purchased the whole property and carried on the business successfully doing custom grinding, manufacturing several popular bands of flour and furnishing employment for about twenty men.

James Cumming’s son Gordon, associated with him until the former’s tragic death in 1916, carried on the business until 1933 when severe competition from larger manufactures compelled the Lyn flour mills to close.

In the first chapter I mentioned the fact that the loss of the tan bark by fire caused the two tanneries to close down. However, another custom tannery located west of the village, at the foot of a lane running down across the line of the Brockville and Westport Railway, past the home of Nathan Purvis, was in operation for a considerable period after the larger tanneries closed.

Henry Booth, the proprietor, lived in an ancient frame house just across the lane from the Purvis home. He used hemlock bark for tanning, and the mill for grinding the bark was powered by a long wooden shaft similar to the ones on horse powers of that time. That is, one horse was used to turn the mill, by being hitched to the end of the shaft and walking in a circle round and round. Mr. Booth was considered an expert at tanning calf-skins and cowhides. The finished leather was taken to the shoe shop of Peter Pergau, who fashioned it into boots for his customers. The walls of this tannery are still standing, a reminder of an industry long since gone.

Harness Shop, Main Street, Lyn

Harness leather was also manufactured in two flourishing shops, one, Norman Coleman’s and the other Sels Orton, who had a shop across the street from the present blacksmith shop.

Another industry, and undertaking establishment, did a good business. Edward Bagg had a workshop on the corner behind the home of Mrs. Blake Mott, and furnished caskets of his own manufacture.

The old tannery at the foot of the hill below the upright sawmill was leased to the G.F.C. Eyre Mfg. Co. About the year 1901. This firm did a good business manufacturing wooden dry measures, cheese boxes, hub blocks for carriage wheels, and wheel barrows. They also had a saw mill for custom sawing and cut cedar shingles. This carried on for five or six years, employing twelve or fifteen men, but financial difficulties looked and the firm went out of business. N.R. Gardiner bought the machinery and did business for a few years, but a dispute over the lease compelled the closing of the factory, and Mr. Gardiner removed the machinery and sold it.

The Last Factory

The Lyn Last Works, started by Bulloch and Coleman, manufactured boot lasts, boot trees to form the long boots then worn, and dies for cutting the soles for the shoes. Mr. Coleman passed away and James Cumming carried on with Mr. Bulloch for several years finally selling out to his son, A.E.Cumming, who overhauled the building and machinery. For many years it provided paying employment as a lot of men did piecework and became very skillful at their job.

Logs were purchased during the winter and later cut into short lengths, then split in sizes to be turned into lasts. These blocks were stored in an airy dry barn to season for three or four months, then carried to the factory. But the maple was fast being used up locally and blocks had to be purchased from Quebec. This difficulty finally compelled the factory to close, and threw ten or more men out of employment. The building was later sold to the Brundige family of Frankville, who conducted a custom saw mill until the building burned on March 29th,1924.

At one time a stave factory was located just below the last factory. They manufactured staves for all types of barrels. This building burned on May 7th 1862.

McNish Foundry

Another industry which had been doing a good business from about 1890 to 1920 was the Lyn Foundry, owned by George P. McNish. He manufactured land rollers, hand cultivators, plows, root cutters and feed cookers, but competition by larger concerns finally compelled the closing of this business. For a few years Alba Root carried on a business in a red building at the edge of the canal finally moving his cheese box equipment to Greenbush about the year 1902. Henry Graham, who owned a portable saw mill and tractor engine, leased the building formerly used by N.R. Gardiner and in 1912 did custom sawing.

After the spring cutting was finished, the traction engine was driven up the hill past the old shoe factory, burning slabs for fuel and emitting sparks from the smoke stack along the way. On one of these trips sparks ignited the roof of the shoe factory, but a heavy shower coming at just the right time saved the building. However on a later moving, May 11, 1914, the shoe factory was not so fortunate. Long vacant, it burned fiercely, a strong east wind carrying sparks over the village. The old carriage shop, later a cheese factory, next caught fire, then Stack’s ice-house and across the street the George Hensby house occupied by William Young, caught fire and burned. The roughcast house on Main Street next to the canal was on fire but was saved. R.F. Tennant’s verandah started burning and the steps were destroyed. Sparks carried by the gale set fire to the barn and stable of John Serviss behind the residence now occupied by James Manhard and Florence Roberts Next went the house and shed of Dave McCrady. The fire engine from Brockville arrived in time to save only the kitchen of the McCrady house.

But to turn to pleasanter things. I have many memories of the concerts given by local talent, when John Square, our painter and decorator would impersonate Harry Lauder and give some of his very popular Scotch songs. During spring cleaning, john Squire was a most unpopular man among many housewives, who had been promised immediate work by John, and then waited in vain. But all was forgiven him at our annual library concerts, when his Scotch songs delighted us!

I can still remember him with Cora Morrison, now Mrs. Burnham, and Catherine Neilson Gray, doing a pretty piece of work together.

The Minstrels in black face comprised the following boys: Arthur Hudson, Frank Stafford, Willie Clow, Willie McNish, Lorne Cumming, Jack Cumming, John Square and one or two others. What nights! What fun at the preceding practices! Mrs. Ern Cumming was always our pianist, and her home was always open house to those boys.

Many stories are told of practical jokes played on the local inhabitants. One of these was at a time many years ago when there was a very hotly contested election in the offing. Mr. Armstrong, a prominent Liberal, was waiting at the Post Office for his daily paper, The Globe, then strongly Liberal, whose editor, George Brown, wrote many campaign editorials.

Thee Mail and Empire was tossed to Mr. Armstrong. Not looking to see what paper it was he started reading, and seeing a bitter article condemning the Liberal organization, he threw down the paper, turned to his companion, and said, “Did you see this? My God! Has George Brown gone crazy?”

A Democrat Wagon

One story that Father enjoyed telling was the following: One summer a number of residents of the vicinity decided that a trip to Charleston Lake would be in order. Securing a three seated democrat wagon and team, eight or nine farmers left for the lake, and enjoyed a week’s holiday camping. On their trip home they decided to go around by Farmersville, now Athens, and have a picture taken of the group. I do not remember all of the group but my father was one of the ringleaders.

Mr. Kenneth Morrison, a prominent Scotsman and a wonderful athlete, said. “Well, boys, if we are going to have our pictures taken I am going to change into a clean pair of trousers.” Stopping the team, Mr. Morrison climbed out and took off his trousers, handed them up to his seat mate and reached for another pair. The driver, watching the performance, struck the horses with the whip and away they went, leaving the Scotchman paint-less. Well, he started running after the wagon, and the driver would almost stop to let him in, and away they would go again. Naturally, Mr. Morrison got mad, and threatened to exterminate the whole crowd when he got hold of them. Then someone called out, “Oh here comes a buggy with a woman in it.” “What will I do?” said the victim, and they advised him to get behind the rail fence, which he did. They finally let him have his trousers, after making him promise not to wreak his wrath on the driver!

Postcards – Birthday and Humorous

Postcards were a chance for people to send “best wishes” for special occasions to their family and friends, or just to keep in touch. The postage on these cards was cheaper than a letter and the cost of the card less than that of an actual birthday card as we know them today.

It was a way to stay in tough with friends and family and sometimes send an occasional bit of humour through the mail. These postcards give us a very accurate snapshot of the humour and attitudes of the people of that time, they give us a look into what daily life was like.

While our collection is small, we wanted to share with you what those who sent these to their family and friends back home.

We are always interested in increasing our collection so that we may share with everyone this glimpse into our past. If you have postcards there are three ways in which you could share them with us:

1) a direct donation to the museum

2) loan them to us, we will scan them and return the originals to you

3) if you have a digital image you can send it to us at our email address: LynMuseum@gmail.com

Birthday

A Happy Birthday to You
Birthday Greetings
Hearty Birthday Greetings
Birthday Greetings
A Happy Birthday
A Happy Birthday
Best Wishes
Birthday Greetings
Accept all good wishes
Best Birthday Wishes
Birthday Greetings
Best Wishes
All good wishes for a bright and happy furure
A Birthday Wish – I greet you with an earnest wish; May happy days be thine, May every birthday bring you joy, So runs this wish of mine
Greetings- With loving Thoughts and Best Wishes on your Birthday
Wishing you a joyous Birthday- Like the birds song to the flower, Like the blossom to the spray, Like the sunshine to the flower, May Heaven’s smile gleam on your way

 

Humorous

I wish I had a fellow
Ready for the next
Happy dreams of long ago
Well, you have a nice old mess of it !
This is the year the girls propose, give me a ring instead of a rose
The Daily News
I regret that a large gathering at my rooms, quite a swell affair, prevents my accepting your kind invitation
“Sunshine of St. Eulalie was she called; for that was the sunshine Which, as the farmers believed, would load their orchards with apples”- Longfellow’s Evaangeline
When a girl puts on a man’s hat, it’s a sign she wants to kiss him.
You make me laugh
I don’t mind being held by the right one
Am detained. Position very awkward.
Am busy looking into matters here – ” Full line of peek a boo waists and open work stockings”
Take oh take my loving heart, And let us as a pear depart
Take me on trial, in Brockville , Ont.
A Thtoughbred
Happy Days
I never get tired boosting for “Greenbush” It’s sure a swell place
Joy Riding at Alexandria Bay N.Y.
Something doin’ in New Dublin
Said the old fat Rooster, To the little Brown Hen: “You haven’t laid an egg since the Lord knows when” Said the little Brown Hen to the old fat Rooster: “You don’t come around as often as you used ter”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The General Store in Lyn

C.M. Taylor Drugs

The General Store in Lyn was located at 25 Main Street West and was first owned by A. T. Trickey. It was a drug store and also a general merchandise store. A.T. Trickey ran it until approximately 1890 when it was purchased by Mr. Gardiner. Mr. Gardiner did not have a druggist pharmacy license so he hired a fellow from Tamworth, Ontario by the name of C. M. Taylor. He went to work for Mr. Gardiner, later married Mr. Gardiner’s daughter and eventually took over the store. Mr. Taylor and his wife eventually took over the Gardiner house on Perth Street, which is north of the United Church. They lived there for many years and had one daughter who lived there until approximately the 1950’s. Next Eldon Coon took over that house and built a new house for Miss Taylor to live in. Originally the house was built by the Coleman Family and it was said that every brick in it had been wrapped in tissue paper and shipped from England and all the steel rims around the outside had been made in France by the same people who made the Eiffel Tower.

In 1919 the store was sold to John McCrady who worked part time for Mr. Taylor. When he took over the store it became more of a grocery store than anything. He sold ice from the ice house behind the store. The hotel that was next to it burned in 1928 and what was left of the walls remained there until the late 1940’s. He ran the store until the late 1940’s when he sold it to his son Dave McCrady.

J.C. McCrady General Store

Dave McCrady ran the store for a couple of years and then sold it to Frank McCrady, his brother. In 1947 Frank sold it to Earl “Dusty” and Cleta Miller. They took over the store, enlarged it, fixed the apartment upstairs and lived above the store. They built a piece beside the store from which they sold appliances. They ran it until 1985 when they sold it to the Pourier Brothers. Under their ownership the business didn’t survive and they left. The store was sold to a fellow from Hopetown. He started to renovate the inside but it caught fire and burned through the roof. The building was then torn down and an empty lot was left. The lot remained empty until Ursula Veltcamp bought it and built the little restaurant that is now there. The Stack hotel was right beside it on the western side.

C. M. Taylor Druggist c1908
C,M, Taylor Drugs with the Stack Hotel on the right c 1908
C. M. Taylor Drugs
J.C. McCrady Red and White Store c1950
D. R. McCrady Red and White Store

Miller’s General Store c1970
Millers Red and White Store c 1970
Calico Cat

Postcards for Special Holidays

Postcards were a chance for people to send “best wishes” for special occasions to their family and friends, or just to keep in touch. The postage on these cards was cheaper than a letter and the cost of the card less than that of an actual birthday or Christmas card as we know them today.

It was a way to stay in tough with friends and family and sometimes send an occasional bit of humour through the mail. These postcards give us a very accurate snapshot of the humour and attitudes of the people of that time, they give us a look into what daily life was like.

While our collection is small, we wanted to share with you what those who sent these to their family and friends back home.

We are always interested in increasing our collection so that we may share with everyone this glimpse into our past. If you have postcards there are three ways in which you could share them with us:

1) a direct donation to the museum

2) loan them to us, we will scan them and return the originals to you

3) if you have a digital image you can send it to us at our email address: LynMuseum@gmail.com

Happy New Year

A bright and happy New Year
A Joyous New Year
A Happy New Year- To enjoy happy memories off time past- to delight in lovely visions of Future and to Live joyfully in the present.
May you get your full share of Good Things this festive season
A Happy New Year- May it be the best one yet, with many more to come
A Happy New Year
A Happy New Year
A Happy New Year
New Year Once Again
A Happy New Year

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If next year brings all the gladness, That I hope you may receive, You will have no time for sadness, Nor remember how to grieve

 

 

Valentines Day

A Token of Love
This message is for you my dear- Your looking glass will make it clear

 

 

True Love, Sweet Heart, To My Valentine
A Hearts Taken – To my Valentine
A Loving Thought
Valentine Greetings- Wont you swap your heart for mine, and be my little Valentine

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Valentine Greetings – When Cupid plays his little tricks, And fills with love divine, I find my heart is in a fix, So be my Valentine

 

 

 

My Valentine Puzzle – My name is not Maud, Mag nor Sue., But here is just what I will do- Just guess who sent this, And I’ll give you a kiss- If one’s not sufficient- take two

St. Patrick’s Day

A flower of more pretentious worth, Can not be more plainly tell, The triple faith I have in thee, Thou Shamrock of the dell

 

Easter

Happy Eastertide
A Joyous Easter
A Happy Eastertide
Easter Greetings – Just an Easter greeting true, Because of my regard for you.
Easter Greetings
Easter Greetings

 

 

May Yours be a Happy Easter
A Happy Eastertide – Like the sunshine after the rain, Easter gladness comes again, The risen Lord with your abide, And bless for you this Eastertide
A Joyful Easter – While the sunshine and the dew, Draw up from the earth its flowers anew, May the sun of Easter Love, Draw our hearts to Heaven above.
A Joyous Easter
A Joyful Eastertide
Happy Easter
Easter Greetings
Easter Greetings
May Easter Joys be with you
A Happy Easter – Earth awakes to the Easter music, Her Bosom with praise overflows, The Forest breaks forth into singing, For the desert has bloomed as the rose
Easter Joys be Thine – With all my heart, I wish for thee, A time of resurrection power, Oh, may thy life forever be, As sweet and pure as Easter flower
Easter Happiness – May all that is fairest and truest and best, Be given to thee of the king, May love, in its perfect completeness of rest, To thee Easter happiness bring
A Happy Easter
A Joyous Easter
Easter Greetings- The happiest moments of my life I spend sending Easter greetings to my friends

 

 

Best Easter Wishes
Best Wishes
Happy Eastertide
Easter Greetings
A Happy Easter
God bless Easter Morning
Joyous Easter
Easter Blessings – God bless thee at this time of flowers, When balmy breezes move, God bless thee through life’s changing hours, With whispers of his love
Eastertide- The wild flowers sweetly greet you

 

 

 

Easter Wishes

Thanksgiving

Cordial Thanksgiving Greetings
Good Wishes for Thanksgiving Day
Thanksgiving Day
Wishing you a Happy Thanksgiving
Thanksgiving Day
I am coming for Thanksgiving, Just that alone makes life worth living

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Halloween

 

Holloween
A Jolly Halloween
The highest expectations for Halloween

 

 

Lee Family Photo Album

Unfortunately here we have another photo album without any names or dates attached to the pictures. Some of them can be identified by the background, and others can be dated by the clothing styles. The album was in the possession of the Lee Family, and we do know from other named photos that the Lee Family was friends with Anson McNish.

If you recognize anyone in these photos please let us know who they are.

 

Eastern Hospital, Brockville, Ontario- Postcard from 1911

 

Nurses at the Eastern Ontario Psychiatric Hospital #1
Nurses and Staff on the Hospital Grounds #2
Nurses and Staff on one of the Hospital Buildings steps #3
Nurses and Staff from the hospital #4
Interior in one of the hospital buildings #5
Dining Room in one of the hospital buildings #8
A nursing sister #6
A nursing sister #7
Sisters ? #9

 

# 10
#11
# 12

 

# 13
# 14
# 15

 

# 16
# 17
# 18
# 19

 

Katie # 20
In the garden # 20

 

In the Garden # 21
In the garden # 22
In the garden # 23
In the garden # 24
In the Garden # 25
Wedding Photos taken in the garden # 26

 

In the Garden # 27

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Taken along King Street, Brockville # 28

The Children

 

# 29
# 30
# 31

 

# 32

 

# 33
# 35

 

 

 

# 34
# 36
# 38
# 37

 

# 41

 

# 39

 

# 40
# 43
# 42
# 45
# 44
# 47

 

 

# 48

 

 

# 46
# 49

 

 

# 50

 

 

Jas. Bolger’s Groceries, unknown location # 51

 

# 52
# 53
# 54
# 56

 

 

 

# 55

 

 

 

 

 

 

# 57
# 58
# 59
# 60
# 61

 

 

 

 

 

 

# 62

 

# 63

 

# 65
# 66
# 67
# 68
# 69

 

 

# 70
# 71

 

 

Parade on King St. Brockville looking at Court House Square # 72

 

Summer camp along the river # 73

 

A hunting Cabin # 74

 

Bathing # 75
# 76
# 77

 

# 78
# 79
# 80

 

 

 

 

Using an ax # 81

 

An Old Stage Coach # 82

 

On the St Lawrence in front of the Reynolds Coal Dock, west end # 83

 

Steamer St. Lawrence passing the Brockville Water Works, east end of Brockville # 84

Kilborn Spring on the Lyn Road

This little know natural flowing spring once attracted hundreds of visitors from around the area. The spring is located about 5 minutes south of Lyn on the Lyn road, where it intersects the Old Red Road (Chemical Road).

Whether or not this spring is still there now, we don’t know but in the early 1900’s it attracted people from Lyn, Brockville and the area who came with empty bottles and jugs to fill with this mineral rich spring water. The mineral water was thought to have healthy medicinal properties for those who drank it.

The spring took it’s name from the Kilborn family that lived and farmed in an old stone house just down and across the Lyn Road, that stone house still stands today.

The re-alignment of the Lyn Road in the 1970’s may have effected this spring.

A close up view of the outcropping of the limestone rock

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kilborn Spring
Looking north on the Lyn Road with the spring on the left
The outcropping of Limestone on the hill above the spring
Kilborn Sring
Kilborn Spring

Dunster Family Photo Album

Photos taken from the Dunster Family Album. Unfortunately some photos had no name or date on them, if you recognize anyone, please let us know. The majority of photos date from the late 1940’s to early 1950’s.

Brockville Cadet Parade 1950 #1
Brockville Cadet Parade 1950 #2
Brockville Cadet Parade in front of BCI on Pearl St. #3
Brockvile Cadet Parade 11950 #4
Brocivlle Cadet Parade on Pearl St. E. 1950 #5
Brockville Cadet Parade 1950 on Pearl St. #6
Brockville Girls Cadets 1950 #7
Brockville Girls Cadets on King St. E 1950 #8
In formaation on Court House Green 1950 #8
Brockville Girls Cadets on Court House Green 1950 #9
Counties Court House in the background 1950 #10
Unknown Cadet on King St. next to Fullerton’s Drug Store 1950 #11
Unknown Cadet 1950 #12

 

Nursing student in front of Comstock Building, Brockville #13
Nursing Student in front of Nurses residence, Comstock Building, Brockville #14
Nursing Student in front of Comstock Residence #15
Colleen and Helen on the Lyn Pond 1950 St. John Hall in the background #16

 

Hattie Dickey, Main Street Lyn #17
Elery Edgeley on the Lyn Mill Pond 1949 #18
Keith McCrady skating on the Lyn Pond 1949 #19
Harry McCrady skating on the Lyn Pond 1949 #20
Mrs. Sager, Lyn 1949 #21
Uknown standing in front of Coons Bakery, Main Street Lyn #22
Three unknown girls #23
Four unknown children #24
Unknown Children #25
Unkown on King St W. Brockville with Buell Street in the background #26
Unknown in front of house #27
Unknown on lawn chair #28
Unknown in front of car #30
Unknown next to car #29
Mary Dunster #31
Sam Dunster, WW II #32
Frank and Mary Dunster #33
Frank Dunster #35
Samuel Dunster WW I #34
Sam Dunster at the Brockville Railroad station #37
Harold and Frank Dunster 1947 #36
Mary Dunster and Mary Kilmury at the Lyn Pond #38
San Dunster on right, Camp Barriefield 1916 #40
Group of unknown soldiers #39

 

Post Cards – International

Postcards were a chance for those travelling to send back home a glimpse of what they were seeing. Postcards give us a very accurate snapshot of the cities, buildings and people of that time, they give us a look into what daily life was like.

For those who stayed home, a postcard was there window to the world, treasured and saved.

While our collection is small, we wanted to share with you what those who sent these to their family and friends back home.

If you have been to any of these places, here’s your chance to see what it used to look like.

We are always interested in increasing our collection so that we may share with everyone this glimpse into our past. If you have postcards there are three ways in which you could share them with us:

1) a direct donation to the museum

2) loan them to us, we will scan them and return the originals to you

3) if you have a digital image you can send it to us at our email address: LynMuseum@gmail.com

 

Souvenir of 1936- The Year of the Three Kings

 

Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth

 

Bank of England and Royal Exchange

 

In the Gardens, Golders Hill Park

 

End of a Great Career, Military Funeral of a General

 

Kings Head, Chigwell

 

Burns Birthplace, Ayr

 

Windsor Castle, The Grand Reception Room

 

Paris- Le Jardin de Luxembourg

 

Paris – L’Avenue de l’Opera

 

Paris – L’Arc de Triumphe

 

Paris- la Rue de Rivoli et le Pavillon de Marsan

 

Paris – Le Boulevard des Italiens

 

Paris – Le Dome des Invalides

 

Paris – La Madeleine

 

Paris – La Place de la Bastille

 

Paris – La Bourse

 

Paris – Le Sacre Coeur

 

Paris – Le Trocadero

 

Paris – Facade de Notre-Dame

 

Paris – La Rue Soufflol el le Pantheon
Paris – Vue generale du Louvre

 

 

 

 

Post Cards from Niagara Falls, Ontario

Postcards were a chance for those travelling to send back home a glimpse of what they were seeing. Postcards give us a very accurate snapshot of the cities, buildings and people of that time, they give us a look into what daily life was like.

For those who stayed home, a postcard was there window to the world, treasured and saved.

While our collection is small, we wanted to share with you what those who sent these to their family and friends back home.

If you have been to any of these places, here’s your chance to see what it used to look like.

We are always interested in increasing our collection so that we may share with everyone this glimpse into our past. If you have postcards there are three ways in which you could share them with us:

1) a direct donation to the museum

2) loan them to us, we will scan them and return the originals to you

3) if you have a digital image you can send it to us at our email address: LynMuseum@gmail.com

 

Rock of Ages and American Falls from below, Niagara Falls

 

American Falls from Canada, Niagara

 

Prospect Point, Niagara Falls

 

Ice Bridge, Niagara Falls

 

General View of Niagara Falls from Canadian Side

 

Maid of the Mist, Niagara Falls

 

Whirlpool and Aero Car, Niagara Falls

 

Niagara Falls from Great Gorge Route, Bird’s Eye View of Suspension Bridge connecting Queenston, Ontario and Lewiston, New York

 

Cave of the Winds and “Rock of Ages” Niagara Falls

 

Interior of St. Patrick’s Church, Niagara Falls, Canada

 

Whirlpool Rapids, Niagara Falls

 

Cave of the Winds, American Falls, Niagara (postmarked 1919)

 

Maid of the Mist and American Falls of Niagara

 

Cantilever and Steel Arch Bridges

 

 

Post Cards from Ontario

Postcards were a chance for those travelling to send back home a glimpse of what they were seeing. Postcards give us a very accurate snapshot of the cities, buildings and people of that time, they give us a look into what daily life was like.

For those who stayed home, a postcard was there window to the world, treasured and saved.

While our collection is small, we wanted to share with you what those who sent these to their family and friends back home.

If you have been to any of these places, here’s your chance to see what it used to look like.

We are always interested in increasing our collection so that we may share with everyone this glimpse into our past. If you have postcards there are three ways in which you could share them with us:

1) a direct donation to the museum

2) loan them to us, we will scan them and return the originals to you

3) if you have a digital image you can send it to us at our email address: LynMuseum@gmail.com

 

Montreal Road, Cummings Bridge (Ottawa) Ont.

 

King Street (East) looking West, showing Sir John Macdonald statue, Hamilton, Ont.

 

Regatta Day, Stony Lake, Kawartha Lakes, Ont.

 

Municipal Buildings, Cobourg, Canada

 

Queens Square showing Knox Church and Opera House, Galt, Ont., Canada

 

Dickson School, Galt, Ont.

 

Birds Eye View of Merrickville, Ont., Golf Links in back ground.

 

St. Lawrence Street, Merrickville, Ont.

 

Ottawa River Scene

 

Chaudiere Falls, Ottawa

 

Wellington St., Ottawa

 

Parliament Buildings from Nepean Point, Ottawa
Sir John A. Macdonald Monument, Ottawa
Entrance to House of Parliament, Ottawa

 

Jarvis Street Baptist Church, Toronto, Canada

 

City Hall, Toronto

 

Osgoode Hall (Law Courts), Toronto, Canada

 

The Armouries, Toronto, Canada

 

Temple Building, Toronto, Canada

 

On the Terrace showing Manufactures’ and Women’s Building, Toronto Exhibition, Canada

 

Trinity College, Toronto, Canada

 

Bridge, at Little River, Gore Street, Perth, Ont.

 

Water Scene near the Island, Toronto

 

Perth, Ont.

 

Scene on the Tay, Perth, Ont.

 

Victoria Park, Smith’s Falls, Ont.
Poonahmalee Cut above Smiths Falls, Ont.

 

Harbor Scene Prescott
Water Front, Prescott, Ont.

 

King Street West, Iroquois, Ont.

 

Minden, Ont.

 

Post Office & Parliament Blds., Ottawa

 

Ontario Wheat Field

 

Harvesting

 

 

 

Postcards from Canada

Postcards were a chance for those travelling to send back home a glimpse of what they were seeing. Postcards give us a very accurate snapshot of the cities, buildings and people of that time, they give us a look into what daily life was like.

For those who stayed home, a postcard was there window to the world, treasured and saved.

While our collection is small, we wanted to share with you what those who sent these to their family and friends back home.

If you have been to any of these places, here’s your chance to see what it used to look like.

We are always interested in increasing our collection so that we may share with everyone this glimpse into our past. If you have postcards there are three ways in which you could share them with us:

1) a direct donation to the museum

2) loan them to us, we will scan them and return the originals to you

3) if you have a digital image you can send it to us at our email address: LynMuseum@gmail.com

(You may notice that some of the upper left corner is missing on some post cards, this is where the stamp was and someone wanted it for their collection)

 

Canada

 

Main Street, Moose Jaw, (Saskatchewan)

 

Hospital, Moose Jaw, Sask

 

Plowing in Saskatchewan

 

Portage la Prairie, Man. Birds Eye View

 

Mount Royal Ave, East, Montreal, Canada

 

Montreal in the forest lands on Mount Royal

 

Dominion Square, Montreal

 

 

Garneau Monument, Quebec, Que

 

The Basilica and City Hall Square, Quebec

 

One o’clock Gun, Halifax, N.S.

 

Keppoch Shore, P.E. Island

 

View of Reston, Man.

 

Hastings Street, Vancouver, B.C.

 

Corner Granville and Hastings Streets, Vancouver, B.C.

 

Dominion Trust Building, Vancouver, B.C.

 

Waterfront and Shipping Vancouver, B.C. (postmarked 1906)

 

Hell’s Gate, Fraser Canyon

 

Sunrise on the West Coast

 

Overlooking Capilano Canyon, Vancouver, B.C.

 

Jasper Avenue, Edmonton, Alta.

 

Life in the Canadian West “Roping the Steer”
Buffaloes at Edmonton, Alta., Canada
Life in the Canadian West: “The Cowboy Race”

 

 

 

 

The Great Divide, Stephen, Canadian Rockies

 

The Home of D.E.Black & Co., Limited, Calgary, Alta.

 

Grain Exchange, Calgary, Alta.

 

Central School, Calgary, Alta., Canada

 

C.P.R. Main Line near Yoho, B.C.

 

Baniff Alberta

 

G.T.P. Freight Yards, Prince George, B.C.

 

Spy Hill Dairy & Stock Farm- Calgary Central Creamery

 

Down Bow River showing Mount Rundle, Banff, Canadian Rockies

 

Takakkaw Falls, (1200 feet high), Yoho Valley, Canadian Rockies

 

 

Log Driving on the Gatineau River

 

City Hall and Jacques Cartier Square, Montreal

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

B & W Railroad – 1930

The Athens Reporter- the following article was in this paper on April 3, 1930. The original newspapers are in the archives of the Heritage House Museum, Athens, Ontario

 

Word was received this week in Brockville to the effect that no change will be made on the Westport sub-division of the Canadian National Railways, at least until the time arrives for the closing of the schools and in the meantime further consideration and study will be made by the management of the system to the details of a new schedule.

Following is a telegram received from Montreal by J. Gill Gardiner, a director of the railways.

“It has been decided to make no change in Westport service until the closing of the schools. This will give time for making arrangements for the opening of the schools in the fall. In the meantime, further consideration will be given to a new schedule.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Toll Roads – The Athens Reporter 1906

The Athens Reporter- letter to the editor from 1906. The original newspapers are in the archives of the Heritage House Museum, Athens, Ontario

 The Toll Roads- April 25, 1906

(Letter to the editor)

Having recently driven over the road between Athens and Brockville, I feel moved to offer a few observations on the state of that particular highway. To find fault with the roads at this season, and after the kind of winter we have had, may look like fault finding with Providence. No such complaint is intended; we should rather be thankful that through the agencies of frost and rain the disgraceful ruts of the Brockville road have been broken up from the bottom. This upheaval will lead to a smoother road than has been; for when dry weather comes the loose material will pack together and form a comparatively even surface. It is time something happened to these ruts, and we should all be thankful that nature has come to our relief.

But the question is, what part are the toll road people going to take in this good work? Are they going to leave the road to take care of itself, as heretofore, or is it their intention to do the repairing demanded by common decency? There is perhaps no more ridiculous spectacle to be seen in the Province than that of travellers stopping at the toll gates between Athens and Brockville to pay toll. If at these gates travellers were halted and presented with some silver coins, here would be a reason for these gates; for as a matter of fact, people driving over this road should receive remuneration. The labourer is worthy of his hire.

The disgraceful state of this road calls attention again to the fact that it is time for the abolition of tolls between this village and Brockville. It is a notorious fact that toll-roads are seldom or never good roads. The gates are a constant source of annoyance to the public, and, in the opinion of the writer, the work of collecting toll in all weathers and at all hours from people in all sorts of humors must be anything but an agreeable occupation. The toll road, in fact, is almost entirely bad. It is an exceedingly expensive road, that is, expensive to the public. There are three charges against such a road: (1) the interest on the company’s investment (2) the profits of the gatekeepers, and (3) the cost of keeping the road in repair. The public has to “put up” for all three; whereas, if the road were taken out of the hands of the company, two of these sources of expense would be eliminated. Toll roads are also objectionable for the reason that they have a tendency, and by no means a slight tendency, to damage trade. The fact that a toll gate has to be passed is sufficient to keep a certain number of people at home who would otherwise come into town on business. This may seem an unwarranted statement, but it is true. It is the conviction of the writer that if there were any way of arriving at an estimate it would be found that the business of Brockville is damaged every year to the extent of hundreds of dollars through the existence of toll gates, and Athens in proportion. This shortage of business is made up in other places not affected by the gates, or, perhaps, it is not made up at all. Merchants, professional men, and the public generally suffer in consequence. A free circulation of traffic is necessary to prosperity, just as is the free circulation of blood is necessary to the health of the body, and anything that impedes the free movement of traffic and intercourse generally ought to be abolished.

The charges that might be brought against the toll road do not end here. It is time for a change. Toll roads are coning more and more to be regards as barbarous relics of by gone days. All over the Province they are being taken over by the local and county municipalities. Why should we in this district lag behind other municipalities in the march of progress and go down in history with the unenviable record of having been the last to abolish the toll road nuisance?

Signed: I.N. Beckstedt

Toledo – News from the Village – 1924 to 1930

The Athens Reporter- excerpts have been taken from this newspaper for the years – 1924 to 1930. The original newspapers are in the archives of the Heritage House Museum, Athens, Ontario

Toledo – Nov 15th, 1924

Mr. and Mrs. Duncan McClure were Perth visitors on Friday, the 7th inst.

Misses Laura and Dorothy McClure of Perth, spent Thanksgiving holidays with relatives and friends here.

William Walsh Jr., has returned from the Canadian West where he spent the autumn.

Several from outlying points spent Thanksgiving with their parents and included Yates Marshall and Denton McClure, of Smiths Falls Collegiate Institute; Miss Marguerite McNamee of Brockville, who was accompanied by her friend, Miss Fennell of that town.

William Moran was a recent visitor at the home of his son in Plattsburg, N.Y.

W.C. Dowsley, I.P.S., of Brockville, visited the Toledo School on Thursday.

His many friends hope to hear of a better report soon, from James Gray, who had to be demoved [sic] to a Brockville hospital on Thursday morning.

Mrs. George Pepper recently disposed of her farm to Joseph Carr, of Frankville, and she and her daughter, Miss Irene Pepper, pudpose taking up permanent residence in Smith’s Falls in the near future.

Some of our local Nimrods have returned laden with spoil. Robert Mackie was hunting in the district north of Ashton, while Bert Ladouceur was with a parth which went to the Dalhousie lake region.

Toledo, April 3, 1925

Hume Kent has opened his cheese factory for the season.

Owing to temporary cessation of work on the dam in course of construction near Croghan, N.Y., Charles Nichol and Hurbert Cardiff have returned home for a while.

Clifford Eaton, lineman, and his staff are busy re-wiring a telephone line in Shane’s district.

Miss Eva Stratton is enjoying a few days’ visit with her sister, Mrs. Elmer Baldwin, and Mr. Baldwin, of Brockville.

Mrs. R.C. Latimer is suffering from a severe attack of acute indigestion, but at latest report she is slightly improved.

The sugar season is over and the general report is that quality was good, but the season very short.

The members of the Orange Lodge held their monthly meeting on Thursday night.

Herbert Bellamy was in Brockville on Thursday to spend the day with his wife, who is still in the hospital. Mrs. Bellamy is not improving as rapidly as her many friends would wish.

The owners of Perth and Smiths Falls creameries, respectively have been through here recently soliciting patrons for the summer months

The choirs of the different churches are preparing special music for Easter. In addition to the Easter service, the Union church Sunday school will hold a special morning service.

Toledo – Sep 21, 1925

C.Webster of Smiths Falls reciently made a business trip to Toledo.

Mrs. B. McCallum of Montreal is the guest of her sister Mrs. W. Dunham and Mr. Dunham

Dr. A.R. Hurley, Mrs. Hurley and family of Rochester, NY were recient guests here of Mrs. Hurley’s mother, Mrs. Lena Brigginshaw.

Rally Day in the Union Church will be observed a week fom next Sunday, October 4th.

Toledo is again to the front in regard to the school fair held there on Thursday, the 17th inst. The large crowd were keenly interested in the success of the fair and the pupils of the various schools represented made and excellent showing. Toledo won the cup again, being the school with the highest number of points to its credit, while the pupils of that school, under the able management of Miss Murray, won second place in the parade.

Clifford Eaton is busily engaged with his threshing outfit reciently purchased from Egbert Mott of Frankville.

Special services were conducted in St. Philip Neri Church last week. Rev. J.P. Fallon, O.M.I. officiating.

Wilfred Miller of Michigan is visiting at the home of his brother, Mr. and Mrs. L. Miller, also with friends in this vicinity.

Special service was conducted in the Toledo Union Church on Sunday afternoon, 20th inst., when Rev. T.F. Townsend, BA, BD., Union Church pastor, assisted by Rev. G.G. Upham of Athens, Baptist minister held service for the members of the Orange order here and the members of Newbliss ladies lodges, who marched to the church in a body led by Toledo brass band.

A host of friends here are pleased to know that Mrs. T.F.Townsend is progressing slowly but steadily after her recent serious operation.

Miss Mabel Quigley left on September 21st for Ottawa where she purposes attending the Normal School.

Mrs. P.J. Quigley is having a private sale of some household goods after which she intends moving to Ottawa, after visiting some friends in this vicinity for a month or so.

Many friends from this vicinity are sorry to hear of Robert Morrison’s death.

Toledo, Jan 27, 1926

Mrs. M. Weatherhead and Miss Jennie Nichol were recent Athens visitors.

Mr. and Mrs. G.C. Marshall and Miss Lucy Marshall recently entertained at their home the members of certain of the Union Church Sunday school classes, when a most enjoyable time was spent by all.

Mrs. Joseph Jordan, of |Lombardy, was a recent visitor at the home of Mrs. N. Nichol and Miss Jennie Nichol.

Mansell Weatherhead is busily engaged drawing wood to Athens. Fred Seward is drawing logs to Philipsville.

Toledo, Jan 27, 1926

Obituary for William Moran

It was a great shock to the people of this community (Toledo) when the word went forth Sunday afternoon, the 24th inst, that William Moran had passed away after a very brief illness. On Friday he suffered an attack of acute indigestion, but very few knew of it, and on Sunday, to the consternation of his near ones attending him, and to the great surprise of all, he suddenly passed away.

The late Mr. Moran was born in Ireland in 1855, a son of the late Maria Hipson and John Moran and when the boy William was six years old his parents came to Canada and settled in this district, where deceased spent the last years of his life. In his younger days he spent some time in Michigan, also in Western Ontario and later in Smiths Falls. He was an expert cabinet maker and actively followed that vocation up to the day he became ill. He also did considerable work as a painter.

Deceased was the possessor of many sterling qualities, very quiet and unobtrusive in his manner, but ever ready to lend a helping hand when called upon. He was strictly honest and industrious to a fault and in his unassuming way he exerted a great influence for good in this community, where he was held in high esteem. In politics he as a Conservative and in religion was of the Anglican faith.

The late Mr. Moran’s first wife formerly Miss Maria Morrison passed away in 1910. Their two children survive to mourn a loving father: Mrs. G. Gould of Alhambra, Cal., and Mortimer A. Moran of this place. A few years ago he married secondly Miss Cynthia A. Price, who survives also to mourn his loss. Of a family of eight there survive four sisters and one brother: Mrs. Thos. Rae, of Flint, Mich; Mrs. R.C. Russell of Detroit, Mich.; Mrs. Alexander McQueen, of Morefield, Ont.; Mrs. Sanford Morden, of Niagara Falls, NY., and Robert Moran of Alpena, Mich. A brother, John Moran died some time ago, while a sister Mrs. G.R.Mack, of Detroit Mich., passed away last August.

Toldeo, March 8th, 1927

Mr. and Mrs. J. Seymour of Athens were recent guests at the home of Mrs. J. Nichol and Miss Jennie Nichol.

Robert Bruce of Newbliss, township assessor, was through this district recently.

Eber Running, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. S. Running, is ill, threatened with appendicitis. Dr. Kelly, Delta, is in attendance.

Wilfred Bruce has returned from Kingston, where he was attending the dairymen’s class last week.

Mrs. Herbert Bellamy has returned from a week’s visit in Brockville.

Mrs. James Gray was so unfortunate recently as to fall on the ice and fracture her wrist.

The construction of the Brockville- Smiths Falls provincial highway will surely be a reality as soon as weather conditions permit, for the engineers and staff are already marking out lines to be followed. The report circulated that the road it to go just northeast of the village instead of following the present route, is not being received favourably by the people of Toledo and surrounding country.

Me. And Mrs. H.N. Stinson recently entertained the latter’s sister, Mrs. W. Tackaberry, and Mr. Tackaberry of Philipsville.

Miss Irene Gray’s recent very severe cold has developed into bronchitis. She is still confined to bed and is under the care of Dr. Throop, of Frankville

W. Hanton of Jasper, was recently purchasing cows here for the American market.

Miss Ruby Whitmore is able to resume her duties after her recent illness.

Gertrude Walsh is still suffering from a very persistent cold.

Smith Brothers, Frankville, are busily engaged in this section with their portable sawing outfit.

Mrs. Carley and son, Vincent Carley of Frankville were visiting her son Burton Carley in Toledo on Sunday.

Miss Irene Gray was the recipient of a beautiful bouquet of cut flowers, with roses and orchids predominating, from the teacher and members of her Sunday school class.’

The party given last week by Mr. and Mrs. R.R. Eaton was greatly enjoyed by all present. Dancing was the principal amusement of the evening and was indulged in until a late hour.

 Toledo- April 11th , 1927

The well drillers are still busy in this district. Hume Kent is having a well drilled just inside his cheese factory.

Mr. and Mrs. James Walsh were Smiths Falls visitors on Saturday.

Mr. and Mrs. E. Baldwin of Brockville spent Sunday with the latter’s sister and brother, Miss Eva Stratton and E.H. Stratton.

Letford Millar made a business tip to Perth on Saturday.

In spite of the exceptionally long syrup making season, indications mow are for a big run at Easter. A large quantity of most exceptional quality has been manufactured, such big makers as Harold and Herbert Bellamy, H. Dunham, Fred Seward and others reporting several hundred gallons each.

Special music for Easter is being prepared by the choir of the three respective churches here.

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Rowsome, their son, Garnet Rowsome, and the former’s mother, Mrs. E. Rowsome, of Belleville, en route from the home of the latter’s daughter, Mrs. R. Hanton, and Mr. Hanton, of Frankville, where they had spent the week, were calling upon friends in this district on Sunday evening.

Toledo, May 29, 1930

The commercial Hotel, a landmark of Toledo, Saturday morning was destroyed by fire. The building was owned by John McEwen, and was of frame construction. Most of the contents were destroyed. The Smiths Falls Department responded with a truck and hose, and the Frankville engine was also rushed to the scene. The flames however had spread so rapidly that the firemen concentrated their efforts to near-by buildings, some of them being saved with difficulty, the cause of the fire is unknown. It broke out in the kitchen, and while some insurance was carried, the loss will be heavy. This is the second large fire to occur in Toledo within four weeks. Three buildings were destroyed previously. It was the fourth fire in that village in less than a year.

Tin Cap – News from the Village – 1925-1926

 

The Athens Reporter- excerpts have been taken from this newspaper for the years – 1925 to 1926. The original newspapers are in the archives of the Heritage House Museum, Athens, Ontario

 Tin Cap – Feb 27th, 1925

Mrs. Leonard Elliott, Brockville, spent a few days last week visiting her aunt, Mrs. George Boyd.

Fred Wright, Miss Mollie O’Donnell and Miss Myrtle Lyons visited on Tuesday at William O’Donnell’s.

Mrs. Anson Gilroy was called to Hamilton last week by the death of her father, Aquila Hanson.

Mr. and Mrs. B.S. Johnston, Brockville, are visiting the form parents, Mr. and Mrs. D.A. Johnston.

Roy Locke, Brockville is moving his household effects into his new home recently purchased from S. Barker.

Reeve Reuben Davis is in Toronto this week.

Tin Cap, Jan 25th, 1926

Harold Rowsome, recently of the Recorder and Times staff, Brockville, and a former resident of the Tincap, left last week for Ottawa where he has accepted a position in the Civil Service.

Mrs. Robert Marks is visiting in Smiths Falls

Basil Reed is visiting in Bishop’s Mills.

Mr. and Mrs. Reuben Davis celebrated their 40th anniversary of their wedding last week by entertaining a number of friends. Telephone messages and congratulations were received from many distant friends to wish them many more years of happy married life.

W.W. Anderson, Ottawa, visited at Jonas Gilroy’s last week.

Miss Matilda Anderson has been quite ill at her home here.

Redan – News from the Village – 1926

The Athens Reporter- excerpts have been taken from this newspaper for the year – 1926. The original newspapers are in the archives of the Heritage House Museum, Athens, Ontario

Redan , Jan 25th, 1926

Miss Laura Loucks spent the week-end at home in Smiths Falls.

Mrs. Mildred Pritchard has returned after having visited relatives in Westport

Elgin Mott spend Tuesday last in Smiths Falls, a guest of Mrs. George Foster.

Miss C. Young, of Glen Buell, spent Sunday at Horton Young’s.

The farmers in this vicinity are busy getting in their supply of wood.

Lillies – News from the Village – 1927

The Athens Reporter- excerpts have been taken from this newspaper for the years- 1927. The original newspapers are in the archives of the Heritage House Museum, Athens, Ontario

 Lillies, April 16th , 1927

Albert Gardiner is a patient at the General hospital. All are hoping to see him home soon.

Morton Charlton’s auction sale was well attended on Wednesday last.

The farmers are commencing to work on the land.

Miss Florence Booth had her tonsils removed recently at the General hospital, Brockville. All are pleased to learn that she is convalescing rapidly at her home here.

David Lawson purchased a valuable horse from Charles McNish recently.

Dr. and Mrs. F.M. Judson, Lyn, paid the Vickery family a short visit one day last week.

The Misses Mabel and Lois Marshall are guests of their parents, Mr. and Mrs. J.H. Marshall.

Mr. and Mrs. H. Dunster and family, Lyn, spent a day last week at A.H. Hendry’s.

The Misses Gladys Louise, Florence and Margaret Booth are holidaying at their home here.

Mrs. H. Darling spent a day last week with her daughter, Mrs. Morton Charlston.

Jasper – News from the Village – 1926

The Athens Reporter- excerpts have been taken from this newspaper for the years- 1926. The original newspapers are in the archives of the Heritage House Museum, Athens, Ontario

Jasper. April 12, 1926

School re-opened o Monday.

Mrs. Carroll Livingston and daughter Doreen, of Frankville, were guests last week of Mrs. O. Burridge.

Mrs. Mort Davis, Smiths Falls, was the guest of Mrs. Walter Hanton on Friday last.

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Moore and children visited in Kemptville last week.

Miss Pearl Campton spent Sunday with friends in Smiths Falls.

C.A. Pryce is able to be out again having recovered from a bad cold.

Mrs. Harry Bates has returned home from Smiths Falls

Glen Buell – News from the Village

The Athens Reporter and County of Leeds Advertiser

 

Excerpts have been taken from this paper referencing the following hamlet for the years 1889, 1894 and 1895

Glen Buell – Jan 22 1889

There is likely to be a change in the personnel at the Bell Farm managers for the coming season. It is generally understood from hints thrown out by the genial president in his after dinner speech at the annual school meeting that he will be looking for higher honours in the near future. The wily old president was wide awake for his own interests when he made the statement that ‘if his friends and the Reporter stuck to him as closely during the coming year as they did in the past, that he would have no difficulty in securing the position of Reeve of the Township for the year 1890’

Why do we not get a published statement from the proprietor of Glen Buell Cheese factory respecting prices the patrons received for milk and cheese for the year 1888.

 

Glen Buell: Saturday Jan 26th, 1889-

Early Friday afternoon, Professor David and a number of the Eureka Troop arrived in town and at once began active preparations in Manufacture’s Hall of the concert that evening. Old January, with all his faults favored the troop and all interested with a fine night for the occasion. At half-past seven nearly every possible seat in the room was occupied, excepting the one arranged for the Professor of Music, who had not arrived from Addison. However after a few minutes delay he claimed his chair, and Prof. David appeared on stage and made his maiden speech which was, as the school boy remarked, just right- short and sweet. The programme for the evening was complete and remarkably well rendered by the Troopers. The play of Aunt Polly visiting the Grove was excellent.

The part played by ‘Betsey Ann’ in the dialogue, ‘The Mysterious Box’ was well received by all present.

The recitations given by Mrs. D.J.Forth and Miss. Mande Addison were remarkably well rendered and well received. The music for the occasion was all that could be desired. We are free to admit that the concert under Prof. David’s management was a success.

‘Jolly John’ upon enquiry found that he was acquainted with Manager David. Secro Snowflake was the worst specimen of humanity that we ever saw. Master Handsome performed his art with credit. The darkey who managed the curtain was a little fresh. Receipts were good.

 

 

Glen Buell– Monday March 4th 1889. We notice with pleasure that our cousins of the progressive Methodist Church are getting large quantities of building material for their new synagogue. The trustee board have secured from Boyd Hall, Esq. a valuable lot on Main Street, nearly opposite the family residence of the General Superintendent of the Bell Farm Syndicate Co.

Mr.John Sturgeon ad wife are enjoying their annual vacation among friends and relatives near Carleton Place.

Our Butcher Boy, of the East End has provided himself with a black-thorn stick, in preparation for the Donnybrook Fair, to be held on the 17th inst.

 

Glen Buell, Monday, March 25th1889

For a length of time our Glen Buell people have not had a practical shoemaker. We are pleased, however, to notice that John Earl Jr., has purchased the tools, stock in trade, and good-will of the old cobbler’s business and opened up a shop on Earl St. Mr. Earl is a young man of good industrious habits has served three or four years in a large concern in Belleville, Ont., and is qualified to look after the business of this line of trade. Give him an order and thus encourage this young man.

Death, that old enemy of man, recently entered the family residence of Mr. E. Westlake, Point Edward and claimed his victim their youngest child, Dora, about three years old.

Miss. Turney has arrived home after a pleasant vacation of two weeks among her many friends at Lombardy.

Our public school board deserve much credit for the choice made by them in the selection of a teacher for the present term. She is an active, energetic, wide awake teacher. She has charge of about forty children in the public school, runs a private class two nights in the week, attends church without fail on the Sabbath, and entertains her friends in the evening.

Mr. H. Sandford and his wife, who have held very important positions in connection with the celebrated Bell Farm Company, have removed to Smith’s Falls. The lack of their company, counsel, and advice on questions of importance, will be keenly felt by the president.

 

 

Glen Buell, Monday April 1st  1889

A few weeks ago, a lady from Chipmuck Valley called on the owner of Charity Island and informed her that owing to the changed condition of her finances, consequent upon the successful termination of her suit for back-number alimony, against the estate of the deceased millionaire, she had decided to retire from active participation in poultry raising, and was prepared to dispos of the greater portion of her stock. After considerable haggling, a bargain was struck and part of the purchase money was advanced. O her arrival home the Chipmuck Valley lady found a lady from Dogtown waiting to see her with a view to purchasing the same lot of bipeds to which end she offered 25 cents more than the first purchaser. The offer was accepted, and the fowl were at once removed to the genial climate of Dogtown. When the Charity Island lady drove over to take home her purchase, she was blandly told that the tempting offer of the Dogtown lady had secured the geese. A feeling of chagrin at being beaten out of a good bargain by a younger lady, and the desire to make the original owner squirm, prompted the lady to offer 50 cents more than the last purchaser. A happy thought struck the recipient of the millionaire’s bounty. Here was a fine chance to win renown in the field of diplomacy. She told the would be purchaser to go home contented and she would have the fowl, and straightway hired away to the happy possessor of the much sought after property. With demure face she announced that there would be a lot of trouble if she could not get the fowl back for Charity Island. After a long and animated discussion, the original owner of the fowl secured a promise that upon the return of the deposit money the coveted geese should be turned over to the Charity Island lady. Late that evening a team was sent from Charity Island for the fowl. Arrived at Dogtown the teamster was beguiled with entertaining conversation, while the ex butcher hastily placed the web footed squawkers in a basket and carried them to the sleigh. Returning to Charity Island the tired and sleepy teamster took the fowl from the basket and placed them in a shed with some more of their species. The lateness of the hour and tired condition of the favourite son did not prevent him from noticing the fowl felt as if they had been sent out into the cold without their full quota of nature’s covering, and on entering the house he remarked that the geese had a mighty thin covering for the time of the year. Next morning the poor geese were found in a deplorable plight and had to be carried in and thawed out at the kitchen stove. Thereafter they were kept in the cellar for three weeks and blanketed. Your correspondent discovered that the Goose Pickers Association of Dogtown had met on the afternoon of the final sale and transfer, and anonymously resolved to pick the fowl clean, in order that the purchaser number two might be cheated out of the downy feathers.

 

Glen Buell– May 7 1889

We hope to be able to give your readers a short account of how work is progressing on the Bell Farm next week. The genial president has returned from Charleston Lake, where he had been superintending the building of the stairs in the new Armstrong House,

The deputy toll taker is in trouble again. It is said that a man hailing from the classic city out by the “gagin’ canaul” [sic] in a fit of absentmindedness drove trough the tollgate without paying the fee. The deputy made up his mind that he had been cheated out of his lawful dues times enough; so hastily ordered one of the subordinates on the farm to hitch up a horse, he started after the delinquent at a break neck pace. Which about a mile on the road to Athens, he succeeedes by his wild and almost frantic shouting and gesticulations in attracting the attention of the traveller.  A bait was made, and when Richard drove up the traveler mildly asked what was the matter. “You haven’t paid to toll” blurted out Richard. “Oh! I’m so sorry to have given you trouble, but I quite forgot all about it.” Said the traveller. “To what part of the globe are you bound ?” asked Richard. “I’m bound for Frankville” quoth the traveller. “Then you are on the wrong road.” Said the deputy, and thereupon both turned around and retraced their way to Unionville. Arriving at the crossroad, Richard pointed out the way, when, with many thanks from the traveler sped on his journey. All at once a bewildering thought struck the deputy. Here he had been and gone fully a mile after an entire stranger, in order to collect a toll, and had expended a lot of wind in trying to make him stop. Then he had befriended him by pointing out the right way, and all he had received in return was a very polite “Thank You.” And the way he spurted back and forth between the toll bar and the provision counter was sad to behold.

 

 

Saturday July 20- 1889

Dr. Jas. H. Hall, an old Glen Buell boy well known here, is meeting with much success in New York city, He graduated with honors from the Medical Missionary Institute, and afterwards was placed in charge of a dispensary at Castle Garden, a position requiring much arduous labor. I addition to this post, the doctor has charge of the Tremont Hospital. Dr. Hall is a young man of industry and ability and we predict for him a very useful career in the medical missions of the Flowery Empire, to which he intends devoting his life.

 

Tuesday Oct 30, 1894 issue-

Glen Buell– Monday Oct 29. Much interest was taken in the result of the great squirrel hunt of last week between ye men of the woods who are lovers of the gun and residents of Spring Valley. They issued a challenge to the red men of the glen to go into a friendly competition in order that the fact of superior skills might be made known to the public.

 

Tuesday Nov 20, 1894 issue-   (date show is the date on the paper, not the correct date)

Glen Buell, Nov 26-

Some time ago Ethiopean John, while rusticating in the woods back of Glossville, came across a very large black bear. Having no weapon and lacking sufficient courage to attack him single handed, he retreated to the house of his host, the well known steam threshing machine man, where be succeeded in getting a gun and the assistance of ‘Forgie’ to help slay the dangerous animal. Throwing off the governor belt they soon arrived at the scene of his bearship, but, lo ! to their amazement, the bear turned out to be a large black cat. Score one for John who says that his eyes must have magnified that cat.

On Thursday last a number of our young people spent a very enjoyable evening at the residence of Mr. Geo. Hall.

The social under the auspices of the Epworth League will be held in the schoolhouse next Thursday evening. Besides refreshments there will be a good programme of recitations, songs, etc. A good time is anticipated.

 

Tuesday Jan. 1, 1895 issue-

Glen Buell

Mr. John Westlake is seriously ill

Miss Louise Earl is home from Chicago visiting her parents.

Anther member is added to the family of Mr. Jno. Lee of Reynard Valley.

Our local cheese makers, Messrs Jas. Kirkland and Sheldon Hudson are home for the winter. They both look hale and hearty.

On Wednesday, Dec 19, one of our most popular young men in the person of Mr. Alvin Gilroy was united in marriage to Miss. Lena Yates of Athens. Rev. Mr. Perley conducted the ceremony. We wish the young couple a happy, prosperous journey through life.

Some enterprising agent could find ready sale for a couple of hand organ of the improved kind. No cranks would be required with the articles, as we are well supplied with these and they are of musical nature too.

The entertainment which took place on Wednesday, Dec 19th, was a grand success. The children who took part in it showed that their instructors, Mrs. Forth and Miss. Clow, did their utmost to make entertainment as pleasing and interesting as possible. The recitations by Misses Towriss, Henderson, Orton and Whaley, and Mesrs. Lynn and Stewart were given in their usual good style and gave evidence that thre is no lack of talent in that direction here. The musical part played no small share towards making the entertainment a success. We beg leave to thank the Addison orchestra for the choice selections rendered by them. The instrumental music furnished by Master Allen Lapointe showed marked ability and as time advances we hope to see him one of the shinning lights in the musical world. The Christmas tree fairly groaned under its weight of presents for the children. After receiving these a treat of nuts and candies was given them, and all went home feeling happy. Before closing we must not forget to thank genial John Yates for the very able manner in which he filled the chair.

 

 

Tuesday Jan. 8, 1895 issue-

Glen Buell – Saturday, January 5-

For some time in the past the ex-champion of the ring, who has lately put himself into training for the final match with his dusky foe, has been of the opinion that trailing the cunning fox alone and unobserved does not impart the necessary muscle and ambition to spread the colored man over the arena in three rounds. Acting upon these convictions, he decided to make a grand fox hunt through the holidays and sweep the game in some foreign locality out of existence and, as the artist of North Augusta gave such a glowing account of the magnificent game where he came from, the land of his nativity was selected as the scene of the slaughter- Great were the preparations made for the feasting and merry making of the party and for the proper care of the hounds when they reached the hunting grounds. The shades of the evening were beginning to fall when the party started from Pt. Edward, the ex-champion riding with the artist, who acted as a guide. After passing the B&W crossing the artist awoke to the fact that he was not foremost of the caravan, and as the most distinguished should always lead he decided to get there or hurt someone in the attempt, but soon found out to his disappointment that his camel wasn’t quick enough. This might be accounted for, however, as the animal transported a very heavy load consisting of, besides the two men (both heavy weights), “Watch” the famous bloodhound out of Dogtown, a quarter of horsemeat, a turkey and several other stables named in the bill of fare, too numerous to mention. But a happy thought struck the artist and instead of following the trail around to the Glen, as the others had done, he took the cross track between the White House and Pt. Peter. They had not gone far on this trail, however when the ex-champion, in his excitement imagining that he was in close pursuit of a fox, began to sway his massive frame from side to side in the endeavour to get a glimpse of the fleeting visions and in doing this rocked over the cutter and all therein was thrown violently into a snow bank. The artist pluckily held on to the reins for a few rods sweeping enough snow off the road to give him a good recommendation to the managers of the BW as a snow plow. The ex-champion fell on Watch burying him in the snow, but as soon as he had dug his way out he started for home at a rate that would distance the swiftest fox. The runaway horse ran into a farm yard , then on a lane where he freed himself from the cutter and started for the North Pole, but after getting over its fright it decided to remain in Canada and stopped in the shade of some bushes until it was discovered by some of the party soon afterwards. The animal was brought back to the cutter, which was but slightly injured. A little hay wire was ut into use and all was soon in good running order again. Its cargo was reloaded, all except Watch and ex-champion, who refused the invitation to again recline on the downy robes.

As yet we have not heard the result of the chase, but suspect that the slaughter of game was great. We think however, if excitement imparts strength to the ex-champion the colored champion in the coming match will be scattered to the four winds of the earth.

 

Tuesday Jan. 22, 1895 issue-

The proprietor of the Model farm at Mt. Pleasant has been engaged for the past week hauling wood from his timber limit at Glen Buell.

 

Tuesday Jan. 29, 1895 issue-

Jack Westlake, and old and respected resident of Glen Buell, died on Sunday evening. Funeral takes place at the Methodist church, Glen Buell, to-day (Tuesday) at half past eleven o’clock.

 

Tuesday April 16, 1895 issue

Glen Buell, Monday, April 15,-

7,000 lbs. of milk were taken in on Monday, April 15, at our factory here. This amount speaks well for the cheese-maker N.Stewart, who is a general favourite.

Parker Seaman has moved to a small place near Borne, N.Y., where he will have charge of a cheese and butter factory.

The funeral of the late Mrs. Bennet Towriss took place last Sunday at our church. An able and eloquent sermon was preached by Rev. Mr. Hagar of Athens, from Rev., 14 Chap., 13 vs. Mrs. Towriss was a daughter of the late Jerry Bullis and was born in this neighbourhood. She was in the 54th year of her age, and was a strong healthy woman until about a year ago when she was taken with diabetes from which complaint she died on Friday night last.

Lillian Hall and Albert Sturgeon are spending their Easter holidays at home. We are sorry to hear that the later met with quite an accident in the sugar bush by cutting his foot severely with an ax.

A number of our farmers are shipping maple syrup to the west.

If the farmers depended on rain water for making maple syrup, a vast quantity would be made.

We see the genial face of Mr. Moorhouse in our midst again. Welcome back, John.

 

Tuesday April 30, 1895 issue

Glen Buell– Monday, April 29.-

A new bicycle in town

The Epworth League was conducted by Miss Towriss last Friday evening.

The Rev. C.F. Buker was visiting friends at the Hall last week.

The result of the fishing party of last week was that Mr. N. Stewart caught a severe cold and was very ill for a few days.

Sawing machines are something of the past. The boys expect to get their board next week.

The bicycle owned by H.Lynn met with an accident the other evening and was taken up to Galillee to be repaired, but the professor’s skill not being sufficient for the task he was obliged to return it to the owner.

 

Tuesday June 25, 1895 issue

There was a large number of Friends passed through (New Dublin) here on Wednesday to attend the funeral of Mrs. Joseph Hayes of Glen Buell.

 

Tuesday July 9, 1895 issue

Glenn Buell, Monday, July 8 –

The long wished for rain has come at last. Though too late to help the hay, it will do unlimited good.

Mrs. Alvin Gilroy is convalescent

C.J. Gilroy our worthy postmaster is on an extended tour up West, after having placed and imbecile boy, brought up by T. Whitford, in the asylum maintained in Orillia.

Four people from our school tried entrance examinations at Athens. This speaks well in favour of Miss Booth the teacher seeing that no pupil has tried the entrance for four years. Glen Buell is to be congratulated on securing the services of so efficient a teacher.

Mrs. Dr. W.J. Hall is daily expected.

 

Tuesday July 16, 1895 issue

Glen Buell– Monday July 8. –

Mrs. G.A. Gilroy has been suffering very badly with quinsy, but we are glad to be able to say she is much better and has gone to Athens to spend a few days with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J.F. Yates

Mr. Howard Moorehouse has also been suffering with quinsy, but is on the road to recovery.

We think there is another house in this neighbourhood that ought to have outside windows on, to keep it calm inside, as the neighbors can hear every time they have a big storm; so, if it would be of any benefit to them (as it certainly would do the neighbors) we would advise them, by all means to have them put on, or at least close their shutters so that the language of the much respected lady of the house will not disturb the slumbers of the public, as it has a very bad influence on the young, and we will then hope that there will be no more straw set afire or calves killed.

Ethiopian John has changed his occupation from a farmer to barber, so that any person having the misfortune of getting one side of his whiskers pulled out can get them all trimmed up equal to Mr. McLaughlin, free of charge.

Mr. C.J.Gilroy and Master Willie Whitford are taking a trip to Orillia and write that they are having a very pleasant time.

 

Tuesday July 16, 1895 issue

Glen Buell Monday, July 15,

Most of the farmers in this vicinity have finished haying. It is not necessary to say that many of the farmers are already buying hay.

Miss Stella Orton was the only successful candidate from this school in the late entrance exams.

Mr. John Anderson met with quite an accident the other day by his horses trying to run away with the mowing machine. At first it was thought that he was seriously injured, but he escaped with some serious bruises on his leg and is now able to walk around.

Miss Minnie T. Sturgeon has returned home from attending the high school in Harriston

Mr. Fawcett of Drayton is on an extended visit in this vicinity.

Mr. Robert Latimer is still on he sick list. We miss him very much in the church.

The pulpit here was ably filled last Sunday by Rev. Mr. Warren who preached an eloquent sermon from Gal.VI: 7 and 8

 

Tuesday July 30, 1895 issue

Mr. and Mrs. G.A. Gilroy of Glen Buell visited at R.J. Sturgeon’s (Fairfield East) on Sunday last.

 

Tuesday July 30, 1895 issue

Glen Buell Monday, July 22 –

Dr. Rosetta Sherwood Hall, (wife of the late Rev. W.J. Hall, medical missionary in Corea [sic]) and family have arrived safely at Glen Buell, the home of his Canadian parents. She has one son and daughter, small children. She has also two native Coreans with her, Mr. Pak and wife. Mrs. Pak assisted Mrs. Hall in her medical mission work in Corea considerably, and is brought to America by Mrs. Hall to be educated as a full fledged doctor of medicine, then go to her native country and thus be in a position to get very much nearer to her sister Coreans in need than any foreigner can hope . Ever since it became known that Mrs. Hall would return from Corea to her native home at Liberty, N.Y., the very many friends of Wm. J. Hall M.D. have been looking forward with much interest to the arrival of his wife and children at Glen Buell. Preparations are being made for a public welcome of the beloved Doctor’s wife and children in the beautiful little church, in the building of which the doctor was an earnest and most willing helper. Wednesday evening, July 31st, has been set apart for that purpose. Any

person wishing to see and hear Mrs. Hall and her Corean friends would do well to embrace the opportunity, which is one of a life time.

Wm. Karley, wife and children of Montreal are at present enjoying their vacation at the home of our genial friend, D.J. Forth.

Considerable interest is now manifested in the preparations for the coming camp meeting in Forth’s grove.

Miss Orton, of the White House, has gone east on a holiday visit.

 

Tuesday July 30, 1895 issue

Glen Buell Saturday, July27 –

Mrs. Dr Hall and children, also a Corean [sic] and his wife, have arrived from New York City, to visit her father-in-laws, Mr. George Hall’s

Mrs. R.G. Sturgeon has gone to Algonquin to spend a few days with her sister, Ms. Henry Greene, and will visit the Brockville asylum and other prominent places on her way home.

We feel in duty bound to warn our friends of the danger of eating much canned fruit and vegetables, as one person in the vicinity has been very ill for so doing.

Mrs. Milton Dancy has returned from Elgin where she has been visiting friends for the last two weeks.

The wolf is still prowling around, and though treated to a dose of shoe leather, it is still fared that he will yet capture one of the tender lambs.

 

Tuesday Sep 3, 1895 issue

Miss Jennie Goodall of Glen Buell is the guest of Misses DeWolfe, Reid st.

 

Tuesday Sep 3, 1895 issue

Glen Buell, Saturday, Aug. 31. –

Mr. George Gibson and Lady of Mallorytown passed through our village last week en route to visit friends at Addison

The camp meeting held here has been the saviour of life to many. One good sister from Frankville says she is going to carry the fire home with her, as there is much need of it in her village. We hope the fruits of her labours may be blest and many be brought to the Saviour.

Mr. C.J. Gilroy and son shipped their celebrated heard of choice thoroughbred cattle on this morning’s train to the Kingston exhibition.

One of our north wards citizens claims to be the champion curd-eater of this section. A pound a day is putting it mild.

A couple of King street gents from Addison passed through our village recently enquiring the way to Jerico. After some deliberation it was decided to go by Brock’s. Arriving at their destination all right, they had a good time, only they frightened the good matron a little by their sudden appearance on the scene. We wish them every success.

Great preparations are being made for our fair this season, which promises to be the best ever held.

 

Tuesday Sep 10, 1895 issue

New Dublin, Monday, Sept.9. –

It is currently reported here that the junior curd official of Glen Buell made an excursion west to Lake street with a beautiful little maid in her teens. While in the house some little trouble arose whereby our beloved son of the Glen had a special mark placed on his beautiful face. We advise the junior to be careful in future about entering upon new fishing grounds.

 

Tuesday Oct 15, 1895 issue

Glen Buell, Friday, Oct 11. –

Miss Lucy Hall is away visiting friends at Almonte.

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Greene visited at R.G. Sturgeon’s on Sunday last.

There is a certain lady in our village who is very curious to know who the Glen Buell correspondent is. She interviewed the Dogtown dairyman some time ago, and silenced him, and she now accuses our Glen Buell dairyman. So, beware, Mr Editor, and don’t give her my name; for woe betides me if she knew it.

Mr. and Mrs. W.H. Davis have been visiting friends in Detroit for the past week.

Mr. and Mrs. R.J. Sturgeon made a flying visit through here one day last week.

Mr. and Mrs. B.S. McConnell and sister assisted in our choir last Sunday.

Any person wishing to engage a first class gardener can see one at Paul’s Point almost any time.

Potato digging is the order of the day now. The latest and best way of drawing them in is to put a barrel on your chain boat and then hitch your Ayrshire cow to it.

Advertisement from October 1895 newspaper

 

 

 

Elizabethtown-Kitley Fire Department

“Edna’s Scrapbook”

is a paperback book written by Edna B. Chant and was published in 1998. Edna Chant was a reported with the “Athens Reporter” for 23 years and she is the author of four books.

Her book, which is made up of news clippings from various sources, from which we have taken excerpts, gives us a glimpse into life in our area for over a hundred year period ending with stories from 1975.

While her book covers many areas of Leeds and Grenville we have only focused on the area within Elizabethtown-Kitley Township.

 

Elizabethtown Fire Department

The Eizabethtown Volunteer Fire Department based at Lyn has an interesting history showing what a group of citizens can do if they put their minds to it. The project of forming a fire department was proposed at a meeting of the Lyn Community Club and on March 18, 1963 a meeting was held at the home of Arnold Ladd at which five men were appointed to form a committee to be the future Fire Department slate of officers. They were Arnold Ladd, chairman; Ivan Cross, Herb Simpson, Gerald Coon, Elton Tennant. In April a public meeting was held in the Lyn School when 24 men signed up offering their services as firefighters. The Township Council accepted these names proposed and approved the appointment of David McCrady as Fire Chief. Meetings were held every two weeks and many ways to make money were used such as dances, raffles and an auction sale. The first item of equipment purchased was a pumper truck on June 10, 1963 and they also got a 1957 oil tank and converted it to a water tank truck holding 1,300 gallons of water. The Township Council gave $1000. to purchase equipment and Fire Chief McCrady donated the land, the Township Council bought the material and the fireman did the work and a fire hall was erected. In 1964 a panel truck was purchased and by 1967 they had a new station wagon, two Scott air packs, two portable pumps, 5000 feet of hose, extension ladders, coats, hats, rubber-boots, uniforms for 25 men and they sent 14 men to attend Fire College at Gravenhurst. On September 5, 1967 Fire Chef McCrady resigned and was replaced by Deputy Chief George Williams and Ivan Cross was appointed Deputy Chief. Elizabethtown Township is justly proud of their Fire Department which now has modern radio equipment and an enlarged fire hall with a kitchen.

On July 18, 1966 a circus sponsored by the Lyn Firefighters Association was greatly enjoyed by both adults and children alike. But they were given a thrill they will never forget when one of the trapeze artists fell 50 feet from a high bar to the ground below. No net was being used. Women screamed and men jumped to their feet when Carmen Del Molion, a Spanish artist was seen to fall. She lay motionless on the ground as circus attendants rushed to her aid. She was carried to her trailer where she was attended by a doctor. It was later announced that no bones were broken but she was badly bruised and shaken up.

 

Kitley Fire Department

A new Kitley Fire Hall at Frankville was officially opened on July 23, 1966. Reeve Charlie Sands was master of ceremonies. Present were Reeve Borden Hutchings of North Crosby; Reeve E.A. McGregor of Westport; Reeve Wally Heffernan of Rear of Younge and Escott and Reeve Edgar Bresse of Newboro as well as Warden Donald Ferguson, Reeve Ernest Miller, Front of Younge; Fire Chief Dave McCrady, Elizabethtown; Fire Chief Edgar Fagan, Smiths Falls; Fire Chief Robert Bell, Augusta, Fire Chief Gerald Wing, Westport; members of Kitley Fire Department are Fire Chief Gerald Moran, Deputy Fire Chief Gerald Sands, Captain’s Gerald Mercier and Ray Ireland.

 

Unknown House on fire, Lyn Ontario

 

 

 

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Lyn’s First Fire Hall

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Mack Stack standing in front of Lyn’s first Fire Hall

 

 

 

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The end of Lyn’s first fire hall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Elizabethtown Fire Department Building in Lyn c1963
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Elizabethtown Fire Department building in Lyn c 1992

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Fire Trucks c1993
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Elizabethtown Fire Truck 1971
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Elizabethtown Fire Truck 1963

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Chiefs D. White; G.Williams and D.McCrady
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Fire Hall Meeting April 1963
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Fire Extraction Team 2005
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Elizabethtown Fire Department Team 1993
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Lyn Fire Hall in 1993
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Chief George Williams
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Firefighters c1968, Reeve Don Ferguson in the middle

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Everything’s here except the phone number

 

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Elizabethtown Firefighters c 2000

 

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Miller’s Store Fire Sept 1990, Main St in Lyn
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Miller’s Store Fire
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Miller’s Store Fire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Norman and Sarah Mattice, house fire on Chemical Rd May 25, 1954
Chemical Road House Fire, Recorder and Times Newspaper May 25, 1954

 

 

 

 

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Vanlterson House Fire on the Howard Road 1974
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Watso Residence Fire, Lyn Jan 29, 1957
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Unknown Structure Fire
Fire of Ida Kane’s House at the Corner of Laura and Church Sts., Lyn. Pictured is Louis Kane, girl is unknown. Photo c1955

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Glen Buell – A Hamlet in Elizabethtown

Glen Buell  (Hayes Corners)

2-glen-buell

This quiet hamlet on Highway 29, nine miles north of Brockville has a long and chequered history dating back to 1787. Back then it was wilderness dotted by farms and homesteads of the early settlers. It is located where Hwy 29 crosses the Seventh Concession of Elizabethtown,

 

Originally known as Hayes Corners, from the numerous Hayes families which lived here, the hamlet was given the name of Glen Buell in the late 1800’s. No one knows for sure how Glen Buell was named; although the Buell name was well know in Brockville and district.

 

 

Old timers recalled that years ago the Brockville and Westport Railway line cut through a shallow rock outcropping, and the rock cut was known as “the Glen”. A board fence at the rock cut protected the tracks from winter snowdrifts. So it is possible someone joined “Glen” and “Buell” to create the name.

The Hayes family settled at this corner around 1805. Family tradition says the Hayes were closely related to Rutherford Hayes (1822-1893) , 19th president of the United States. The Hayes migrated here from Connecticut.

In the 1840’s Glen Buell must have been fairly populous, for 17 year old teacher Peter Booth reported in 1842 that he had 63 pupils in his one room country school. Booth the first teacher estimated there were as many more eligible students in the area.

The first known record relating to the Glen Buell area is the deed granting Lot No. 28, Seventh Concession of Elizabethtown to Henry Clow on November 5, 1787.  (Recorder and Times c1980, Darling Book #3)

 

The Hayes Family (Leavitt)

Eri Hayes, Sr. was born in Connecticut, December 6th, 1780, his parents being Ashael and Anna Hayes. In 1796, Eri removed to Canada and in 1805 he settled on Lot No 32 in the 6th Concession of Elizabethtown; he afterwards purchased 35 acres at the place known as Hayes’ Corners. Mr. Hayes married Anne, daughter of David Derbyshire. In 1807 the parents of Mr. Hayes came to Elizabethtown, locating on Lot 30 in the 5th Concession. Eri died in 1839, his wife surviving until 1860. His family consisted of the following children: Eri Jr. born January 24th 1808, married Betsey daughter of Benoni Wiltse; Carmi, born in 1810, married Mary, daughter of Neil Palmer; he died at Grand Rapids in 1876; Daniel born in 1811, married Deborah, daughter of Daniel Wing; Ira, born in 1815, died in 1844; Chauncy, born in 1816, married a daughter of William Knowles.glen-buell-jos-hayes-leavitt-pg-146

 

Joseph Hayes was born May 10th 1818; he resides on the homestead. In 1839 he married Thankful, daughter of Gardiner Lee, by whom he has ha five children. Mrs. Hayes dying in 1850, Mr. Hayes married for his second wife, Emily, daughter of the late Rosewell Rowley of Elizabethtown. Mr. Hayes’ family consisted of the following children: Ervin, who died in Michigan in 1874, leaving a widow and two children; Eri Jr. born in 1844, married Louisa daughter of John Cummings of Elizabethtown; William born in 1846, resides in Michigan; Charles , born in 1848, married a daughter of James Cummings of Lansdowne; Emeline, born in 1850 married Solomon Rowley of Elizabethtown.

Eri Hayes, Sr. had the following daughters: Sarah married Albert Blanchard; Orilla resides in Iowa.

(History of Leeds and Grenville by Thad. Leavitt pub 1879)

 

Methodist Church

Glen Buell Methodist Church- The land for this church was bought in 1888 from Boyd Hall and his wife. The church was built in 1890 with William Gray and Edmund Westlake as carpenters. The bricks used to build this church were brought from Lyn. They were from the Wesleyan Methodist Church in Lyn which was blown down during a storm in 1888.

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Original Interior
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Glen Buell Church c1980

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Glen Buell Church – photo 2015
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Interior looking to the back of the church – photo 2015
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Interior looking to the front of the church -photo 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Purchased at a garage sale in the region.
Glen Buell Store and Post Office c1890 , this is a ‘glass plate photograph’
Purchased at a garage sale in the region.
Glen Buell Store and Post Office c1890
Purchased at a garage sale in the region.
Glenn Buell Post Office and Store c1890 facing Highway 29, north of the church
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House at Glen Buell c1890
Purchased at a garage sale in the region.
House at Glen Buell c1890

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Purchased at a garage sale in the region.
Canoeing on Lamb’s Pond c1890
Purchased at a garage sale in the region.
Lamb’s Pond c1890

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Counties Map of 1998
Purchased at a garage sale in the region.
Glen Buell School, c1890- located facing Hwy 29, south of the intersection, the school was torn down in the 1980’s

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Glen Buell Cemetery steps on Hwy 29 -photo 2016
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Glen Buell Cemetery – photo 2016
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Glen Buell Cemetery – photo 2016

Glen Buell Cheese Factory

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In the spring of 1881, Mr.C.J.Gilroy erected the cheese factor which is illustrated at the head of the article. The cut is from a pencil sketch by our special artist and was engraved especially for the columns of the Reporter.

The making room is 28×32 feet, is well arranged and under the efficient supervision of Mr. B.S McConnell, is so well kept and clean that there is scarcely color enough to indicate the business carried on in the room. The drying room is 20×40 feet. On the day of our visit there were between 75 and 100 cheese on the shelves which had a remarkably fine and uniform appearance. The whey house is a separate building in the top of which are the vats for the storage of whey. A steam injector forces the whey into these tanks, from which the drawers get their supply under cover.

This spring Mr. Gilroy threw out the old boiler and supplied its place with a fine new one of 16 horse power, and in order to make room for it and a large water reservoir, he enlarged the engine room to more than twice the size shown in the cut.

The factory is now in its eleventh year and under Mr. Gilroy has steadily increased in business and popularity until this season he is making up the milk from 586 cows. He assured our representatives that this large number of cows was obtained without driving a mile or canvassing a single person for their milk. We understand it is Mr.Gilroy’s intention in putting in te large boiler to heat the building with steam and thus paving the way for making up to the 1st of January each year.

Mr. Gilroy is and has been the efficient secretary of the Brockville Dairymen’s Board of Trade for several years, a position he occupies to the satisfaction of the cheese men and credit to himself. He is also the proprietor of a finely arranged country store, is postmaster of Glen Buell, and runs a large farm in connection with his other business. He is also identified in active church work and the fine new brick church, now nearly completed, owes its inception and present location in a large measure to the untiring energy and zeal of Mr. Gilroy. On the day of our visit a number of the farmers from the vicinity were busily engaged helping Mr. Gilroy plant some very fine ornamental trees in front of the church lot. It is expected that the church will be ready of dedication in a short time, when we hope to be able to give a short synopsis of the opening as well as a cut of the building.

We may add in some conclusion that the neighbourhood of Glenn Buell is peopled with a class of farmers whose comfortable condition, industrious habits, genial disposition, and courteous intercourse with each other are very commendable. These are the sterling qualities which go to form the basis of Ontario’s intellectual, social and financial greatness.

Article from the May 10, 1892 issue of the “Athens Reporter”

Edna’s Scrapbook”

is a paperback book written by Edna B. Chant and was published in 1998. Edna Chant was a reported with the “Athens Reporter” for 23 years and she is the author of four books.

Her book, which is made up of news clippings from various sources, from which we have taken excerpts, gives us a glimpse into life in our area for over a hundred year period ending with stories from 1975.

While her book covers many areas of Leeds and Grenville we have only focused on the area within Elizabethtown-Kitley Township.

Glen Buell

The new Methodist Church at Glenn Buell was built in 1890 and 91. The mason was James Walker of Algonquin. All the limestone used for the foundation, base, corners and sill were taken from the old Methodist Church at Lyn and redressed by Charlie Denny stone cutter of Athens.

A well known Glen Buell resident, Walter Darling, was drowned in Watertown, NY on July 1, 1893. He was employed in Brockville as a bookkeeper. The body was brought to his home at Glen Buell where the funeral was held.

Mrs. Sarah Collins of Glen Buell, aged 87 years, has been a very active woman and hard worker both inside and out. On May 10, 1897 she was carrying a mattress upstairs when she dropped dead with the mattress on top of her. She had carried it down a few hours before and out it out in the sun to air.

Milo Lee of Glen Buell died in a mysterious way on April 8, 1897. He was repairing a windmill for George Elwood and was at the top of it, when his body was seen to be hanging by one arm. He made no reply to shouts from the ground so Mr. Elwood climbed up to see what was wrong, and found he was dead. Help was soon on hand and it was with great difficulty that the body was lowered to the ground. He had slipped his arm through a brace at the top and this had prevented him from falling down.

Just five minutes after the teacher at Glen Buell schoolhouse called her pupils in after recess, a high wind blew the roof off of the school, on April 21, 1909. If the children had been in the yard some might have been killed.

On July 12, 1915 a Ford car driven by T.J.McConnell of Lyndhurst was struck by the B&W train at Glen Buell crossing. Passengers in the car were Mrs. George Rooney, her son Travers, Miss. Alma Graham and Miss. Beatrice Webster. All were thrown out except the driver who had a fractured leg. He was sent to hospital in Brockville. Dr. Roy Donovan of Brockville was on the train and he attended the injured. The ladies had cuts and bruises. Miss. Graham required stitches to her face and knee. The driver and all his passengers said the train did not whistle. It was raining at the time and the car top was up and the side curtains closed. The car was damaged beyond repair.

November 18, 1919 the Glen Buell Cheese Factory was burned.

The house and barn of Burton Baxter at Glen Buell were burned on October 16, 1930. The cows were saved but everything else was destroyed. A year ago another barn owned by Mr. Baxter was burned.

On August 31, 1953 Robert Perkins age 72 years was instantly killed on the highway near his home at Glen Buell when a farm tractor he was driving was struck by a car driven by J.B. Kelly of Athens.

In September 1958 the Glen Buell Church was saved from burning by the quick action of neighbours. Mrs. Melvyn Benton went into the church to place flowers in memory of her mother. When she opened the door she was met by the flames. She ran to a nearby house and rang the fire alarm system which worked well, as in a very short time help was coming from all directions. The stove sitting just inside the door burned its shape into the floor when a leg on the old woodstove gave way and the stove fell over on its side. The church board are going to order an oil burner.

Three persons died in a two car head on crash at Glen Buell on November 15, 1967. Mr. and Mrs. Philip Pereira of Athens were returning from an auction sale near Lyn when their car was in collision with a car driven by Joseph Burke of Ottawa, who was accompanied by his wife. Mrs. Pereria and Mr. and Mrs. Burke were killed. Mr. Pereira was seriously injured. Both cars were wrecked.

Forthton – A Hamlet in Elizabethtown

Forthton (Unionville)

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Map of 1861-62

John Kilborn and his wife Elizabeth Baldwin established a store at Unionville about 1816. He was also given a government post assisting settlement of immigrants. Many of the early residents of the Perth area passed through his hands. The settlers travelled overland by wagon and in some cases had to cut their own roads through the forests. John Kilborn was a 17 year old store clerk in Brockville when the War of 1812 broke out. He immediately enlisted in a regiment being formed in Brockville. In September 1812 he took part in the raid by British and Canadian forces on Ogdensburg. He remained in the militia and in 1845 was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. (Recorder and Times, Darling Scrapbook No.5)

 

By the 1840’s Unionville was a thriving entrepot at the junction of the Macadamized Road to Smith’s Falls and the Plank Road to Farmersville. A private company, the Farmersville Plank Road Company, was chartered with a capital of £1600 divided into 320 shares at £5 each, “to make a plank road from Unionville to Farmersville, build toll gates and bridges, secure the necessary stones and make all the grading required for the road”.

victoria-rd-br-may-10-1849-sfb5

Victoria Macadamized Road- May 17, 1849

An advertisement appears calling for tenders for the completion of the several sections of the Victoria macadamized road leading from the residence of John Taylor, in the fourth concession of Elizabethtown, to Unionville. The tenders were to state the lowest terms for which the whole or any part of the road would be planked or macadamized. Tenders were referred for particulars to Thomas Hume, district surveyor.

 

When the post office opened in 1831, postmaster E. H. Whitmarsh changed the community’s name from Stone’s Corner to Unionville. Two years later the post office was suspended, but the place kept the name, last appearing on a map in 1861.

 

 

Unionville Fairunion-fairgrounds-forthton-pab-7-f10-10

As the village of Unionville grew, the Elizabethtown Agricultural Society held its annual fair in a vacant field opposite the Forth Hotel. Permanent buildings were constructed, including barns, exhibit halls and bleachers. The Unionville Racetrack was located along Highway No. 42 north of Forthton.

 

 

 

bkv-fair-tbt-feb-22-1905

Brockville Fair Feb 22, 1905

Directors Meet to Organize- a Four Day’s Exhibition This Year.

At a meeting of the new Board of |Directors of the Brockville Fair, held yesterday afternoon, R.H. Field was re-elected secretary and Ed. Davis treasurer. The following committees were appointed:

Sports- W.H.Comstock, F.I Rtchie, N.H.Beecher, D.Forth.

Printing and advertising- R.H.Field, R.J.Jelly, G.A.Wright

Messrs Beecher and Field were delegated to represent the association at the meeting of representatives of fairs of Eastern Ontario in Ottawa on March 8th.

The four-day exhibition proved such a great success last year that it was decided to repeat the performance in 1905, beginning with either Monday Sept. 11th or Tuesday Sept. 12th which will be definitely settled later.

The Board will meet again on March 10th for the purpose of revising the prize list.

Forthton is located north of Brockville on Highway 29 at the intersection of Hwy 42

(selected excerpts from Elizabethtown: The Last of the Royal Townships, by Alvyn Austin pub 2009)

 

 

forthton-stn-sb2p3r
Old B&W Railroad station at Forthton
old-forth-residencs-at-forthton-taken-in-1978-2
Old Forth Residence c1978
forthton-former-inn-photo-alvyn-austin
Former Inn and Hotel at Forthton
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Forthton 4-H Homemaking Club c1954
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Road sign on 29 Highway
1-forthton
1998 Map of Forthton

 

“Edna’s Scrapbook”

is a paperback book written by Edna B. Chant and was published in 1998. Edna Chant was a reported with the “Athens Reporter” for 23 years and she is the author of four books.

Her book, which is made up of news clippings from various sources, from which we have taken excerpts, gives us a glimpse into life in our area for over a hundred year period ending with stories from 1975.

While her book covers many areas of Leeds and Grenville we have only focused on the area within Elizabethtown-Kitley Township.

Forthton

The first post office at Unionville was opened on April 16th, 1841

At the Unionville Fair in August 1898, a special attraction was a race horse “Geraldine”, the Guideless Wonder”. The horse will race any horse, running without a rider and has never been beaten.

An amusing incident occurred at the Unionville Fair in 190. A woman borrowed a loaf of homemade bread fro a neighbour as she was expecting visitors. It looked so nice she entered in the fair and she got first prize.

Mowat Jackson 33 of Plum Hollow was killed on Oct 23, 1940 at Forthton.

Two men lost their lives in a motor accident at Forthton on No.29 Highway. Harry Countryman died instantly on October 30, 1941. His passenger William J. Hewitt died of injuries the next day.

A young resident of Forthton, Ronald Chant,21, was drowned in Lyn quarry on August 7, 1967. He had been swimming with other friends across the quarry when he seemed to tire suddenly and called for help. When friends reached him he disappeared. It took firemen and police almost an hour to recover the body. He was the only son of Mrs. Hazel Chant and the late Cecil Chant. He was employed at the Johnston Shoe Company in Brockville.

Fire destroyed a large dairy barn on the farm of Earl Seabrooke at Forthton on April 9, 1969. Mr. Seabrooke had just let his cows out to water, but the young cattle were in the barn. He was able to get 13 calves and a horse out safely but one calf, milking equipment and all other contents were lost. It is believed a short circuit in the wiring caused the fire.

The Athens Reporter and County of Leeds Advertiser

Excerpts have been taken from this paper referencing the following hamlet for the years 1889, 1894 and 1895

Tuesday Dec. 4, 1894 issue-

Forthton– Friday Nov 30-

Mrs. Giles of Montreal was the guest of Mrs. D.J.Forth last week.

Miss. Ella Hall and Mr. John M. Percival spent last week in Brockville.

Mr. John Forth is recovering from a severe attack of pleurisy.

The trustees of our school have engaged Miss. Anna Scot as a teacher for the coming year.

The social given by Epworth League on Friday evening was a grand success. The programme consisted of readings by Misses Hall and Clow which showed great vocal talent, solos by Misses Towris and Orton were exceptionally well rendered, and recitations by Hamilton, Lyn, and Chas. Howe, show that in the near future Glen Buell may produce some great orators. The chair was ably filed by Rev. J. Perley who gave a very appropriate address. Rev. W. Coates closed by a very interesting address on League work. The refreshments were such as “Delmonico’s”. By the way the cake vanished into a vacancy in a high corner of the house, one could conclude that they had a heart for the missing link of the chain band. Bob, did you get any !

Tuesday Aug 20, 1895 issue

Obituary

Dies at his residence near Unionville, on Sunday evening last, Charles Knapp, aged 61 years. Mr. Knapp was born in Plum Hollow and has always resided in this locality. He was a brother of Ithamer Knapp, postmaster, Plum Hollow

Stewart’s – A One Room School House in Elizabethtown

Stewart’s School

(School Section #1 – Elizabethtown)

(School Section #16 – Augusta)

 

Adiel Sherwood inherited Lots 1 & 2 on the death of his father in 1826, and four years later sold Lot 1 to Henry Bradfield, a stone mason. Bradfield who lived here for 50 years also donated land for a school in 1860 (S.S.#1) on the Highway. [1]

 

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Stewart’s School, photo taken in 1955
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Stewart’s School photo from 1955, unfortunately the people are unknown

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If anyone has any additional information or photos on this school, we would appreciate hearing from you.

 

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Stone building, 20×26 in size, constructed in 1844, condition: Good

1854: Stone building first opened in 1860

 

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

That the request of the trustees of Union School section No 1 in Elizabethtown and No 1 in the Twp of Augusta be completed and the sum of 90 pounds be levied and collected on that property 1862
that the trustees of School Section No. 1 be paid the sum of $0.67 cts as School tax on 12 acres of land on part Lots 7&8 in the 1st concession of Elizabethtown assessed to William Holms and the clerk order the same to be paid 1870
that the application of the trustees of School Section No 1 be complied with and the sum of $100 be levied and collected on the assessed taxable property of School Section No 1 of the Township of Elizabethtown for school purposes free from all expenses for the year 1870
that the application of the Trustees of School section No 1 be complied with and the sum of $150 be levied and collected on the rateable property of said section exclusive of expenses 1871
that the Trustees of School Section No 1 be paid the sum of $52.82 as balance of the amount levied and collected in said Section for school purposes and the clerk give an order for the same- 1872
that the application of trustees of school section No 1 Elizabethtown be complied with and the sum of $150 be levied and collected and the rateable property of said section for school purposes exclusive of expenses- 1872
that the Trustees of School No 1 be paid the sum of $150 dollars being the amount levied on said section for School purposes and the Clerk order the sae to be paid to Alexander Miller- 1873
that $36 dollars of Clergy money be divided amongst the School Sections of this Township in the following manner, namely Sections No 1 $10, No 12 $5, No 26 $9, No 27 $9.31 cents, No 28 $5, No 29 $2, No 30 $5, No 31 $6 bring union section all the full Sections will leave the sum of $13.11 cents each and the Clerk ? the sum to be paid to the Trustees of each School Section- 1873
that the Trustees of School Section No 1 be paid the sum of $150 dollars being payment of the amount collected on said section for school purposes and the Clerk order the same to be paid to the Trustees[2] – 1873

[1] The History of Elizabethtown by Alvyn Austin 2002

[2] Lyn Museum Archives

Row’s Corners – A One Room School House in Elizabethtown

Row’s Corners

rowes-corners-school-1861-62-map
Location of Rowe’s Corners School – Map 1861-62

(School Section # 4)

 

This is all the information we have on this school. If anyone as any additional information or photos on this school we would appreciate hearing from you.

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Frame building, constructed in 1832, condition: Good

1854: Stone building first opened in 1846

 

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

That the sum of $73. clear of all expenses be levied and collected on the rateable property of school section No 4.-1862
that the application of the trustees of School Section No 4 be received and laid over for further consideration- 1868
that the Trustees of School Section No 4 of Elizabethtown be paid to Samuel McNish agreeable to the request of the Trustees of said Section- 1871
To the Municipal Council of the Township of Elizabethtown in Council assembled, Gentlemen, Please pay Samuel McNish the sum due School Section No 4 of Elizabethtown, signed Sidney Easton and Cyrus Wright- 1871
that James Daniels and John Daniels be relieved from paying School Tax to School Section No 4 amounting to $6.66 cents as said Daniels belong to the Separate School in Brockville and the collector get a copy of this motion- 1872[1]

[1] Lyn Museum Archives

Rock Springs – A One Room School House in Elizabethtown

Rock Springs School

(School Section #25 – Elizabethtown)

(School Section # 19 – Kitley)

rock-springs-school-1861-62-map
Location of school on a map from 1861-62

 

This is all the information we have on this school If anyone has inforation or photos we would appreciate hearing from you.

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: no report

1854: no report

 

Read’s School – A One Room School House in Elizabethtown

Read’s School

(School Section 2- Elizabethtown)

(School Section 30 – Augusta)

 

Read’s Public School, a log structure, was built in 1831 and served the community of Bethel for nearly 50 years until a stone building was erected in 1880 on the same plot of land. The land had originally been donated by UEL Pioneer Guy Carleton Read (1785-1849), The Read family gave their name to the school and the nearby Read’s cemetery which dates back to 1800.

The original log school was also used by Methodist circuit riders for church services.

Among the early teachers were Jehiel Collins, in the early 1800’s; William Garvey around 1820; John Walker 1854; Tom Henderson 1855; Catherine Wright 1858 and many others. The school was located in Bethel.

(Recorder and Times, Darling Scrapbook Collection Book 3 pgs 17-29)

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Frame building, 28×30 in size, constructed in 1810, condition: Good

1854: Stone building first opened in 1853

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

that the request of the Trustees of School Section No 2 be complied with and that the sum of $160.00 clear of all expenses be levied and collected on the assessed rateable property of said school section for school purposes for the current year 1867
That the request of the trustees of School Section No 2 be complied with that the sum of two hundred dollars be levied and collected on the rateable property of said section exclusive of expenses- 1869
that the Clerk order the treasurer to pay the Trustees of School Section No 2 or their order the sum of $160 as part payment of the amount due said section- 1870
that the application of the Trustees of School section No 2 be complied with and the sum of Two hundred and forty dollars be levied and collected on the taxable property of said section exclusive of expenses-1871
that the application of School Trustees Section No 2 be complied with and the sum of $240 be levied and collected on the Taxable property of said section exclusive of expenses 1872[1]

[1] Lyn Museum Archives

reads-sch-100th-anniv-in-1981-darling-bk3
100th Anniversary 1981
reads-public-1921
Read’s School Class of 1921
reads-school-c1900-darling-bk3-1
Read’s School Class c1900

“Edna’s Scrapbook”

is a paperback book written by Edna B. Chant and was published in 1998. Edna Chant was a reported with the “Athens Reporter” for 23 years and she is the author of four books.

Her book, which is made up of news clippings from various sources, from which we have taken excerpts, gives us a glimpse into life in our area for over a hundred year period ending with stories from 1975.

While her book covers many areas of Leeds and Grenville we have only focused on the area within Elizabethtown-Kitley Township.

Read’s School

One of the oldest schools in the area is Read’s Stone schoolhouse which has been preserved in good repair. The very first school in the district was built in 1830 of logs. In 1880 it was replaced by the stone school and it served the district for 82 years, being closed in 1962. The school as well as the pioneer cemetery nearby was named after the Read Family. Guy Landon Read once owned an inn here. After the school was closed, it was purchased by Miss. Athalie H.M.Read who attended school here from 1923 to 1930. Guy Carleton Read once owned the land on which the school stands. Reads is located on the third concession of Augusta Township. The first teacher in the old log school was Johiel H.Collins. The first teacher in the stone school was Isabella Ross. The last teacher was Mrs. Horton Tanney.

 

Read’s School- May, 2017 photo by Hans-Ulrich Raffelt

 

 

 

 

Moore’s – A One Room School House in Elizabethtown

Moore’s School

(School Section #21)

 

 

We have no additional information about this school. If anyone has any information or photos, we would appreciate hearing from you.

 

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Log building, 20×26 in size, constructed in 1850, condition: Good

1854: Stone building first opened in 1832

 

 

Mead’s – A One Room School House in Elizabethtown

Mead’s

Sectional School No. 14

We have very little information on this school. If anyone has any information or photos we would appreciate hearing from you.

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Frame Building, construction date 1826, condition: Good

1854: Stone building, first opened in 1820

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

that the sum of three dollars and fifty cents be paid to trustees of School Section No 14 of Elizabethtown as uncollectable and the clerk order the same to be paid Benjamin Frances 1873[1]

[1] Lyn Museum Archives

Maud’s – A One Room School House in Eizabethtown

Maud’s School

(School Section No. 18)

 

We have very little information on this school. If anyone has any information or photos we would appreciate hearing from you.

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Stone Building, size 28×38, construction date 1830, condition: Good

1854: Log building, first opened in 1819

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

That Edward Davis be detached from school section no 18 and be attached to school section no 20-1858
That the request of the trustees of School Section No 18 be accepted and that the sum of $60. be levied and collected on the rateable property of said section for school purposes-1862
that the petition of the trustees of School Section No 18 be complied with and the sum of Thirty dollars be levied and collected on the assessed rateable property of said section free of all expenses for school purposes and paid to the trustees of said section- 1867
That the request of the trustees of School Section No 18 be complied with that the sum of sixty five dollars be levied and collected on the rateable property of said section exclusive of expenses-1869
that the application of the Trustees of School section No 18 be complied with and the sum of Eighty dollars be levied and collected on the rateable property of said section exclusive of expenses-1871
that the application of School Trustees Section No 18 be complied with and the sum of $100 dollars be levied and collected on the Taxable property of said section exclusive of expenses-1872[1]

[1] Lyn Museum Archives

Manhard’s – A One Room School House in Elizabethtown

Manhards School

(School Section # 13)

manhard-school-1861-62-map
Location of school on a map from 1861-62

We have no information on this school. If anyone has any informaion or photos we would appreciate hearing from you.

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Stone Building, size 18×24, construction date 1847, condition: Good

1854: Stone building, first opened in 1844

 

Jellby – A One Room School House in Eizabethtown

Jellby School

(School Section # 22)

jellby-school-1861-62-map
Location of Jellby School – Map of 1861-62

 

We have no information about this school, if anyone has any information or photos we would appreciate hearing from you.

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: No Report

1854: Stone building, first opened in 1826

 

Kitley – The Early Years

Kitley –  The Early Years

elizabethtown-kitley-master-1800-map-1-copy
Kitley Township

When the United Empire Loyalists travelled up the St. Lawrence River in their bateaux, Durham Boats and canoes, in 1784 to claim their new homesteads, Kitley Township was still a wilderness, inhabited only occasionally by nomadic Indian tribes on hunting and fishing expeditions.

While UEL pioneers were settling along the riverfront townships, the future township of Kitley was undeveloped and uninhabited.

Edwardsburgh, Augusta and Elizabethtown were first settled, but north of these new townships, dense forests stretched to the Rideau River and beyond.

The land had formerly been Indian Territory, though the natives used it only for occasional hunting and fishing expeditions. They had no permanent settlements such as those which once existed in Augusta Township. The Iroquois had a number of trails running through the wild forest which covered the area, the paths starting at the St. Lawrence and winding up in the Rideau District.

French Canadian fur traders also criss-crossed the area but left no permanent camps to mark their passage.

gov-haidimand
Gov. Frederick Haidimand

In 1790, Governor Frederick Haidimand, a British army general, ordered surveys of the lands north of the settled townships.

Survey parties under Lt. Gersham French and Capt. James Sherwood of Jessop’s Rangers, examined the area which was to become Kitley and found it suitable for habitation and settlement. They were impressed by the numerous mill sites found along inland streams.

The actual survey of Kitley was delayed for seven years until 1797. In the meantime, Kitley had its first settler, a pioneer farmer named James Finch. With his family, James Finch settled on what was later to become Lot No. 29 in the 7th Concession.

The Pioneer Upper Canada Surveyor, Lewis Grant, laid out the lines of Kitley Township in 1797. It consisted of approximately 100 square miles of dense forest. For some reason, probably because its northern end was closer to the Rideau Canal than to the St. Lawrence, for shipping purposes, the concessions ran from north to south rather than from south to north as in Elizabethtown and Augusta Townships.

But Grant and his helpers laid out the township from the south starting with Concession 10. When they reached the Northern end they discovered that Concession 1 was only half as wide as the other nine. That’s why Concession One is narrower than the others and has fewer lots.

Marking off the Lots, the surveyors started at no. 30 in the west and worked their way eastward, then discovered another major error; they actually ran out of room! As a result, this mistake by the surveyors robbed Kitley of the first three lots in every concession. Starting in the west with Lot No. 30, Lot No. 4 is the most easterly. Lots numbers 1, 2 and 3 do not exist!

Later surveys show No. 22 to be a reserve lot. James Finch who had already cleared five acres on Lot No.22 moved over to Lot No. 21. (Possibly before anything was officially signed.)

Both lots lie along the road which became the main street of Toledo. Although Mr. Finch erected a log cabin, dug a well, and cleared 16 acres on Lot No. 21, his claim to the land was disputed by the government.

The Kitley census of 1800 lists James Finch as a settler, but he is missing from the count in 1804. Historians believe that he got fed up with government delays in approving his claim and left the area in disgust.

Irishmen formed the backbone of old Kitley Township 150 years ago, and this tiny farming community boasted a fair sampling of sons of Erin (Ireland) along with UEL folk, some of whom came from the deep south of the United States.

In the 1820’s, Irish, English and Scottish settlers flooded into Kitley, helped by free passage over the Atlantic, guaranteed by the government and an offer of 100 acres of free land per family.

After the great Irish migration of the 1830’s and 1840’s to Canada, when the Irish fled their homeland to escape the ravages of droughts and famine, Kitley folk numbered 3,565 souls. There were 962 citizens from Ireland or of Irish extraction as well as 67 Scots, 61 Englishmen, 93 Yankees, 24 Quebecois, 15 Maritimer’s, one German and one East Indian. As well, over 2,000 of these residents were native Indians who still hunted in the hills and valleys and along the lakes and creeks.

Kitley Township was named after Kitley, Devonshire, England, home of a British M.P. John Bastard and the township of Bastard was named after the M.P. himself.

Abel Stevens, the Baptist elder who colonized Bastard and parts of Kitley, listed 39 families in Kitley in 1798.He didn’t mention James Finch but listed two sons, Richard and Henry Finch.

Toldeo researchers found that James Finch had been granted 200 acres on Lot No. 22 on May 22, 1801, but Finch sold the property the next year to Hugh McIlmoyl, who then sold to Eben Estes the same year. After several more transactions the lot came into possession of Wyatt Chamberlain, the founder of the village.

Wyatt Chamberland, a retired preacher, called this settlement Camberlain’s Corners. He opened the first store in a log cabin. Rev. Chamberland also built the first frame dwelling in the area, was the first postmaster and became a justice of the peace. His first wife was Catherine Halleck, daughter of pioneer missionary Rev. William Halleck, for whom Halleck’s Road, west of Brockville was named.

Chamberland’s Corners officially became Toledo in 1856. The village was named after Toledo in Spain, scene of a British victory over a French army in the Spanish Campaign of 1813.

In 1851, Kitley boasted 3,525 souls, men outnumbering women by only 25. There were 962 residents Irish or of Irish extraction and only 24 French speaking citizens. 91 were from the United States and 128 from England, Scotland and Wales.

The township listed 540 families living in 529 homes. The dwellings were said to consist of 32 in stone, 81 frame, 300 log cabin style and 110 shanties.

The Township of Kitley, in Leeds and Grenville County, Ontario, was incorporated effective January 1, 1850 under the terms of the Baldwin Act, Chapter 81, Canada Statutes, 1849.

James Graham was elected the first Reeve. Hiram McCrea took over the reeve ship in 1861. He lost to William Bell in 1862-63 but regained the position in 1864-66.

Kitley has grown and waned over the years and remains today a busy township, with a number of enterprising communities contributing to the well-being of Eastern Ontario.

(Recorder and Times c1985, Darling Collection Book 5)

 

Absentee Land Owners Plagues Early Kitley

Absentee land-lords were the plague of Kitley’s early days and were in a large measure responsible for the delayed development on the township.

Hon. William D. Powell chief justice of Upper Canada, already a wealthy man, became even richer with the grant of 1,200 acres in Kitley in 1797. He never saw an acre but simply held on to the land until the time was ripe for an enormous profit. Then he sold his 1,200 acres in parcels. He also got 1,200 acres for his wife, and sold those lots as well.

Another man who never saw his land was Major Hazelton Spencer, who lived in Niagara but was granted 1,200 acres of Kitley land. He sold at a good profit without ever visiting the site.

There were many large grants of land which eventually were sold to give the owners a good profit.

(Recorder and Times c1985, Darling Collection Book 5)

 

The First Mill

Joseph Haskins, the first miller in these parts, settled on the future site of Jasper in 1802. At that time, Irish Lake was a muddy swamp or marsh, drained by Irish Creek which turned into the Rideau River, north of Haskins’ Mill.

Mr. Haskins dammed the creek near his homestead then used the dam water to run a grist mill he erected. A sawmill followed and pretty soon a hamlet grew up around the homestead.

Damming of the creek backed up water to form a lake where the marsh land had existed. The name Irish Lake was given to this body of water.

Haskins’ Dam created such a body of water that when Col. John By’s surveyors were laying out the route of the proposed Rideau Canal in 1825, they seriously considered running the new waterway down Irish Creek, through Irish Lake and thence westward to Bellamy’s Mills, now Toledo. However the prospect of having to cut through high ground west from Toledo, deterred the surveyors and further tests on Irish Lake indicated some six feet of mud would have to be excavated over the entire length of the lake to make a channel feasible.

The Irish Creek – Irish Lake idea was abandoned and the surveyors laid out the canal route past the estuary of Irish Creek on to Smith’s Falls, eventually cresting the height of land at Newboro and then going downhill along the Cataraqui River to Kingston.

First called Irish Creek, the village became Jasper when postal service was inaugurated in the late 1830’s.

The Livingston’s were also millers and among the first to provide their neighbours with milled flour. Later the Bellamy Brothers put up grist mills and sawmills on Bellamy Pond. (Recorder and Times c1985, Darling Collection Book 5)

 

Early Religion

The ‘old time’ Methodist circuit riders brought religion to Kitley’s pioneers by horseback. In 1818 the good folks of Kitley organized their first Methodist congregation.

Up until that point, these circuit riders had been holding Sunday services in various homesteads. Records show that Reverend Ezra Healey conducted worship in 1818 at the home of Alex McClure.

Four families formed the first Methodist Society. They were the families of Duncan Livingston, Jonathon Lyman, Horace Tupper and Ephraim Koyl.

Kitley’s first Methodist Church was erected in 1839 in Toledo by Alex McLean and George Marshall, the builders.

The Presbyterian congregation was organized in 1843 and a church was built shortly thereafter.

In 1830, the Roman Catholics built a church at Belamy Mills. (Kitley).  Irish settlers contributed their labour in the construction and formed the largest segment of the parish. (Recorder and Times c1985, Darling Collection Book 5)

 

Cheese Factories

When there was a surplus of milk in the early days, it was used for making butter. The surplus butter was packed in wooden tubs or boxes and taken to market in the autumn or early winter.

About a century ago, in response to a demand in the British market, there was a shift from butter making to cheese making.

To make Cheddar Cheese it was necessary to have a factory, with considerable equipment, to which the farmer could deliver milk daily. The first item of equipment was a steam boiler to provide heat to the vat in which the cheese making took place. Therefore the factory had to be located where there was a reliable source of water.

There have been ten factories in Kitley or on its boundaries, although they were not all in operation at the same time.

The Ross Factory was later removed to Newbliss and McAndrew’s Factory was located at the intersection of the Bastard Town Line and the Fourth Concession before Donovan’s was established. Bellamy’s Cheese Factory was  first located under the hill, and later beside the pond. Cameron’s Factory was located at Shane’s and Moore’s was near Eloida and Frankville, Crystal and Jasper.

When Robert T. Beckett came to Kitley in the late 1890’s, he helped to organize what was known as Donovan’s Factory. About 1900 he left Johnnie Donovan in charge there and came to Newbliss. He was a man who tried to lead the way to brighter things.

The Newbliss Factory consisted of three frame buildings. The factory proper is still in use as a store. The curing room has been moved across the road and made into a garage and dwelling. Directly behind the main building was the boiler room.

The weighing-in stand was under a canopy facing the highway. The cans of milk were raised by a hand operated hoist, which was later replaced by one run by steam power. The milk cans were of the thirty gallon size, which held up to three hundred pounds, or the forty gallon size which had a capacity of four hundred pounds.

From the scales, the milk passed through a conductor pipe and a strainer, made from several piles of cotton, into a vat. When the vat was filled to a certain level and heated to a prescribed temperature, rennet was added, and also colouring, in the case of coloured cheese. The additives were thoroughly mixed with the milk and then the vat was covered and allowed to set.

In due time the curd was cut and the whey drained off. Next, the curd was washed, salted and placed in the press. Enough curd was put into the press to yield a cheese weighing between ninety and one hundred pounds after the air and moisture had been squeezed out. The cylindrical block of cheese had a skin made of cotton gauze known as a cheese cloth.

The blocks of cheese were placed on tables in the curing room, where they were kept at a constant temperature for a period of some weeks. When ready for shipment they were placed in cylindrical wooden containers, known as cheese boxes. Protected by a thin coat of paraffin wax, the cheese could withstand the moderate changes of temperature but would be damaged by freezing.

Usually the factory patrons took turns hauling the cheese to the railway station, from where it was shipped to the Brockville Cheese Board.

When Wilfred Bruce was running the factory he lacked only a few cents of having a thousand dollars for making cheese in the month of June. He was being paid about four cents a pound, so he must have produced about 25,000 pounds of cheese. (Recorder and Times article dated March 15, 1967) (Recorder and Times c1985, Darling Collection Book 5)

 

Excerpts from “Leeds Grenville: their first two hundred years” by Ruth McKenzie pub. 1967

We come to Kitley bounded by Wolford on the east and South Elmsley on the north. Kitley is an inland township watered by tributaries of the Rideau (Irish Creek and Hutton Creek), but not extending as far north as the main Rideau River.

Most of the early settlers in Kitley drew their land on the seventh, eighth or ninth concession, the three lines nearest to Elizabethtown to the south. Some of these early settlers were Baptists who came to Canada with Able Stevens, founder of Bastard Township. Among the names of the pioneers who arrived before 1800 were Read, Livingston and Soper.

The first of the Read family (also spelled Reed) was Major William Read, a Loyalist who settled in New Brunswick after the American Revolution and then came up the St. Lawrence to Upper Canada towards the end of the century. He drew 400 acres of land in Kitley, a 200 acre lot on the eighth concession, where he lived and another on the seventh. Major Reed became a leader in the community and, in the years preceding the War of 1812, he trained a band of some sixty volunteers for the war he feared was coming. Among the volunteers were his three sons, one of whom, William Junior, became a Captain in the War of 1812.

When Major Read died in 1828 at 79 years of age, he was buried on his farm in what is now an abandoned cemetery “small, dilapidated and overgrown with prickly ash”, as it was described recently.

 

Providence Chapel

Providence Chapel at Crystal

Methodists worshipped anywhere they could find shelter, a barn being used on more than one occasion but in 1834, the congregation built a log chapel on the eastern edge of Kitley Township in the community known as Crystal and the church subsequently bore the name “Providence Chapel”.

The church was used until church union in 1935 when it was sold to a local resident who in turn donated it in 1960 to Upper Canada Village.

In October 2016, Upper Canada Village allowed us access to the chapel for photographs. They told us that the only original feature on the inside of the building is the pulpit and railing. The pews were added but reflected the pews in use at the time.

 

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Front Door of the Providence Chapel (2016)
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Side View Providence Chapel at Upper Canada Village, October 2016
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Rear view of Providence Chapel
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Providence Chapel October 2016
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Side View of the Providence Chapel October 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Inside the Providence Chapel
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Looking to the front of the Chapel and the original pulpit
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The original pulpit
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Looking from the pulpit to the back of the chapel
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Interior of the Providence Chapel at Upper Canada Village October 2016

 

Montgomery House

The Montgomery Log House

The Montgomery House was moved to a site on Highway 29 just north of the main Frankville intersection where it remained for many years. A popular misconception was that this was the original home of Louise Crummy McKinney,  her home still exists on the Lake Eloida Road.

The Montgomery Cabin was originally on the 188 Line 8 Frankville property originally owned by Joseph Montgomery. Joseph and his wife are buried on this property in the late 1800’s.

The log house was moved to Upper Canada Village where it has been refurbished on the inside into a very comfortable and modern cabin. It is used to house students who spend time at the village during the summer months, it can also be rented out to families who want to spend extra time experiencing life at Upper Canada Village.

We appreciate Upper Canada Village allowing us access to the building and allowing us the opportunity of sharing these photos.

 

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The log house when it was in Frankville c1985
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The log house in Frankville c1985

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Upper Canada Village October 2016
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Upper Canada Village October 2016
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Washrooms and showers have been added in the addition to the right

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Downstairs interior kitchen area October 2016
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Downstairs area October 2016
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Downstairs Area October 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Upstairs Sleeping area October 2016
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Upstairs sleeping area 2016
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Upstairs sleeping area 2016

The log Cabin originally stool on the Montgomery property on Kitley Line 8

Map of 1861-62

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Montgomery’s are buried in a private grave on their original farm.

Joseph Montgomery Sr Dec 23 1883 @ 93yrs

 

Margaret Montgomery Mar 20 1869 @ 82yrs

 

Obituary for William Henry Montgomery, son of Joseph Montgomery

Frankville- Feb 26, 1925

Kitley Mourns the Loss of William Henry Montgomery. Was a  School Teacher after leaving Athens High School

The death occurred at Frankville, on Tuesday, February 24, of a highly respected and widely known citizen in the person of William Henry Montgomery. The deceased had been strickened with paralysis only a few days before and had failed to show any improvement during the time up to his death. On Tuesday morning about 3:30 the end came. The whole community and surrounding country were in mourning. The one who had passed way was the great helper and advisor of the community. He was a man slow to criticize, of weighty judgment and of a charitable nature and the district has lost one of its greatest intellects. The deceased was much interested in public and political life. Being a staunch Conservative, he took and active part in politics.

The latter part of Mr. Montgomery’s life was spent at Frankville, where he was born in 1856, the son of the late Joseph Montgomery. He attended the Farmersville (Athens) High School and after graduating from that institution taught school in several parts of the district. Then he accepted a position as Customs Officer at Brockville, and spent some years in the service of the government. He returned to the home of his boyhood to spend the remainder of his life in the service of the people with whom he began his days.

The funeral left the home at 1 p.m. on Thursday and the service was conducted by the Rev. T.F. Townshend of the Toledo Union Church and internment made in the cemetery there.

Some years ago the only daughter, Mrs. W.J. Plunkett, Perth, Ont., passed away. A sorrowing wife, one grandson, E. Cleon Plunkett, and family, Ottawa; four brothers, J.W. Montgomery, Frankville; Stewart Montgomery, Frankville; Rev. Edgar Montgomery, Tauton, Mass; Herman Montgomery, Almonte and one sister, Mrs. H. Pierce, Smiths Falls remain to morn the great loss.

The pallbearers were the cousins of the deceased, Manford Montgomery. James Robb, George Robb, Edgar Robb, I.E. Lockwood and Morty E. Montgomery.

Among the floral offerings were sprays from Mr. and Mrs. H.A. Stewart, Brockville; Dr. W.H. Bourns and Mrs. Edgers, Frankville; and Dr. H.A. Clark, MPP, Brockville.

Much sympathy is extended to the bereaved wife and sorrowing friends.

 

Confusion about the connection between Louise Crummy and the Montgomery Cabin

 

The Plaque Reads as Follows: Louise C. McKinney (1868-1931) Born on a nearby farm Louise Crummy taught school in Leeds County and in 19896 married James McKinney. In 1903 they settled in Claresholm Alberta. A leader in the temperance movement and strong advocate of female suffrage she was elected as an Independent member of the Alberta legislature in 1907. She thus became the first woman in the British Empire to gain a parliamentary seat.

 

In 1967 a plaque was erected in front of the Montgomery House to honour Louise Crummy McKinney, who was born in the Frankville area. Unfortunately the placement of this plaque in front of the Mongtomery Cabin, led many to believe that this cabin was the birthplace of Louise Crummy.

This cabin was not her birthplace.

 

 

 

 

Sherwood Cemetery

Sherwood Cemetery

Concession 1, Lot 1 Location: behine 1937 Hwy 2, on the eastern boundary of Elizabethtown, on Burnside Road Alternate Cemetery Name: Old Thomas Sherwood Family Cemetery – Twp of Elizabethtown* GPS- 44.614576, -75.643404

 

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Photo Fall of 2013
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Photo Fall of 2013
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Photo Fall of 2013
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Photo Fall of 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

List of Graves

Martha wife of James Sherwood

Nov. 29, 1865 – aged 75 yrs.

James Sherwood

Not legible

Jane M wife of Thos. Sherwood

Oct. 7, 1805 – Nov. 12, 1894

Thos. Sherwood

Aug. 9, 1813 – Mar. 27, 1895

Sherwood – not legible

Elizabeth G. Dire wife of Henry J. Arnold

May 29, 1852 age 23

 

Horton Cemetery

Horton Cemetery

6539 New Dublin Rd, cor 7th Concession, in field On Private Land, Cemetery Status: Closed to further burials – Twp of Elizabethtown*  GPS- 44.667882, -75.795032

 

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Frederick Moore 1770-1848

 

Frederick Moore Sr. 1770-1848

Eliza Bolton 1773-1815

NCO Irish Yoeman Calvary

Q.M. Sgt. War 1812

Ensign 1st Leeds Militia

 

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William Moore 1740-1820

 

 

William Moore 1740-1820

Married in Dublin c1766

Frances Proctor c1714-c1816

Member Barbers-Surgeons Guild

Yeoman Loyalist Co. Wexford 1798

Arrived Aug 1817 Younge Twp

 

 

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Photo Fall of 2013
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Photo Fall of 2013
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Photo Fall of 2013
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Photo Fall of 2013
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Photo Fall of 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Horton Cemetery

List of internment’s

  1. Sarah Moore who died Jan 20, 1816 in the 18th year of her age (footstone, small marker)
  2. Foot Stone (E.M.)
  3. Frederick Moore, Sr. who died Sep 4, 1848 in the ?? year, b.1770
  4. George Thompson, Born in Co. Tyrone Ireland, died in Elizabethtown, Oct 2, 1840 at 84 yrs
  5. George Evans, who died August 1856, age 21 yrs & 8 mos
  6. Ellen Maud, wife of James Astleford, who died Mar 28 1874 aged 36 yrs, 3 mo, 24 days
  7. Hannah Cockral, wife of Henry Maud who died Aug 30, 1857 aged 60 yrs
  8. Susan, wife of Henry Maud, who died Mar 23, 1874 aged 72 yrs, also her Grand-daughter Margaret Akice. (Erected by her daughter Sarah Astleford)
  9. Adam Horton, d Aug 29, 1861, Ann wife of Adam Horton d Aug. 7 1856 aged 70 years (Stone Broken)
  10. Willm. Davis d July 15, 1868 age 80 years
  11. Jane daughter of Willm & E.Davis died Oct 10, 1855 age 27 yrs
  12. Caroline A., dau’r of John & Caroline A. Shannon died Aug. 11, 1870 aged 4 yrs, 3 mos & 6 days
  13. Rev. James Samuel Evans, died July 24, 1910 aged 78 yrs, 7 mos, 1 day
  14. John Evans, died Juy 29, 1885 aged 85 years 28 d’s also his wife Mary Ann Thompson died Feb 18, 1890 aged 90 yrs. Natives of Drummond, Tyrone Co., Ireland
  15. Delorma, son of George and Lucinda Evans died Nov 11, 18??, age 2 yrs
  16. William James, son of W.J. & C.Cooper, died June 11, 1897 age 33 yrs, 3mos
  17. William Baker, 1845-1913
  18. John Horton died Aug 18, 1905 aged 93 yrs, 7 mos.
  19. Ann Maud wife of John Horton died March 1, 1894 aged 69 years & 10 months
  20. James Astleford, born Aug 19, 1838 died Aug 129, 1892, his wife Ann Horton born Feb 27, 1851 died Jan 8 1935
  21. Jane Astleford, wife of Henry Maud, died Sep 17, 1905, aged 68 yrs, Henry Maud born April 15, 1840, died March 8, 1913

 

 

Scott’s Farm Cemetery (Campbell Cemetery)

Scott’s Cemetery – Campbell Cemetery

Concession 10, Lot 4, Cty Rd 7 to Atkins Lake Rd before the county line (Alternate names: Mrs. Scott’sFarm, Scott’s Farm Cemetery)

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Photo Fall 2013
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Photo Fall 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

List of Graves: 

Inserted “?” if not legible

 

JELLY, William John

Died May 16, 1909 age 46 yrs. 4 mos.

 

 

CAMPBELL, George

Died 1890 age 72 yrs

CAMPBELL, Jane

Died May 23, 1897 age 52

Maria, wife of George

Died June 14, 1890 age 7?

 

 

CAMPBELL, George A, sone of George & Maria

Feb. 9, 1855 – July 2, 1928

Maria Melissa, wife of W.J. Jelly

1859 – 1951

 

 

 

 

Week’s Cemetery

Week’s Cemetery

Concession: 2, Lot: 25/26; Location: next to 2418 Murphy Road; Cemetery Status: Closed to further burials  – Unregistered Cemetery- on Private Property–  GPS- 44-583896, -75.760260

 

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Photo 2012
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Photo 2012

 

WEEKS, Neoma (wife of John Weeks) – died 1851 at age 70 yrs

 

 

Sanford / Loverin Burying Ground

Sanford / Loverin Burying Ground

Concession 9, Lot 26-27), Location: West of Greenbush, 9330 Addison Greenbush Rd, north side- Twp of Elizabethtown* GPS not available

 

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David Morton Sanford d Jun 12, 1912 age 53 years (R) Wealtha Hurlbert, wife of David Morton d Jun 21 1893 age 34y,8mo,6days (L)
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Photo taken 2011
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Photo taken 2011
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Photo 2011
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Photo 2011
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Photo 2011
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Photo 2011
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Simeon Loverin 1834-1913, his wife Margaret Alguire 1844-10928

Graves:

 

David Morton Sanford

Died June 2, 1912

Aged 53 yrs.

Wealtha Hurlbert

Wife of David Morton

Died June 21, 1893

Aged 34 8 mos. 6 days

Margaret Alguire

1844 – 1928

Simeon Loverin

1834 k- 1913

Amanda Simeon Loverin

Died June 26, 1877

Loverin

illegible

Lucy Sanford

Died Sept. 3,, 1840

Illegible
Joseph Loverin

Died Feb. 21, 1815 (Baby)

Mother

illegible

Elizabeth wife of

Joseph Loverin

Died March 8, 1818

George Sanford

1844 k- 1926

Wife Eliza Hanes

1844 – 1930

Deleah wife of

David

Died Nov. 25, 1880

53 yrs.

White’s Corners – A Forgotten Hamlet in Elizabethtown

White’s Corners (Whitehurst and Orchard Valley)

 

1- 1861-62 Map of Elizabethtown

This forgotten community lies just east of Jellby, on the Jellby – North Augusta Road. The area is reached via the Greenbush Road to Greenbush, Rocksprings Road through its junction with the Jellby Road. Landmarks to look for are John Jelly’s old homestead and ¾ of a mile beyond that, Bill Jelly’s old home which is located at the exact centre of what was once White’s Corners.

The second cheese factory burned down around 1940, the old shingle mill vanished in decay over the years and the only reminder of what was White’s Corners is the former home of Bill Jelly. The cheese factory was known as The Orchard Valley Cheese Factory and was located across from what was Bill Jelly’s house. The Orchard Valley cheese factory was owned by Jim White and J. Cardwell Ferguson was the last operator when the factory burned down. In the 1930’s cheese was selling around 13¢ a pound

Few in the area recall the settlement that once flourished just east of Jellby, but the old Shiloh Church which served the settlers still rises majestically on Shiloh Road.

Originally four families of Whites settled in the area. They located east of where the Ottawa- Brockville CPR line was to run in later years and at their back door was the Augusta Township Line. They settled on the ninth and tenth concessions of Elizabethtown.

Joseph White was the first to settle, followed by his brothers Eli, Henry and George. On February 24, 1824, Joseph White fresh from his native Ireland, bought 100 acres of land on the west half of Lot No. 3 on the Tenth Concession , paying pioneer farmer Enoch Knowlton 100 pound sterling for the land.

Joseph White died February 20, 1835. The White’s are buried in the Bolton Cemetery.

The old Bolton School once stool on the property of Henry White. The school once stood near the Bolton Cemetery on Lot 5 of the Tenth Concession in Elizabethtown. There was also another school, Bell’s School, in the area that served the children’s educational needs. Bell’s school was located close to the Bell’s Cemetery.

The Bolton Cemetery was sometimes referred to as Whitehurst, from the name of a nearby railway crossing. Old maps show the crossing as Whitehurst and more modern maps call it Bell’s Crossing from the Bell families living around there. There was a post office nearby supplying the Jellyby area (Recorder and Tines, Darling Collection Book 3)

 

2- James White’s Cheese Factory at the corner of Jellyby Rd and Shilo Road

 

White’s Corners* 

as written by a descendant of John White

Lucy (Kilborn) White, was the wife of John White who died about 1817/18 at the age of 50 years.

After her husband’s death she and her sons moved to the northeast part of Elizabethtown in an area that borders on Augusta Township. Here they established a small village once known as “White’s Corners”. Lucy’s sons Eli and Henry settled on Lot 9 of the 9th Concession of Elizabethtown not far from the village of Jellby. In her later years Lucy lived with her son Joseph who had acquired land on Lot 10 of the 3rd Concession of Elizabethtown.

Lucy White lived into her eighties and when she died on March 15th, 1857 she was buried on Lot 5 of the 10th  Concession. She lies next to her son Joseph. Her stone reads “Lucy, wife of John White died (dates missing) age 84 years.

James White, the eldest son of Henry R.S. White and Sarah Berry, took over the family farm on the 9th Concession of Elizabethtown from his widowed mother probably when he was in his early twenties. The home lot on the 9th Concession was variously referred to as Whitehurst or Orchard Valley. It was here that James White constructed a cheese factory that became an important supplier of this product for the surrounding district.

According to Wilma White, a granddaughter of James White, “The Orchard Valley Cheese Factory was situated in a grove of apple trees on the corner of Shiloh and Jellyby Roads”. This corner was called appropriately. “Whites Corners. The original cheese factory burned down around the turn of the century (1900) and James White replaced it with another factory he purchased in a nearby community he called Roebuck. Unfortunately this factory also burned down in 1940, but this was long after the property had passed into the hands of the Jelly family.

“John Jelly recalls White’s Corners chiefly because of his son Bill Jelly who occupied the last home owned by the Whites here. His house was once the property of James White and at the rear doorstep lies a tombstone which once adorned the grave of Henry White in Bolton Cemetery.

The railway crossing a mile north of John Jelly’s farm is known as Bell’s Crossing, but more than 100 years ago it was called Whitehurst. There was a post office there supplying the Jellyby area” (Harry Painting “John Jelly recalls Paltry $37 Cheese Cheques” Brockville Recorder and Times March 27, 1981)

*Excerpts on White’s Corners are from the book “A White Family Odyssey 1635-1997, Massachusetts to British Columbia, Canada” by Robert White

Jellyby or Jellby- In researching this hamlet we have come across both spellings, and a sentence by someone that they never knew which was the correct spelling as Jellby was used by the old timers in the area.

3-W.H. Whites at Whites Corners was his first farm which he later sold when he moved to Greenbush

 

5-James and Annie White

 

4-Anna Pearson White

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6-James White’s Gingerbread Clock manufactured in Connecticut in the possession of his descendant Robert White

 

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7-Jim White’s Home at Whites Corners c1980
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9-Sarah Ann (Warren) White 1869
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8-Thomas White 1869

 

Shiloh – A Forgotten Hamlet in Elizabethtown

Shiloh  (Bell’s Crossing)

The hamlet of Shiloh is located at the intersection of Shiloh Road and the road to Rocksprings.

The old Bolton School once stool on the property of Henry White. The school once stood near the Bolton Cemetery on Lot 5 of the Tenth Concession in Elizabethtown.

A Methodist church was built here in 1882. It was built by three Methodists congregations, Hill’s Chapel in the 9th Concession; a congregation that worshipped in the Bell’s Schoolhouse and another congregation that worshipped at Bolton’s School house. The beautiful red brick structure served the community well. It is located on the tenth concession of Elizabethtown at the intersection of the Shiloh Road with the Rocksprings Road. When the church was built in 1882 its’ postal address was Whitehurst, a nearby community which at that time had a post office. Whitehurst was used as a postal address until 1911 when rural mail delivery came into effect. Then the postal address was changed to Jellby. Nearby Boulton Cemetery was the actual burying ground for the Shiloh Church.

(Recorder and Times, Darling Collection Book 3)

 

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Shiloh Church- photo July 2016
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Shiloh Church c1980 from the Recorder and Times

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

100th Anniversary Commemorative Plate for the Shilo United Church 1882-1982

 

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Remains of old Cosgrove Home c1980

 

 

The Athens Reporter and County of Leeds Advertiser

 Excerpts have been taken from this paper referencing the following hamlet for the years 1889, 1894 and 1895

Tuesday June 25, 1895 issue

Visitors –  Mrs. M. Kendrick and little daughter of Shilo is visiting friends here this week. (at New Dublin)

Bell’s Crossing – A Forgotten Hamlet in Elizabethtown

Bell’s Crossing (Shiloh, Whitehurst and White’s Corners)

 

“What was the neighbourhood at Bell’s Crossing called before the railway was put through there – was it Whitehurst? The name Whitehurst was simply the name of the post office, and as far as I can remember there was no post office bells-crossing-1861-62there before the railway (Brockville and Ottawa RR) was built. The name to most of us is a mystery, at the time many comments were made upon it. The reason generally given as to why it didn’t start with Bell was the railway said that there were already too many names starting with Bell.

 

Before the railway went through, the place was generally called the Bell Neighbourhood, and the school house always the Bell School house. The reason for this is that all the land around was owned by James Bell. The majority of all this land was simply wilderness when it was settled before 1831. There was a large section of wet swamp. The area where the railway went was practically filled with the original logs mixed with clay and some stone. What we called the ‘Island’ was surrounded by swamp through which a log road was built to drive over. Atkin’s Lake down to Cranberry was a big stream of water in which we all washed our sheep, and the boys would often go there to have a good bath.

 

As for the Shiloh Church, this Methodist Church was built after the church union of 1871 when the Wesleyan and New Connexion [sic] Methodist Churches became the Methodist Church of Canada. The Wesleyan Methodist Church worshipped in Bolton’s School House in what we commonly called ‘the Berry Neighbourhood’. After union these two congregations merged into one and built the Shiloh Church in a central place for all to come together for worship. This church was built upon the Moore property.” (Recorder and Times Letter to the editor, no date)

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Bell’s School taken in 1937
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Bell’s School class of 1937

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Bell’s Cemetery next to the school photo 2016
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Bell’s Cemetery taken 2016
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Bell’s Cemetery on the Rocksprings Road next to the school
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Bell’s Cemetery photo fall of 2015

 

 

 

Kerr Family Cemetery

Kerr Family Cemetery

Concession 9, Lot 25, Location: East side of County Road 7, just north of Greenbush, behind #9472 Cty Rd. 7, – Twp of Elizabethtown* – GPS- 44.701591, 75.858257

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photo 2012
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photo 2012
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photo 2012
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photo 2012
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photo 2012
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photo 2012
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photo 2012

 

 

List of Graves: 

 

Inserted “?” if not legible

 

KERR, Susan (daughter of George & Eleanor) – died February 5, 1863

KERR, Charlotte – 1841 to 1914

KERR, George – died 1881 at age 82 yrs.

KERR, Eleanor – died 1890 at age 76 yrs.

KERR, Elizabeth – 1839 to 1895

 

??, Sarah – not legible

 

YOUNG, Herbert H. – died 1898 at age 37 yrs.

 

YOUNG, John – died 1890 at age 83 yrs.

 

KERR, Susannah (wife of Michael Kerr) – died 1856 at age 43 yrs.

 

KERR, Edward – died 1839 at age 74 yrs.

 

KERR, Susannah (wife of Edward) – died 1851 at age 85 yrs.

 

CAVANAGH, Martin – died 1879 at age 61 yrs.

 

CAVANAGH, Margaret (wife of Martin) – died 1888 at age 90 yrs.

 

YOUNG, Humphrey R. (son of H.B. & S.) – died 1819 at 12 mos.

 

YOUNG, Maragret (wife of E.A. Horton) – 1859 to 1905

 

KERR, Jane (wife of John Young) – 1826 to 1892

 

HOSKINS, Joab – died 1892 at age 70 yrs.

HOSKINS, George – died 1870 at age 20 yrs.

HOSKINS, Abigail – died 1883 at age 9 yrs.

HOSKINS, Edward J. – died 1883 at age 9 yrs.

 

Hill Cemetery

Hill Cemetery

Concession: 10, Lot: 10; Location: north side of the Jellby Road, next to 10724 Jellby Rd. – Twp of Elizabethtown*, GPS- 44.741193, -75.803239

 

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Hill Cemetery Entrance photo Nov 2012

 

 

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Photo Nov 2012
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Photo Nov 2012
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Photo Nov 2012
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Photo Nov 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

George White – Died Juy 29, 1879 age 78 yrs
In Memory of Mary wife of George White, Died June 22, 1899, Aged 85 yrs & 10 mos “Gone but not forgotten”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In Memory of Maria Daughter of George & Mary White who died Sept 2, 1859 Aged 3 yrs, 6 ms, 4 days

 

Jane, Daughter of George White Died Feb 6, 1866, age 26 y, 7 mos & 12 D

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

L to R- Jane, George and May White

List of Graves: 

Inserted “?” if not legible

CANNON, James – died 1898 at age 72 yrs.

CANNON, Alice Armstrong (wife of James) – died 1912 at age 75 yrs.

CANNON, Priscilla (daughter of James and Alice) – died 1898 at age 38 yrs.

MCCULLY, Ann Elizabeth – died 1855 at age ?

MCCULLY, Andrew – died 1898 at age 73 yrs.

MCCULLY, Rebecca (wife of Andrew) – died 1868 at age 40 yrs.

HILL, Thomas – died 1855 at age 66 yrs.

HILL, Elizabeth – died 1870 at age 74 yrs.

CONDELL, Priscilla – died at 1803 at ?

HILL, Catherine – died ??

CONDELL, John

HILL, Thomas – died 1810 at age 87 yrs.

HILL, Olive L – died 1881 at age ??

Name not legible – died 1819

HILL, Richard – died 1885 at age 48 yrs.

WIFE Eliza Jane – died 1871 at age 39 yrs.

WIFE Elizabeth Cornell – 1849 to 1934

CORNELL, James

HILL, Rolland (son of Thomas & Mary) – died 1818 (may be incorrect) at age 11 yrs.

HILL, Thomas Henry – 1858 to 1915

WIFE Mary Bissell – 1854 to 1936

HILL, George Edward – died 1900 at age 37 yrs.

HILL, William – died 1902 at age 82 yrs.

HOPKINS, Francis Jamima – died 1898 at age 80 yrs.

Mrs. Norton Hill – July 1896 at age 23 yrs.

HILL,  ?? – 1860 – 1933

TURNER, Jessie A.- 1865 to 1961

GIBSON, Rebecca Hill Armstrong – died 1941 at age 69 yrs.

GIBSON, James – 1872 to 1950

ARMSTRONG, Sarah Eliza (daughter of Robert and Mary Armstrong) – died 18?? At age 33 yrs.

ARMSTRONG, Catherine (daughter of Robert and Mary) – died 1871 at age 24 yrs.

ARMSTRONG, Elizabeth P. (daughter of Robert & Mary) – died 1872 at age 17 yrs.

ARMSTRONG, Robert – died 1894 at age 83 yrs.

ARMSTRONG, Mary (wife of Robert) – died 1885 at age 69 yrs.

ARMSTRONG, Robert N. (son of Mary and Robert)- died 1890 at age 29 yrs.

???, Maria – not legible

WHITE, Jane (daughter of George White) – died 1886 at age 26 yrs.

WHITE, George – died 1873 at age 39 yrs.

WHITE, Mary (wife of George) – died 1899 at age 85 yrs.

ABLOW, Mary Jane – died 186?

Wife of William ??? – died 1875 at age 25 yrs.

ABLOW, William – died 1888 at age 77 yrs.

ELLARD, John – died 1859

ELLARD, Thomas – died 1858 at age 15 yrs….or months

Hanton Cemetery

Hanton Cemetery

Concession 9, Lot 14, 565 Kitley Line 8, Unregistered cemetery, east of Frankville on Kitley Line 8 Rd, on private property GPS: 44.742420, -75.926664

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Hanton Cemetery Fall of 2013
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Wm. Connor, died May 5, 1887
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Ellen Connor died April 28, 1887 aged 78 years
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Fall of 2013
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Fall of 2013
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Fall of 2013
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Fall of 2013
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William Mulvuagh Sep 20, 1819 – Jun 23 1896
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William Mulvaugh
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Sacred to the Memory of Mary Mulvaugh wife of Alonzo Soper, Who departed this life Jun 9th, 1859 age 51 years

 

Inserted a ‘?’ if not legible

Tombstones Names:

 

MULVAUGH, Mary wife of Alonzo Soper

Died Jan. 9, 1859 age 51 yrs.

MULVAUGH, William

Sept. 20, 1819 – June 23, 1896

4 gravestones – not legible
MULVAUGH, Jane wife of ?

187?

1 gravestone – not legible
SOPER, Andrew

Died Oct. 25, 1868 age 36 yrs.

REYNOLDS, Mary Ann wife of Robert E. Bates

Died Apr. 6, 1916 age 79 yrs.

GODRICH, Elizabeth wife of William Godrich

Died Jan. 25, 1856 age 30 yrs.

FERGUSON, William son of James and Anne

?

Eliza Anne ?

Maria E. ?

FERGUSON, Anne & James

?

ARNOLD, Margaret wife of Harold

1873

Francis, son of John

? age 2 days

SMITH, Henry

186?

CONNOR, Robert

Died Feb. 28, 1878 age 72

CONNOR, William Henry

Died Nov. 15, 1859 age 22 yrs.

Grave – not legible
CONNOR, William

Died May 5, 1887 age 90

Ellen, wife of William Connor

Died Apr. 28, 1887 age 78

HANTON, Hannah wife of Richard

Died Feb. 13, 1876 age 54 yrs.

Grave – not legible
HANTON, Jemima J.

Died June 30, 1877

HANTON, Frances wife of Richard

1803

HINTON, Ann

?

HANTON, William

Died Dec. 15, 1896 age 92

Johanna wife of William

Died July 6, 1905 age 87 yrs.`

2 graves – not legible
ALTIMUS, Jemima wife of
George AltimusDied Apr. 9, 1895 age 86
ALTIMUS, George

Died Nov. 18, 1882 age 84

ALTIMUS, Emma

Died Dec. 17, 1896 age 45 yrs.

ALTIMUS, George

Died Oct. 25, 1900 age 56 yrs.

ALTIMUS, Hannah

1857

Grave – not legible
? Elizabeth
HANTON, Elizabeth
3 Graves – not legible

 

 

 

Brown Cemetery

Brown Cemetery

Concession: 5, Lot: 4/5; Location: Bains Road, south of Manhard Cemetery; Cemetery Status: Closed to further burials – Privately Owned  GPS: 44.670993, -75.711386

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Brown Cemetery on a hill photo 2015

 

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Brown Cemetery Sign 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Ruben Brown Sept 25, 1900 – Aug 4, 1992 His beloved Wife Mildred M. Yateman, Jul 18, 1911 – Jan 9, 1985
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Robert C. Mulholland, 1932-2011 Beloved Husband of Luella J. Yateman, 1924-

 

 

 

Booth Burying Ground

Booth Burying Ground

Concession: 4, Lot: 32; Location: Seeley’s, on the west side of Perth Road between Kilkenny Road and Howe Road; Cemetery Status: Closed to further burials – Twp of Elizabethtown*, GPS: 44.584538,- 75.805278

 

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Sacred to the Memory of Charles Booth
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Photo taken Fall of 2015
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Photo taken Fall of 2015
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Photo taken Fall of 2015
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Photo taken Fall of 2015
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Photo taken Fall of 2015

 

Brockville & Westport Railway- Right of Way

Here are detailed maps of the old B&W right of way from Westport into Brockville. The maps detail the lots and concessions through which it passed as well as listing information on the date of purchase and from whom the right of way was purchased. There are a series of 24 maps detailing the right of way.

If you want to learn a bit more about the old B&W and discover where the route was located here is your chance.

(We realize that these images are hard to read, if you want to have a better copy email us with the Book Number that you want and we will send you the original image)

 

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Book 1- Westport
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Book 1 – Westport

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Book 2
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Book 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Book 3 – Newboro
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Book 3 – Newboro

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Book 4
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Book 4

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Book 5
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Book 5

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Book 6
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Book 6

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Book 7
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Book 7

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Book 8
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Book 8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Book 9 – Delta
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Book 9 – Delta

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Book 10
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Book 10

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Book 11
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Book 11

 

 

 

 

 

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Book 12
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Book 12

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Book 13 – Athens
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Book 13 – Athens

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Book 14
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Book 14

 

 

 

 

 

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Book 15
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Book 15

 

 

 

 

 

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Book 16
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Book 16

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Book 17
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Book 17

 

 

 

 

 

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Book 18
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Book 18

 

 

 

 

 

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Book 19
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Book 19

 

 

 

 

 

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Book 20 Lyn
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Book 20 – Lyn

 

 

 

 

 

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Book 21 – Lyn
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Book 21 – Lyn
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Book 21 – Lyn

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Book 22
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Book 22

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Book 23 – Brockville
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Book 23 – Brockville

 

 

 

 

 

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Book 24 – Brockville
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Book 24 – Brockville

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kitley- One Room School Houses

One Room School Houses in Kitley

 Blanchard School  (School Section No. 4 or 11)

Concession #1, Lot 26, built 1834

Coad School and Dack’s School  (School Section No. 6)

Concession #4, Lot 17, built early 19th Century

Cornell School  (School Section No. 9)

Concession #5, Lot 22, burned in 1865

Crystal School  (School Section No. 12)

Concession #7, Lot 6, built 1875

Frankville School

The old Frankville school was built in 1875 and served until a new school was built in 1975.

Hutton’s School   (School Section No. 1)

Concession #1, Lot 7, built late 1870’s

Judgeville School  (School Section No. 7)

Concession #4, Lot 26, built prior to1870

Kinch St. School  (School Section No. 8)

Concession #6, Lot 9, built 1840’s

Lake Eloida School  (School Section #17)

Concession #10, Lot 27

Lehigh’s School  (School Section #18)

Concession #9, Lot 22

Mahon’s School  (School Section No. 10)

Located at Bellamys Mills

Mitchell School  (School Section No. 14)

Concession #8, Lot 23, built late 1840’s

Motts Mills School  (School Section No. 3)

Concession #3, Lot 21, built c1833

Newbliss School  (School Section No. 5)

Concession #4, Lot 13, built late 1830’s

Rathwell’s School  (School Section #22)

(Wolford School Section No. 6)

Concession #4, Lot 4

Redan School  (School Section #20)

(Elizabethtown School Section # 26)

Concession 11, Lot 31 in Elizabethtown

Rock Springs School  (School Section # 19)

(Elizabethtown School Section #25)

Concession 10, Lot 22 in Elizabethtown

Shane’s School  (School Section No. 2)

Concession #1, Lot 9, in SouthElmsleyTownship

Soper’s School  (School Section No. 13)

(also known as Otterman’s School)

Concession #9, Lot 12, built 1850

 

Toledo

Toldeo had  3 log schools

Unidentified School

Concession #6 Lot 28, We cannot find a name for this school.

Manhard – A Hamlet in Elizabethtown

Manhard

This is only community in the eastern side of the township, because the only road north from Brockville was the 1-manhardnotorious and deserted “smugglers’ highway’, was Manhard. Manhard is located at the junction of the 5th Concession, at the edge of the Manhard Bog. It was settled by David Manhard, a German, and his many sons.

David Manhard built an imposing Inn in the 1830’s, the only stage coach stop between Brockville and Merrickville. It was two stories on the front, three at the back and a full for storeys at the end. It contained a lot of windows at a time when window glass was heavily taxed.(Elizabethtown: The Last of the Royal Townships by Alvyn Austin pub 2009)

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Manhard’s Inn built in 1830 (photo Alvyn Austin)

 

 

 

 

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Manhard Brothers photo taken in 1866

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Five Manhard Brothers

Sons of William Manhard, photographed on December 15th, 1866 are left to right: Henry 59, William 57, Seaman 53, Niamiah 51 and David 48.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Religion

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Manhard Church with horse sheds. photo not dated

Manhard United Church- the land for this church was purchased from David Manhard in December 1892 by the trustees of the Manhard settlement congregation of Wesleyan Methodists.  The church however opened its’ doors on December 24, 1871, 21 years before the land was officially purchased.

In 1871 Manhard was part of the North Augusta Circuit with Mr. David Manhard as local leader.  In 1884 it became part of the Maitland circuit. In 1904 it again changed becoming part of the Augusta circuit and the name changed to the Algonquin Circuit. The parsonage was changed from Maitland to the corner brick house in Algonquin.

After Union in 1925 this residence was sold and one was purchased in North Augusta to become the United Church Manse. In 1971 the circuit was known as the North Augusta Pastoral Charge.

 

Taken from the Brockville Recorder, Thursday, December 7, 1871:

“Dedication: A new Weysleyan Church has been erected in the Manhard neighbourhood, a few miles from Brockville. The church will be dedicated Sunday the 24th The Chairman of the district, Rev. J. Williams, will preach in the morning and other clergy in the afternoon and evening. Services commence at half past ten, half-past two, and half-past six. A collection will be taken at the close of each service. A tea meeting is also to be held on the 28th when speeches and music will be the order of the day.”

Originally the church had a gallery at the back. The porch was built in the 1930’s and was used as a woodshed and housed two box stoves. When the gallery was removed the stoves were moved inside.

The following information is taken from the booklet “Centennial of Manhard United Church 1871-1971

“The church received its name “Manhard” because of the many Manhards who had settled in the area.

Previous to the building of the church people worshiped in the Manhard School (on the 6th Concession) as early as 1859. This being the only place of worship, the people of Fairfield joined with them walking a distance of 2 ½ miles.

Those were the days of the horse and buggy. Sheds were built to shelter the horses in all kinds of weather. They were constructed to extend in a North-South direction.

The ground floor was used as a dining space. Booths were outside for selling ice cream. Varied programmes of music and humour followed the hot supper of delicious home cooked food.

No porch existed until the early thirties. Originally there was a gallery in the church. The back of the church had two doors at the entrance, There was a large wood box in the porch which fed two huge box stoves inside, thus having no wood inside the church. Electric lights replaced the kerosene lams in 1951 and electric heat replaced the antique wood stoves in 1965.

Young People’s Association

During the ministry of Rev. Lalonde, 1929-1930, a young people’s group was organized. About fifty members met in homes every two weeks for social, literary, devotional and missionary programmes. During the war years the association disbanded as attendance was dwindling due to some of the boys  going into the services and others to projects outside the community.

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Manhard Sunday School Picnic in Hough Woods 1892
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Manhard Sunday School 1971

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ladies Organization

In the early years a Ladies’ Aid group of dedicated women held meetings and raised money to help finance the work of the church.

After Union in 1930 the Women’s Association was organized in accordance with the Manual of the United Church under the guidance of G.F. Lalonde with Mrs. Charles Edwards as the president and Mrs. Fred Bain as Sectary Treasure.  This organization raised money in various ways such as quilting, socials, chicken suppers, crokinole parties, and penny bag races where members were divided into sides, the losers preparing delicious meals, the winners humorous concerts. Travelling baskets were used where each member contributed an article as well as purchasing one and it went on its way.

In 1962 under the leadership of Ref. James Gibson the W.A. became a new organization known as the ‘United Church Women’. In 1971 with Mrs. Edward Williams as president it continued to raise raise money in various ways for the upkeep of Missions, Manse, Camp for Youth, Summer Schools, etc.

 

 

Manhard’s School (School Section # 13)

Located on the 6th Concession

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Manhard School c1860

from the School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

1850: Stone Building, size 18×24, construction date 1847, condition: Good

1854: Stone building, first opened in 1844

 

 

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Manhard Church July 2016
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Manhard Church July 2016
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Manhard Church interior July 2016

 

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Manhard Cemetery across from the church July 2016
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Manhard Cemetery July 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Addison- A Village in Elizabethtown

Addison (Lewis’ Corners)

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Addison from a map of 1861-62

The stone home that sits on the south west corner of the intersection at Addison, was built by a Mr. Lewis as a dwelling, but legend says that it was once an inn, a hotel, and later a general store. In the palmy days of the stagecoaches, it was a stagecoach station. Stables at the rear catered to the stage horses and provided shelter for the steeds used by horseback wayfarers, who stopped at the inn.

The house was strategically located at an intersection of country roads. From Brockville, the old Perth trail ran past the front door and veranda. The Greenbush- Addison- Athens road crossed the Perth Road at the intersection. In the pioneer days these were mere dirt roads, rutted in spring and fall, sometimes impassable because of the mud the spring and fall rains created.

Two United Empire Loyalists built most of the old stone houses still standing in this area. They were John Ketchum Jr. and Ira Lewis. Mr. Lewis was a refugee from the American Revolutionary War, who volunteered to fight for the British and Canadian Forces in the War of 1812. For his service to the Crown, Mr. Lewis gained a share of a special $50,000.00 fund set up by the Government of Upper Canada for 1812 veterans.

He married Phoebe, daughter of the founder of Lyn, Abel Coleman and they settled in Addison. Mr. Lewis then built the stone building on the corner in Addison.

Mr. Lewis also built an ashery near the house and ran a flourishing business. At one time he employed eight workers, working day and night producing potash, soda and lye for soap making. He shipped his products to Brockville and from there they were taken overseas for sale in Britain and the European continent.

John Ketchum was a United Empire Loyalist from Connecticut who fled the aftermath of the American Revolutionary War and reached Canada a few years before 1798 but did not reach this area until 1800. Mr. Ketchum built two of the Blanchard stone houses south of Addison.

For the first half of the 19th century, there were a couple of grist mills operating here. In 1873 one of the mills was replaced by a cheese factory, producing Addison cheese for 70 years until it closed in 1942. The factory was then turned into a feed mill and store.

Though a small village, Addison at one time, boasted its own newspaper. Bethuel Loverin, descendant of Greenbush area pioneers, farmed southwest of Addison. He was secretary of the Unionville Agricultural Fair and in addition to farming, he sold farm machinery.

In 1880 Mr. Loverin made a trip to Northern New York State and returned with a small printing press. He set up the machine in a room of his farm dwelling, and began turning out notices for sales and other advertising material. Then he decided to print a newspaper, and the “Addison Reporter” was born.

At first the Addison Reporter was a one page weekly. As he began to gather news, Mr. Loverin expanded the newspaper, but he soon realized that Athens, still known as Farmersville in the 1880’s, was ripe for a newspaper. He moved his operation to Farmersville and the “Athens Reporter” came into existence May 22, 1884.

In its heyday, Addison boasted two hotels, a stagecoach station, post office, two grist mills, a cheese factory, livery stable, shoemaker’s shop, barber shop, lumber business, livestock market, a newspaper, a millinery shop, dry goods store and two grocery stores.

Village Schools

The village’s first school was housed in an unused room of the Taplin Blacksmith Shop. Pioneer Thomas Taplin, who fled from Vermont after the American Revolutionary War, was the first school teacher.

In the 1820’s a log school was erected to replace the one room educational centre in the smithy. This building gave way to a stone school which served Addison for 90 years.

Charles O. Stowell, who married the two daughters of John Ketchum, was born in Massachusetts February 17, 1797. Educated in the United States he came to Canada as a young man with a teaching certificate. In 1832 he took a teaching job at the old Addison school about 200 yards south of the old Perth Trail. This pioneer log school was later torn down and the school moved into the Methodist Church. When the Methodists build a new stone church on the other side of the road, now the Addison United Church, the old house of worship became a permanent school. This school served the community for 90 years until it became unfit for school purposes. It ended its days as a stable on the Scott Farm, where it eventually gave way to decay and collapsed.

A wooden frame school replaced the stone structure and in the late 1960’s it was closed. The Addison School was listed as S.S.no. 21 (for additional photos of the school go to our post on “One Room School Houses in Elizabethtown)

(Recorder & Times c1980, Darling Scrapbook No.3 pages 1-9)

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Addison School notice the boy without shoes
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Addison School House taken in 2016
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Addison School, Notice the Turnstile for a gate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cyrenus Stowell

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Cyrenus Stowell Home in Addison, taken from Leavitt History pub 1879

“Oliver O. Stowell was born in Massachusetts, February 19th, 1797. He came to Canada and began teaching at Lewis’ Corners about 47 years ago. At that time Ira Lewis Esq. was keeping a hotel at the Corners. After teaching about four years, Mr. Stowell devoted his attention to farming, settling on Lot No. 36 in the 8th Concession of Elizabethtown. He married Harriet Ketchum, who died in 1843; he subsequently married Abigail, a sister of his first wife. His son Cyrenus Stowell is a successful agriculturist, his farm being a model of neatness and order, in fact second to none in the wealthy Township of Elizabethtown. He has two children, Charles Mason and Edward Norman.”

(History of Leeds and Grenville by Thad. Leavitt pub 1879)

 

Coleman Lewis and the Lewis Family

At an early age, Ira Lewis ran away from home in Connecticut. At the time of his departure, he was a boy without money, and had no settled idea as to his destination. When he set out on his travels, he found a horse shoe, which he sold for 12 ½ ¢. He invested the money in a boys’ lottery and fortunately drew the highest prize of $1.00. With this ‘mine of wealth’, he journeyed to Ogdensburg, N.Y., a distance of 200 miles. After remaining in Ogdensburg a few years he proceeded to Brockville and from there to Lyn, where he opened a shoe shop (having learned the trade in Ogdensburg). While a resident of Lyn, he married Phoebe Coleman. Not being contented with the village, he removed to Brockville, but soon returned again to Lyn where he resided until 1824. During the year 1824 he purchased land at the point where the present village of Addison is located. After moving to that place, he for many years, operated a shoe shop, a farm and inn. During the War of 1812, he entered the British service, and subsequently received a pension for his patriotic conduct.

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Coleman Lewis Home, taken from Leavitt History pub 1879

“Mr. Lewis’ eldest son, Wellington, married Cordelia Wilson. Coleman married Melinda Taplin; he is one of the most successful merchants in the County of Leeds, having conducted the mercantile business in Phillipsville and Addison, where he resides, carrying on a general store and a large farm. Two of his sons are also engaged in commercial pursuits: Levi S. at Newboro, and Charles H. at Brockville. Mr. Lewis’ residence is an elegant brick structure, a view of which is given in this work. Sarah Lewis married Mr. Adams of Oxford, Ira Jr. married Julia Dwight a grand-daughter of President Dwight of Yale College, Ira being a graduate of that University and a barrister. He practices his profession at Goderich, Ontario. William H. married Angelina Gates; Mary Louisa married Alfred Nelson of the Canadian Land Company, Toronto. We learned from Ira Lewis Sr. that the first house built in Farmersville was a log tavern which was kept by a man named Dickson.”

(History of Leeds and Grenville by Thad. Leavitt pub 1879)

Lewis Corners

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Addison the corners in detail from a map of 1861-62

The original farm belonging to John Ketchum stretched from the present school site north to what is now Highway 29.

Where the road leading to the Ketchum farm intersected the old Perth Road (Hwy 29), the small settlement was known as Lewis Corners. The Lewis family had settled at the crossroads in 1784, built up a hamlet, and opened an inn and hotel, which is now used as a private dwelling.

(Recorder and Times; Darling Collection Book No.3)

 

 

 

 

 

Anglican Church – The land for this church was purchased from Levi Munroe in 1915 for $20.00. The cornerstone was laid in August, 1916 and completed in December of the same year.

“The church was a crenulated castle as a split from the Irish church at Redan, three miles north, which was considered too ‘high church’ because it put a cross on its steeple” (Elizabethtown: The Last of the Royal Townships, by Alvyn Austin pub 2009)

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Anglican Church c1958
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Methodist Church Built in 1881
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Anglican Church
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Interior of Anglican Church

Bethuel Loverin [1]

At one time Addison boasted a newspaper, which was a small sheet of paper, double about the size of a window pane. Bethuel Loverin owned the printing press, which was operated on his farm, situated next to the Stowells. He hired two printers, Lewis and Luther Murphy, twin brothers. Later the press was moved to Farmersville and in the passing of the ‘Addison Reporter’ we find the origins of the ‘Athens Reporter’.

In his early life Mr.Loverin followed farming for a time, and was secretary of the Unionville Fair for many years, travelling about the country as a machine agent, and installing Lodges of the Good Templars throughout the counties of Leeds and Grenville, and in New York State. He had always been greatly interested in printing, and in 1880 he bought a small press and started printing sale bills, fair notices etc. at his farm near Addison.

 

Potash [1]

While some farmers converted the ashes into potash themselves, it was more usual to sell the ashes to a potash factory.

At the Lewis ashery in Addison, “from eight to ten men were employed day and night, manufacturing the collected ashes into potash, soda and lye.”

The Telephone [1]

In 1878, the first telephone exchange in Canada was opened in Hamilton and in 1880, the Bell Telephone Company of Canada was organized. The telephone came soon after to Brockville as it was on the main line from Toronto to Montreal.

Brockville got its first telephone exchange in March, 1881 but only twelve subscribers out of a population of 7,000 were bold enough to have telephones installed.

It is no exaggeration to say that the people of those days were incredulous when they heard of the marvel of the telephone. That they would be able to speak to neighbours and friends who were out of sight and beyond ordinary hearing distance, seemed unbelievable. Indeed early users of the telephone used to shout into the instrument, thinking it would enable the other person to hear better.

When a demonstration of the long distance telephone service was held in Prescott, a farmer participated. He was amazed to hear voices speaking from Brockville, eleven miles away. On his return home he told a neighbour about the ‘miracle’, but the neighbour refused to believe it. “Utterly impossible and a complete fabrication”, he protested.

Addsion Rural Telephone Company, established in 1908, was purchased by Bell in 1964.

[1] Leeds and Grenville, their first two hundred years by Ruth McKenzie

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Milk delivery to Addison General Store
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Quinns General Store
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Howe bros of Addison the house is on the east side of the road LtoR Levi, Carman, Harold and Fred
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Howe Family Gathering on their front porch
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Florida House Hotel, Addison
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Calamity Janes in Addison
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Flemming House Hwy 29 Addison
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Ira Lewis Hotel operated in 1830 (Photo Alvyn Austin)
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Welcome to Addison, woman unknown
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Orange Lodge Building (Photo Alvyn Austin)
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Methodist Church, Addison
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Rev. R.H. Whiteside pastor Addison United Church 1933-35

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Patterson’s Hardware Store at Addison c1975

 

 

 

 

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Addison Savings Bank Advertisement in “The Athens Reporter” 1892
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Advertisement from The Athen’s Reporter c1889

 

“Edna’s Scrapbook”

is a paperback book written by Edna B. Chant and was published in 1998. Edna Chant was a reported with the “Athens Reporter” for 23 years and she is the author of four books.

Her book, which is made up of news clippings from various sources, from which we have taken excerpts, gives us a glimpse into life in our area for over a hundred year period ending with stories from 1975.

While her book covers many areas of Leeds and Grenville we have only focused on the area within Elizabethtown-Kitley Township.

Her book, which is made up of news clippings from various sources, from which we have taken excerpts, gives us a glimpse into life in our area for over a hundred year period ending with stories from 1975.

While her book covers many areas of Leeds and Grenville we have only focused on the area within Elizabethtown-Kitley Township.

 

Addison

On August 3, 1890, two Addison men had a horse race to settle a bet and after the race, the winning horse seemed to be breathing heavily. It was decided to let off a little blood to relieve tension, but they could not get the bleeding stopped and the horse bled to death.

The barns and sheds of Horace Booth near Addison were burned on July 15, 1891 of unknown causes. No insurance was carried.

Two young men from Addison had reason to visit some lady friends at Forthton on January 22, 1895 and they tied their horse and cutter in John Forth’s shed. When they started home, they noticed that the horse was having great difficulty in travelling and pulling the cutter. When they got out to investigate they saw they had been making a track like a steamboat, and they found they had one of Mr.Forth’s pig troughs firmly wedged between the runners. It was all they could do to dislodge it, but finally were on their way home, the horse travelling on wings of light.

On April 26, 1895 an Addison man Chancey Botsford, was fatally injured when he fell from the platform of a moving train and had his right leg and his left foot cut off. He only lived a few minutes.

For some weeks a demented woman has been haunting Addison area and Redan. She stays in the swamp but comes out to farmhouses for food. One farmer caught her milking his cow, and she told him she was on her way to Ottawa. It is not know who she is or where she came from. On May 15, 1898, a group of men banned together to try to catch her, and take her to the insane asylum for treatment and care, but she ran deep into the swamp and eluded them.

The home of Philander Brown at Addison was burned on April 18, 1898 Neighbours were able to carry out most of the furniture.

An aged Addison man had no home, and had been going from farm to farm begging. A group of men got together and built him a small shack. But that didn’t solve the food problem On Nov 20th a meeting was called to discuss the problem. One farmer agreed to give him room and board for the winter for $40. A canvass was made of the village and $16. was collected. One farmer gave the huge sum of ten cents. It is hoped the remaining $24. can be collected.

A tramp was found in a barn at Addison on December 19, 1900. He was in a very sad condition. Both feet were frozen solid and he was taken to hospital where one foot had to be amputated, and all toes were removed from the other foot. He told police his name was Ryan and he gave his address as Montreal.

The beautiful home of Edward Duffield ¾ of a mile north of Addison was burned on January 20, 1907. It was a large frame house and one of the finest in the country and formerly occupied by Cyrenus Stowell of Brockville. Neighbours were able to carry out some of the furniture.

On March 28, 1908 fire destroyed the home of Frank Wiltse at Addison. Nothing was saved except for a few chairs. Overheated stove pipes were the cause.

James W. Brown of Addison age 79 years, died on February 13, 1920. He was going to his barn and slipped on ice and fell injuring his hip and was unable to rise. He was found four hours later by his son Malcome of Athens. Death was due to pneumonia. Ten children survive.

An Addison woman had an odd accident. She was hanging out cloths and took hold of the wire clothesline, and then found she could not let go. Her family and several neighbours offered advice but nothing helped. The line was then cut on each side of her hand which was then soaked in hot water. After several minutes her fingers opened.

The barns of W.H. Murphy of Addison were burned on July 20, 1917 after being struck by lightning. Volunteers were able to save the house, but one side was badly scorched.

Joseph Greenham 57 of Addison was drowned in a water tank May 3, 1921

Derk Vandermear, 7, was killed by a car near Addison on June 28, 1951

The barns of Asa Peterson at Addison were destroyed by fire June 27, 1953

On February 22, 1956 Nancy Ann Moore, 19, of Lyn District and Gerald Walker of Addison district were found dead in a car.

The home of Stanley Madigan of Addison was burned on June 8, 1958

On February 14, 1963 the home of Mr. and Mrs. William Djkes of Addison area was burned. The couple were visiting neighbours for the evening and when they returned home at 10:45 pm they saw a light in the window. When they opened the door they were met by flames. Mrs. Djkes ran back to the neighbours to call the fire department, but couldn’t get through. Mr. Djkes and his neighbour, Mr. Gringhuis tried to fight the fire with snow, but the flames gained the upper hand. They got all the cattle out of the nearby barn and by using snow were able to save it.

At the end of 1964, one of the few remaining telephone companies in eastern Ontario went out of existence when the Addison Rural Independent Telephone Co. was purchased by the Bell Telephone Company.

Theodore Martin Vanasseldonk, 16, of RR 1 Addison was fatally wounded in a hunting accident on the family farm.

Mrs. Anna Merkx, 62, of Addison was killed on 401 Highway.

 

Grant’s Creek

Crossing Grant’s Creek

The creek takes its name from the original settlers of the area the Grant Family. We are fortunate to have old post cards, prints and photos showing how the original bridge looked. Today as you drive along the highway, you can cross the creek without really even knowing it’s there.

 

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The mouth of Grants Creek as it flows into the St. Lawrence River c1900
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Grant’s Creek Bridge from an old postcard c1900
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Grant’s Creek Bridge looking south
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Grant’s Creek Looking towards the St. Lawrence River c1900

Brockville Cemeteries

The Brockville Cemeteries

The cemetery comprises 14 acres of land on either side of the highway. It has been owned and operated by the City of Brockville since 1860, when all the older in-town cemeteries were closed and the graves moved into this area.

The land was purchased from the Grant Family. The land south of the highway had been granted by the Crow to Sgt. Allen Grant in 1789. This land was divided into three sections for use by the Anglicans, Roman Catholics and other Protestant denominations.

In 1890 an additional 46 acres were purchased on the north side of the highway and the area was named Oakland Cemetery.

For additional photos of these cemeteries, look on our website for Cemeteries in Elizabethtown.

 

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Wood & Buchanon Undertakers, c1890
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Oakland Cemetery c1890
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Oakland Cemetery c1890

 

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From the Brockville Recorder

May 16, 1850 On purchasing land for a new cemetery

 

At a meeting of the town council held on Monday evening previous, tenders were received for land for a public cemetery for Brockville. There were three offers, viz.: A lot of 20 acres belonging to R.Bell, at £15 per acre, one of 15 acres belonging to Mrs. Jas. Dack, at £7 10s an acre, and a lot of 12 acres belonging to Allan Grant, at £13 per acre. It was agreed that the committee should examine the ground and when satisfied as to the most eligible site, call a public meeting of the inhabitants of the town to decide whether the corporation should purchase the ground, or be obliged to private parties for the liberty of interment, or “when this liberty cannot be obtained, that they be compelled to pitch the dead into any hole or ditch that may be most convenient to their dwellings.” Messrs. Rankin and Crawford were the only two members of the council opposed to the purchase of ground from the funds of the corporation.

 

 

 

 

 

Brockville Cemetery Memorial Works

The Brockville Cemetery Memorial Works

Just past the Lyn road on the south side of the highway you would come to this next business.

Lancelot de Carle was the founder of the business now known as Brockville Cemetery Memorial Works.

Lancelot de Carle was first in business in Prescott on that town’s King Street one door west of Norton Miller’s bookstore. De Carle advertised gravestones, monuments etc. in marble, granite or sandstone.

His first local plant was set up in 1861 at No.8 Railroad Street, Brockville north to the railway tracks and it is presumed that the marble works were located on the west of the street near its junction with King Street. The street began life with the name Buell Street, but for some years was known as “Railroad St.” n it reverted back to Buell and has been known by that name ever since.

In the 1866 Fuller’s Directory of Brockville, Lancelot’s business was identified as “Central Canada Marble and Stone Works”

In 1875 the de Carle works passed into the hands of Lancelot’s son Leopold. The plant moved in 1869 from Railroad Street to a point on the south side of old No.2 Highway near the Brockville Cemetery.

Leopold called his factory “Brockville Cemetery Marble Works”. The family chose the site in order to be close to the burying grounds However, de Carle stones blossomed in cemeteries throughout the United Counties.

Their two story headquarters was equipped with pneumatic drills for engraving and used the most modern machinery of the times as well as employing highly skilled mechanics.

Leopold de Carle himself was an expert craftsman as well as an astute businessman and a pillar of the community. His literature proclaimed “Always on hand a large stock of finished work fro which to select in marble and granite. I import direct from the famous granite quarries in Scotland and Sweden and also from various quarries in Canada and the United States. Superior Designs and lowest estimate supplied on application”

John Johnston, who lived on the Lyn Road not far from the marble works was employed as one of the stone masons carving and chiselling the various headstones.

“Fred W.Grant took over the business in 1946. He joined the firm at 18 in 1927 and retired in 1974. Fred died on January 14, 1983. In 1966 the original building was torn down and relocated a short distance to the east of the original building. The reason for this move was that with a four lane highway running right in front of the door, parking had become almost non existent. The new brick building will feature a modern design and new equipment. It is built to the east of the old one and has ample parking facilities.” (R&T June 15, 1966)

The business was sold to George and Peter Rigos of Kingston.

(excerpts from the R&T- Darling Scrapbook No. 1 pg 135)

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Marble Works c1900

 

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Advertisement from Fuller’s Directory 1866

 

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LeCarle Marble Works Notice that is was right on the road
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LeCarle Marble Works
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LeCarle Marble Works

 

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Advertisement from Fuller’s Directory of 1866
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John Johnston is the tall man in the centre of this photo c1890

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Taken in the winter, notice the narrowness of the road and the closeness of the old building to the cemetery c1890

 

 

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F.W.Grant c1961
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F.W.Grant Memorial Works c1961
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F.W.Grant Memorial Works c1961

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nedow’s Garage

Nedow’s Garage

If on you trip along the highway your car had problems, you could always pull into Nedow’s Garage on the corner of the Lyn Road and Hwy No. 2. Bill Nedow was the owner and operator of this establishment. He operated a car junk yard and if you were ever looking for a part, you could usually count on Bill to find it for you.

As well as the garage, Bill Nedow also acted as the Willys Jeep Dealer for this area for many years.

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Bill Nedow standing next to the Jeep c1960
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Nedow’s Garage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Willys Jeep Sales

The Lyn Road

The Lyn Road

The first road leading north from the highway after leaving Brockville is the Lyn Road, almost across from the Skating Rink. The Lyn Road played an important part in the war of 1812, as it was a major link between this area and Kingston. It was a forced road, meaning that it was not a “planned “concession road. People and wagons full of goods would go north on this road through the Village of Lyn and then on to Young Mills and west to Kingston.

Around 2010 the County of Leeds and Grenville eliminated the name Lyn Road and adopted a new name for the road “County Road 46”. The road still goes to Lyn as it has for over 200 years, but this road to Lyn has lost all traces of its historical significance as the Lyn Road, and has been reduced to a mere number.

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Notice the Tape placed over the Rd. on the sign, a real cover-up job by the counties (photo Sep 2016)
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Lyn Road at Highway No.2 (Photo Sept 2016)

 

 

 

 

 

 

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An accident in the 1950’s
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An accident in the ’50’s notice McLean’s Mink farm in the background

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Lyn Road shown on a map from 1861-62

 

Riverside Park Ice Skating

Riverside Park Ice Skating Rink

Across from the mink farm, during the winters of the 1930’s was an open air skating rink that was enjoyed by both the people of Brockville and Elizabethtown.

Located on the south side of the highway, across from the Lyn Road, the rink was lit up at night and if you wanted something hot to drink the Dew Drop Inn was located just to the east of the rink.

 

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Riverside Park c1930
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Riverside Park c1930
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Dew Drop Inn c1935

This ice skating rink was started by Victor deCarle. He had a strong interest in the development of young hockey players, and formed the Riversides Hockey Club. This eventually led to the building of a large open air hockey and skating rink opposite the Dew Drop Inn, a short distance west of Brockville. He not only engineered the preliminary preparations for the rink, but actively engaged in its construction. (The Brockville Recorder)

McLeans Mink Farm

McLeans Mink Farm

I may be off on the name of this business, but not the location or the memories of the odours coming from the buildings at feeding time. If you drove by this operation in the 1950’s and 60’s with your car windows open you would get the fishy smell of the food that they fed to the numerous cages of mink.

The mink building and cages were located to the west (Left) of the building.

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Photo taken in 2016
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Photo taken in 2016

The Brockville Country Club

The Brockville Country Club

Established in 1914 this club was originally a nine hole golf course with 7 holes on the south side of the highway and two on the north side. The original clubhouse was burned in 1937 and a newer clubhouse on the same spot was built to replace it. The clubhouse was located on the south side of the highway and had access to the river.

In 1976 the Country Club sold the existing portion of its property on the south side of the highway, and built a new clubhouse and curling rink on the north side and expanded to an 18 hole course.

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Country Club c1960

The clubhouse and part of the gold course are within the Brockville City limits, while the rest of the course is in Elizabethtown-Kitley Township.

 

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Brockville Country Club c1966
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Original Clubhouse 1935 before the fire of 1937

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Brockville Golf and Curling Club c1984 on the north side of Hwy No. 2

 

 

 

 

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Aerial View of Country Club before it was closed and moved to the north side of Highway No. 2

Brockville

Brockville

We started our trip entering Elizabethtown from the east. Just as we passed the Ontario Hospital we would have noticed the sign welcoming us to Brockville. At this point Hwy No. 2 turns into King St East.

“Brockville was the first police village (1832) in Upper Canada, when its population reached 1000; the first incorporated town in 1850; and finally in 1962 the City of Brockville.” [1]

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Fluford Place, home of George T. Fulford

The first thing you would have noticed was the magnificent home of George T. Fulford, who made his fortunes selling “Pink Pills for Pale People”. Just down the road and on the north side of the road is the Fulford Home for Women. Another impressive large building built by George Fulford for ageing women.

 

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Fulford Home for women

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Homes on the south side of King St. East

 

 

 

 

We  would then drive by the large stately homes of the more wealthy Brockville families. Soon we would find ourselves in the downtown core of the town, named after Sir. Isaac Brock, Hero of the War of 1812.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Over the decades the stores would change hands, but the streets and shops would be bustling with customers. If you happened to drive through on a Wednesday afternoon, you would notice closed signs on all the stores, as the merchants would only keep their stores open for a half day.

In front of the City Hall building, King Street would change from King St east to King Street west. You would travel further along King Street West with more stores lining each side of the street, until you reached Perth Street, the old Highway to Perth.

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King Street looking east towards City Hall
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King Street looking east with the Capitol Movie Theater on the right
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King Street Looking East
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King Street looking West with the Revere Hotel on the left

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

At this point you would be leaving the downtown core. After driving up and over the old railway bridge, with its’ wooden deck known as the Kingston Bridge, you would again find yourself driving along residential lined streets. As you get to the westerly end of the town you would notice a large structure with sprawling buildings knows as Phillips Electrical Works. And across from that was St. Lawrence Park, where many youngsters learned how to swim and had summer picnics with their families.

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Swimming at St.Lawrence Park
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Phillips Electrical Company

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You would soon be driving out of the city and re-entering Elizabethtown on the west side of Brockville, where King Street turns back into Hwy No.2

[1] Elizabethtown: The Last of the Royal Townships by Alvyn Austin

 

Louise Crummy McKinney – Our People, Our Heritage

Louise C. McKinney

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Louise Crummy McKinney 1868 to 1931

Louise Crummy McKinney was the first woman to be elected to a parliament seat in the British Empire. She accomplished the feat in 1917 in Alberta.

Louise was the seventh child and second daughter of Richard Crummy and his wife the former Ester Empey. Richard Crummy was an immigrant from County Cavan, Ireland; Ester was a descendant of the pioneer Empey family of Easton’s Corners. She was born on September 22nd, 1868 in an old log cabin on the Crummy homestead along the north shore of Lake Eloida, on the Lake Eloida Road. The family farm on Concession 9, Lot 27 (Kitley Township) remained in the family possession until 1948, when Louise’s brother Albert Edwin and his wife retired and moved to Frankville.

 

She attended the old Mitchell public school, which is about a half mile from the Crummy Homestead and two miles west of the village of Frankville. She went on to Athens High School graduating in 1884 at age 16. Being too young to attend Normal School Louise stayed at home for a year and began Normal School in the fall of 1885. Louise Crummy graduated from Ottawa Normal School with a teacher’s certificate. She spent the next six years teaching in various Leeds County schools.

Wanderlust struck Louise Crummy in 1892 and she took off for Drayton, Pembina County, ND to join a sister, Edith, who lived there and was married to Joseph Morrison. She resumed her teaching career and also became an active member of the Women’s Christian Temperance Union.

In 1896 Louise wed a North Dakota farmer, James McKinney. James McKinney was born near Stittsville, Ontario, but had moved with his family to North Dakota. After a two year courtship Jimmy and Louise wed at the Crummy homestead on March 10, 1896. After seven years here they moved to a farm near Claresholm, Alberta in 1903. They ran a 200 acre spread there.

Still active in WCTU affairs, Louise turned to politics. She shunned the old parties, Conservatives and Liberals, but instead took out a membership in a women’s political organisation, the Non-Partisan League.

In the 1917 Alberta provincial election, Louise won a smashing victory in Claresholm riding, carrying the banner of the NPL into the Alberta Legislature. She was a popular figure in her home riding and rolled up an impressive vote total. She served her riding for five years 1917 to 1921 inclusive.

Her victory was hailed by the Calgary Nutcracker, an independent newspaper, in these words: “The NPL platform is the only place where high minded women in this province can stand with dignity and clean feet. For this reason, the first woman to occupy a seat in a legislature in the Dominion of Canada bears the NPL standard which in itself is a tribute to the women of Alberta and indicates a new political regime.” The Nutcracker called Louise Crummy McKinney “a credit to any legislative assembly in any country.”

She backed social legislation in the Alberta house, and sponsored a petition to Ottawa to include women in appointees to the senate. Her nominee as the first woman in the senate was Emily Murphy, a long time Edmonton advocate of women’s rights.

The Supreme Court of Canada turned down the petition in 1928, but un-daunted Louise fired off another petition to the Imperial Privy Council in London, England.

This time she hit pay dirt. The Supreme Court of Canada had vetoed the original petition on the grounds that the British North American Act only specified that ‘person’ could be appointed to he senate and did not specifically state that women were eligible.

The Privy Council ruled otherwise, decided that ‘women’ were indeed ‘persons’ and entitled to the same consideration as ‘men.’ The ruling paved the way for the appointment of Emily Murphy to the Canadian Senate in 1931.

In 1925, she was appointed a commissioner in the first general council of the United Church of Canada. She was the only woman to sign the “Basis of Union” declaration which created the United Church.

On July 10th 1931, Louise Crummy McKinney died at the age of 63 at her homestead in Claresholm. Her husband James followed her in death seven months later. Their son, J. Willard McKinney became a physician in Berlin, New Hampshire. Thirty-three years after her death Alberta erected a plaque to her memory as the first woman legislator in the empire.

 

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Stamp honouring Louise McKinney issued in 1981
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Louise Crummy McKinney 1868 to 1931

 

 

Acheson Cemetery

Acheson Cemetery

Concession 5, Lot: 26; Location: Hwy 29 north of Brockville, across from Weagant Farm Supplies; Cemetery Status: Closed to further burials – Twp of Elizabethtown*, GPS not available

Photos by B.Gibson, taken fall 2015

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Taken in the fall of 2015
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Taken in the fall of 2015

 

 

 

 

 

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Taken in the Fall of 2015

 

 

 

 

 

Browntown Cemetery

Browntown Cemetery

Concession: 9, Lot: 33; 1 mile north of Addison Cemetery Status: Closed to further burials – Twp of Elizabethtown*, GPS: 44.675611, -75.884843

The photos and information were sent to us by E.Seabrooke, many thanks for them.

They reported that this is the only headstone left standing in the cemetery plot.

 

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Entrance to the Cemetery Photo 2016
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Only tombstone left standing in the cemetery photo 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The tombstone reads; ” In memory of Sarah E., daughter of Wm. & Abigail Brown who died June 10, 1852 age 11 months; Hiram, Son of Wm & Abigail Brown died Feb 19 1859 age 9 yrs & 7 mo.

 

Browntown – A Forgotten Hamlet in Elizabethtown

Browntown

Few people today have ever heard of Browntown, but 100 to 150 years ago, this village of the Browns was a bustling,

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industrious community, with mills, houses, a black smithy, stores, hard working ambitious people and a fringe of prospering farmers with huge herds of cows.

Prickly ash cover the slopes and only the ubiquitous lilac and ancient apple trees show where once the residences of the Browns stood.

Once lordly Brown’s Creek, which had enough power to run a sawmill and a carding mill and was deep enough to drown a man, is reduced to a trickle, at points only a couple of inches wide. The creek, further to the west, expands enough to become today’s Elbe Creek, which flows through Glen Elbe.

Browntown, now completely surrounded by private property, lies a couple of miles east of Addison. It is reached via the Rocksprings Road, branching south off of No. 29 Highway. Half a mile down the road, a lane turning right, down to the Stanley Hall farmhouse, points the way to Browntown.

At the Hall Farmhouse, one must trudge half a mile through waist-deep grass and shoulder high weeds to reach Brown’s Creek. Browntown once sprawled up and down the creek, and high on a knoll to the south, rests the old Browntown Cemetery.

Browntown was a thriving community in the horse and buggy days. It had its own road, part of which consisted of the granite rocks of the Pre-Cambrian shield. Flat sections of the rock which formed this road, still exist on the higher ground.

The road itself has long been cut off by fences. Overgrown with brush, its route can still be traced through the fields but no wagon has raised the dust of its ancient ruts for 70 years or more.

The only traces of the buildings which once formed Browntown, are a few rotting timbers in what was presumably the basement of a dwelling, and the sagging cover of an old well. Not even the foundations can be found.

Maps made in 1861 show a number of buildings there, including at least three Brown dwellings.

Browntown Cemetery lies in the middle of Andras Adolf’s pasture. A rusting wire fence surrounds the small enclosure, and entry is made via an iron gate hanging on squeaking hinges. The fence keeps the cattle out, but the elements have sadly battered the headstones. Only four stones remain standing. The others lie in fragments on the graves. Genealogists of the Leeds and Grenville branch of the Ontario Genealogy Society have painstakingly pieced the stones together to record the graves for posterity, but some stones are broken and lie beneath the surface.

Founder of Browntown was United Empire Loyalist Nathaniel Brown, a British soldier who fought under General Burgoyne in the 1777 battles of Saratoga and Tinconderoga. At the end of the war, Brown and his family made their way from Bennington, VT. to Canada. For his services, Brown was granted 200 acres of land and he chose the wilderness area of Elizabethtown, 15 miles north of Brockville. His farm became the nucleus of the future community of Browntown.

Born in 1850, Brown was in his 50th year when he settled here in 1800. Nathaniel and his wife Mary, had nine children. They were James, born Oct 22,1779 and died March 12, 1859; Nancy (1780-1855) who married Jonathon Fulford, ancestor of the Fulford family of Brockville; Samuel; Michael; Anna; Philip, who married Polly Parish the daughter of Farmersville pioneer William Parish UE; Hanna; Nathaniel Jr. and Phoebe.

Nathaniel’s property was described as Lot 35 in the Ninth Concession of Elizabethtown. His son James subsequently developed the adjoining Lot 34 as well as Lot 35 in the Seventh Concession. In 1837, Nathaniel’s property passed to James. (Recorder and Times c1980, Darling Scrapbook 3 p31)

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Lorren Brown and his 1st wife Edith Miner c1880’s
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(l-r) Bertha Amella Brown, Lorren Brown and son Charlie, the last of the Browns

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Entrance to Browntown Cemetery c1980
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Nona Ashley and grave of Sarah Brown c1980

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Lorren Brown’s old homestead near Addison c1980

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Jack knife made at the Browntown Blacksmith Shop photo by W.Blanchard
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Jack Knife made at the Browntown Blacksmith Shop Photo by W.Blanchard

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Entrance to Browntown Cemetery photo by E.Seabrooke taken 2016
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Only Tombstone left standing in the Cemetery Photo by E.Seabrooke taken 2016 age 9 yrs & 7 mo.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Excerpts from:

The Athen’s Reporter from Jan 31, 1889 to Dec 31, 1889

Browntown

Jan 8, 1889

There was quite a commotion in the quiet village of Browntown the other evening, it being the annual ice cream social at the residence of Mr. Franklin Wiltse, composed of the elite of the village and suburbs.

 

Jan 29, 1889

Wood sawing is the order of the day in this section. The McLean Brothers have given Browntown quite a siege. They are up to the mark every time

 

Saturday March 16th,  1889

Mr. A. Church of Browntown, has purchased the celebrated horse, ‘Donnybrook’, from Mr. Albert McVeigh, and intends running Her Majesty’s mail for this season

 

Monday April 8th   1889

On Saturday last the wife of Mr. Lorren Brown, of Browntown, became the mother of a pair of twin girls. Unfortunately one of them died, but the mother and the other one are doing well.

Mr. A. Church, of Browntown, has been engaged for the last few days drilling a well for Mr. George Patterson, of this place. When at the depth of 90 feet a stream was struck sufficient to drive a mill.

The Athens Reporter and County of Leeds Advertiser

Tuesday Dec. 4, 1894 issue-

Glossville– Friday, Nov. 30-

Mr. and Mrs. G. Booth of Browntown are visiting friends in Carleton Place.

St. John the Evangelist Anglican Cemetery

St. John the Evangelist Anglican Cemetery

Concession: 6, Lot: 20; – New Dublin Community Cemetery Board* – Across the road from the New Dublin Cemetery – GPS- 44.667349, -75.800447

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St. John the Evangelist Church at New Dublin
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St. John the Evangelist

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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On the left side of the church
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Behind the church
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Behind the church

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Right side of the church
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Right side behind the church
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Right side of the church
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Right side looking toward the front of the church

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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William Giffin died July 17, 1856 aged 60 years
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William Webster died Sept 30, 1880 aged 83 years
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William McCorkey died Dec 7, 1873 aged 86 yrs, 11 mo, 19 days
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Wal. Bingham Moore died Jun 18, 1871 aged 103 and his wife Francis Moore died May 7,1897 aged 87 yrs
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William Eyre died March 19, 1874
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Moore Tombstone

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Margaret Tackaberry, wife of William McConkey born Jan 31, 1807, died March 12, 1803 – “She died before she was born”
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Mary Warren, wife of William Webster died March 21, 1870 aged 76 yrs
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Mary and William Webster
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Harvey McCokey died Sep 1, 1876 age 8 yrs, 10 mos and 25 days
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Elizabeth wife of Joseph Carley born Feb 12, 1780, died May 8, 1870
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Farrar and Moore tombstones
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Albert Eyre died Feb 3, 1885 aged 29 yrs, 1 mo, 11 days

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Dublin Community Cemetery

New Dublin Community Cemetery

Across from St. John’s Anglican Cemetery, Concession: 6, Lot: 20, New Dublin Community Cemetery Board – GPS 44.666448, -75.800546

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General Views
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General Views
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General Views
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General Views
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General View
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General View

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Kendrick Family Section
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Kendrick Family Section

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sarah Moore died May 4, 1889 aged 14 yrs, 7 mos, 2 days
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Ann Davis wife of Frederick Moore d March 23, 1896
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Ann and Sarah Moore, mother and daughter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Harold and Emma Landon
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William Foxton, died March 4, 1878 age 21 yrs, 6 mos, 1 day
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William Foxton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fulford Pioneer Cemetery

Fulford Pioneer Cemetery

Concession: 1, Lot: 28; Location: at the south end of Fulford Point Road, west of Brockville , established in 1786 – Twp of Elizabethtown*, GPS- 44.541371, -75.750953

Anyone visiting this cemetery should ignore the “No Parking” signs as they are not valid. You will be parking on Township Land and this is allowed.

 

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Cemetery Sign on open gate

 

 

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Laneway going down into the cemetery

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Laneway going down into the cemetery

 

 

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View looking East
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View looking East
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View looking East

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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View looking to the West