Articles

Christmas – 1886

Christmas 1886

By Walter K. Billings

It was Christmas morning about the year 1886. We had been up early to get down to the kitchen where the eight merry-xmas-1908-pcb4p31astockings had been hung the night before. Now we were all in one big bedroom looking at the candy elephants, pigs, sheep and rabbits that were already pretty sticky by repeated lickings from various tongues.

Breakfast was just starting when father came in from the barn to say that a big snow storm was coming from the east and he guessed with the two feet of snow already on the ground it would not be safe to attempt the trip down home, as he always called the old farm house just out of Brockville on the Chemical Road. However, although the storm had started, father decided the team could make the trip. The big sleigh had been in readiness for a couple of days; straw had been placed in the bottom of the big box and some carpet spread over this and the sleigh had been backed into the shed to keep the snow out of it. At last we all piled in and were away. The toll-gate was just east of our farm house and as we drove through, our neighbour came out to wave to us. We always paid our toll by the year so did not have to stop, but cheered and sang “Jingle-Bells” as the horses raced through. Years later in a letter I had from a woman who lived as a girl at the toll-gate she told me how much she had always envied us our trip to Grandfather’s on Christmas Day. We usually met Tom Billings, his brother Horace, and their father and mother, Bruce and Polly, on their way to Aunt Jule McCrady’s house just west of the village. We of course gave them a “Merry Christmas”!

Driving into the yard at Grandfather’s, we were all ready to cry “Christmas Box” to the Johnsons (Aunt Lizzie) and the McLeans (Aunt Ida) whom grandfather had already brought out from Brockville for the day. Such a racket as we always yelled them down and fairly smothered them with hugs and kisses! Then, into the big kitchen we went where on the table was a large bread pan filled with popcorn all salted and sweetened, and on the side table six mince pie that had been brought in from the back porch where we knew a thirty gallon milk can contained many more. These six pies soon would be placed in the oven to be warmed. Beside these pies was a big dish of the loveliest raisins on the stems, dishes of candy, nuts and oranges, that mother had forbidden us to sample. The delicious scent of the big gobbler roasting in the old stove greeted us! My grand-mother had told me it was the one that had chased me out of the yard a couple of weeks before and I did not feel bad that we were to get even with him now.

merry-xmas-pcb4p27cWith about twenty-five to feed, Grandfather got busy, standing at the end of the long table. Grace was said, plates were passed, heaped with mashed potatoes, squash, cranberries and that turkey. It seemed that we children would never be served as plate after plate went by, but at last we were all told to go ahead. I was short and fat and stubby but I am sure no one that day had more to eat, as Grandfather always had an eye on our plates. Poor mother had some trouble watching for fear we took the biggest piece of fruitcake, but when an extra piece fell off in front of me I didn’t put it back.

Then the candy, dates, nuts, oranges and lovely red snow apples came along but by this time we were nearly ready to rest for an hour or two anyway. The big Christmas tree in the parlour all strung with popcorn and ribbons, was a sight and we went in on tip toe to peek at it. Then the doors were thrown open and we were able to sit around on cold haircloth chairs and sofas until our names were called and we went up to get our parcels. I remember on this occasion there were six or seven pairs of lovely leather mittens in sight, and as one or two of them had fur cuffs I wondered which ones were for me. That was a great day. I got a pair of mittens, but one of the cousins got the ones with the fur on them. But they wouldn’t have been big enough for me anyway.

I can remember Grandmother sitting in her rocking chair in the dining room by the box stove which had been stuffed with big sticks of wood. Grandmother aalways wore a little lace cap and a lovely shawl over her shoulders. Aunt Belle hovered over us to see that we were all wrapped up for the trip home. Uncle Bob Johnson had given me a quarter during the afternoon and I kept my hand in my pocket all day for fear I might loose it. I haven’t that quarter now, but I never took care of a twenty-five cent piece as long again.

Well, horrible thought, father was outside and said we had better get ready at once for home as the storm was worse. merry-xmas-pcb4p32aThey wanted us to stay at grandfather’s all night but to find beds for twenty-five of us was impossible. We climbed into the sleigh, the robes were thrown over us as we sat in the bottom of the box, and in five minutes we were all asleep. The horses plunged through the drifts out in the fields, where the roads were blocked, and finally we were awakened at our own door. What a day! What a memory! Children who travel now in motor cars have never had the lovely experience of a trip to Grandfather’s in the sleigh at Christmas time.

This story is taken from the book “How Dear to My Heart” by Walter Kilborn Billings, published in 1954.

Const. Douglas A. Scott, RCMP – Our People, Our Heritage

Const. Douglas Scott

Was killed in the line of duty on Monday, November 5, 2007 in Kinnirut, Nunavut. Douglas Allen Scott was 20 years scott-douglas-rcmp-1of age and the son of Douglas and Maria Scott of Lyn.

He was answering a drunk driving call in Kinnirut a community of about 400 people on Baffin Island. The call that he responded to came in around 10:50 pm He was last heard from at 11:02 pm when he called in to confirm he was following up on the complaint.

Residents said they were devastated by Scott’s murder and held an outdoor vigil Tuesday. The local school where the young mountie dropped in regularly to visit, closed its doors for the day. “You never saw Doug, but always you saw him with a bunch of young kids following him.” said Larry Collins principal of Qaqqalik School.

“Doug was just 20 years old, but already had demonstrated his commitment to the RCMP and to Canada and to the community he willingly served in Nunavut” said Sup. Martin Cheliak, RCMP Commander in the Northern Region.

The 20 year old Mountie grew up west of Lyn with dreams of becoming a police officer like his Uncles and cousins, going on ride alongs and volunteering with the Brockville Police Department. He scored so high on recruiting tests that he was offered an RCMP job one semester short of graduating from the Police Foundations Programme at St. Lawrence College, where his former professor, retired RCMP officer Michael Clarabut, described his former student as a “Shinning star”.

He was born on December 21, 1986 in Brockville to Douglas and Maria Scott. “Dougie” was raised in the Algonquin area before moving to Lyn. He attended Algonquin, Maynard and Lyn public schools, then graduated from Thousand Islands Secondary School before attending St.Lawrence College’s police foundations program at the Brockville Campus.

Recruited by the RCMP, he continued his education at the RCMP Training Academy in Regina, Saskatchewan. On April 23, 2007 Constable Scott proudly attained his lifelong goal to be a police officer, He was assigned to “V” division, where he worked in Iqaluit and finally Kimmirut.

While growing up, he worked for various families in the area, cutting grass and babysitting. Later he worked at Mrs. B’s Variety,  Zellers and Shell Canada. During the summer months he spent many evenings umpiring local softball games. He began his career in law enforcement as a summer student with the OPP Marine Unit.

His Primary interest was spending time with family, friends and his puppy Gauge. He kept in touch with regular telephone calls and e-mails. His other interests included lacrosse, fitness, volunteering, attending community events, playing cards and enjoying outdoor activities. Recently he spent time learning about the culture and landscape of Nunavut. He took part in community festivals, snowmobiling and four wheeling. Most importantly he met people of all ages.

Funeral

A sea of red and blue will descend on Brockville on Tuesday November 13, 2007. It is expected that there will be up scott-douglas-rcmp-3to 3,500 police and RCMP officers alone.

“We’re expecting anywhere between 2,500 and 3,500 police officers” said Brockville’s Deputy Police Chief Adrian Geraghty. “It is a huge undertaking. They’re coming from all over North America”.

The service will be held at Wall Street United Church which has a capacity of 1,000 people, will be held only for Scott’s family and friends and police officers. Another nearby church, First Presbyterian Church will take the overflow of police officers mourners where they will be able to watch a live broadcast of the service.

“This is a Canadian tragedy”, said Leeds-Grenville Tory MP Gord Brown. “My heart goes out to the family, this really hits home. He’s only 20 years old. He’s just a kid, it’s such a tragic loss”.

At the funeral Canon Michael Read said that the senseless tragedy has touched lives in the community, RCMP and all Canadians. “We weep with you” he told Scott’s Family “We have lost a very special person , Our tears mix with yours and rightly so.. We are mourning with you Maria, Doug, Chad and Layne for Dougie and our tears flow”.

Doug Scott’s RCMP Stetson sat on his casket draped with a Canadian Flag at the front of the church next to an RCMPscott-douglas-rcmp-2 portrait of the young constable.

The formal police funeral ended with a song in Scott’s honour called “Hometown Hero” by Brockville band Healy and Orr.

 

 

 

 

 

Lyn Softball Park Dedicated to RCMP Constable Douglas Scott Jr.

Local residents, dignitaries, members of the RCMP and Canadian Army Veteran’s Motorcycle Club turned out to scott-doug-memorial-park-lyn-1honour the late RCMP Constable Douglas Scott Jr. Together they dedicated a softball park and monument to him on Main Street, Lyn on Novebmer 5th, 2010.

Know for his charm, personality and boyish good looks, Doug Scott was well loved in the community of Lyn where he had grown up. He both played and coached softball, giving heart and soul to the game. That same dedication and drive was also devoted to his short lived career as an RCMP Constable.

scott-doug-memorial-park-lyn-2 scott-doug-memorial-park-lyn-4 scott-doug-memorial-park-lyn-3

(Sources for this story were the Brockville Recorder and Times and The St. Lawrence EMC)

The Old Perth Road

The Old Perth Road

The Old Perth Road, which ran north-west from Brockville to Perth, followed a path that is in many ways similar to that of the modern Highway #29. There were, however, some significant differences on its specific path.

Although much of the southern portion of the Perth Trail is lost in the mists of time, having fallen to the development and expansion of Brockville and its environs, it probably started in the west end of town where Perth Street intersects King Street West.

From here, it made its way to what is now the intersection of the Parslow Road and Country Road #27 (Centennial Road). It travelled north along Parslow Road, past Kilkenny Road and onto what is now Rowsome Road. It did not however, immediately curve right at this point, as Rowsome Road does, but continued north to what is now the intersection of Murray Road and Highway #29.

At this point, aside from minor deviations, the course of the Old Perth Road and the modern Highway #29 follow each other, up trough Spring Valley, Glen Buell, Forthton and Addison, finally passing beyond the boundaries of Elizabethtown Township and continuing to Smith’s Falls and then Perth.

The Old Perth Road was an important factor in the development of Elizabethtown, and places further north. Much of the early development in the township focuses on the route surrounding the old road. In addition to making settlement easier, the trail was used by many travellers, thus causing the rise of many fine inns that survive as homes to this day near Spring Valley, as well as those that have not survived in Tincap and Forthton.

The Old Perth Road also served in the defence of Upper Canada, seeing use as a supply route for British soldiers during the War of 1812.

There was at one time between Athens and Brockville as many as 13 inns. Some were large and clean offering good food and sleeping accommodations. The one mentioned by a Rev. Bell in about 1813 was of the other sort. He had been visiting with Rev. Smart in Brockville and had obtained a lift with a member of the congregation to about 11 miles north of Brockville on the Perth Road. He overnighted with a farmer and set out the following morning before dawn for Perth. Shortly, be came upon an Inn, and decided to stop for breakfast. It was a small log building, huddled close to the earth and possessing a dirty interior. The landlady sat with some farmhands at the only table, and at hearing his request, bade him to get outside and wait for her to finish eating. After a delay of some time, some spoiled mutton and fried bread was literally dropped in his lap as he sat at a crude bench in the outdoors. The rest of his trip was through heavy woods, navigating along blazed trails until he arrived at Rideau Ferry and then on to Perth.

(excerpts from “Highway #29- The Old Perth road, A look at the history and homes” by Michael Brown and Heritage Elizabethtown)

elizabethtown-master-western-part
Route of the Old Perth Road on a map of 1861-62
elizabethtown-master-1861-62-map-4
Route of the old Perth Road on a map of 1861-62

 

 

 

Bellamy’s & Clark’s Crossing – Forgotten Hamlets in Elizabethtown

Bellamy’s & Clark’s Crossing

Are these two places forgotten hamlets or just names of railroad crossings on a map ? We have been unable to find out any information on either place.

As the map shows Bellamys did have a station on the Brockville and Ottawa Railway, Clark’s Crossing did not. The only information we could find was this one line comment from Edna’s Scrapbook:

A well know resident William Lamb aged 55 years, was killed by a train at Clark’s Crossing on August 24, 1865.

Excerpts from:

The Athen’s Reporter from Jan 31, 1889 to Dec 31, 1889

Clark’s Crossing

Jan 8, 1889

Miss. Viola Wiltse is spending a few days with friends at Clark’s Crossing.

 

If anyone has information regarding these two locations we would appreciate hearing from you.

 

elizabethtown-master-1861-62-map-6
Clarks Crossing on map of 1861-62
elizabethtown-master-1861-62-map-2
Bellamys on a map of 1861-62

Toledo – A Village in Kitley

Toledo

kitley-master-1861-62-map-1
Toledo on a map from 1861-62

There was a time when this fine old Kitley Village was known simply as Bellamy Mills, due to its proximity to the mills operated by Chauncey Bellamy on Bellamy Lake west of the village.

The actual survey of Kitley was delayed for seven years until 1797. In the meantime, Kitley had its first settler, a pioneer farmer named James Finch. With his family James Finch settled on what was later to become Lot No. 29 in the 7th Concession. Finch mistakenly started a homestead on a clergy reserve Lot No. 22 on which he began to clear five acres of land. When he realized his mistake he moved and began to clear another 16 acres of land on adjoining lot no.23. He then petitioned the government for the grant of this land. He never received the grant and after rowing with the government of the day for a number of years finally left the area sometime before 1804.

The land James Finch cleared, on which his log cabin stood, lies along what is now Main Street.

Toldeo researchers found that James Finch had been granted 200 acres on Lot No. 22 on May 22, 1801, but Finch sold the property the next year to Hugh McIlmoyl. He sold to Eben Estes the same year. After several more transactions the lot came into possession of Wyatt Chamberlain, the founder of the village.

In 1806 Lot No. 23 was granted to Charles May who sold it in two sections a year later. Other lots which now form the site of Toledo changed hands many times during the early years.

Wyatt Chamberland was born in 1786 in New York State, son of a pioneer Methodist missionary and organizer. Although he didn’t have much schooling, Chamberland was self educated and ambitious. He put himself through Methodist school and qualified as a preacher.

At 28, he was operating a Methodist circuit in New York State and in 1820, came to Canada to become a minister in Prince Edward County around Picton. Later he moved to the Augusta circuit but was stricken with an illness in 1828 forcing him out of the ministry.

Chamberland came to Kitley in 1832 and began by buying up land in this area, then known as Kitley Corners. As be bought each lot, Chamberland broke it up into village lots and sold them, thus laying the groundwork for the future village of Toledo.

He called the settlement Camberlain’s Corners. He opened the first store in a log cabin.

Chamberland also built the first frame dwelling in the area. He was the first postmaster and became a justice of the peace. His first wife was Catherine Halleck, daughter of pioneer missionary Rev. William Halleck, for whom Halleck’s Road west of Brockville was named.

Chamberland’s Corners became officially Toledo in 1856. The village was named after Toledo in Spain, scene of a British victory over a French army in the Spanish Campaign of 1813.

Both lots lie along the road which became the main street of Toledo. Finch erected a log cabin and dug a well. He cleared 16 acres on lot no. 21, but his claim to the land was disputed by the government.

The Kitley census of 1800 lists Finch as a settler, but he is missing from the count in 1804. Historians believe that he got fed up with government delays in approving his claim and left the area in disgust.

dscf6707
Roadside sign – photo 2016

Main Street in Toledo was then a continuation of the Old Perth Road, which cut through the village and headed north to Lombardy over Rideau Ferry and on into Perth.

Including the Livingstons, Finch and Chamberlain early settlers were Hugh McKnoyl, Ben Estse, Ephraim Koyl, David Allen, John Kincaid, Billy Brown, Charlie May, David Kilborn, The Tolman and Robinson families as well as the Cole, Coad and Code families.

 

 

 

Religion

From earliest times, religion has played a major role in the lives of Toledo folk. And the fine churches which call the faithful to worship every Sunday testify to the status of the church in the area’s history.

A fine example of early 20th century architecture is St. Philip Neri Church in the centre of the village. Named for an Italian priest St. Philip (Filippo) Neri who lived from 1515 to 1595, the parish was established in 1833.

In 1833 Bishop Alexander MacDonald (named Bishop of Upper Canada in 1820) appointed Father Campion of Prescott to administer the Parish of Kitley. Focal point for the parish, which then covered Kitley, Bastard, South Burgess and South Crosby townships was the east shore of Bellamy’s Lake just west of Toledo.

Today two old cemeteries bearing headstones with names such as Coughlin, Donovan, McDonald mark the site. Father Campion held mass four times a year in a farmhouse which stood near the modern Bellamy’s Lake Park. Records of St. Philip Neri indicate 25 to 30 persons attended the services.

In 1837 Father Clarke Prescott was assigned to Toledo and three years later supervised the building of a wooden church on the shore of Bellamy’s Lake. Father O’Reilly came from Brockville in 1840 to take charge. He settled in a farmhouse three miles south of the church. In 1860 Rev. Michael Lynch took up residence near the church in a house built for him. In the same year Father Lynch supervised the building of a stone church at Philipsville.

Father Lynch was succeeded by Rev. William McDonagh but left in 1861 and until 1873, neither Kitley nor Phillipsville had a resident pastor. The parish was administered from Smith’s Falls and Westport. In 1873 Rev. William Kielty became a pastor of Kitley and Phillipsville.

By 1885 the old church had reached such a state of disrepair that it was considered advisable to abandon it and put up a new chapel in Toledo. Property was bequeathed to the parish in 1887 from the estate of Martin Breen and by 1896 the present rectory was built as well as the stone chapel. In 1899 Phillipsville left the parish to join Elgin.

By 1905 the growing congregation required a new church which was completed in 1907. The chapel built in 1896 was added to the new church as a sacristy. The first mass was held at Christmas 1907, and the following year the church was dedicated to St. Philip Neri.

dscf6693
St. Philip Neri Catholic Church – photo 2016
dscf6691
St. Philip Neri Catholic Church – photo 2016
episcopal-methodist-church-2
Episcopal-Methodist Church – photo 2016
episcopal-methodist-church-1
Episcopal Methodist Church 1877 – photo 2016
dscf6676
St. Andrew’s United Church – photo 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

dscf6677
St. Andrew’s United Church – photo 2016

 

The Tinsmith of Toledo

On Toledo’s Main Street the access road leading south to hook up with Hwy 29, stands a weather beaten two story frame structure which for 60 years was the home of a prosperous but tiny smithy business.

This building was built in 1880 by a South Crosby tinsmith, Tom Singleton  and became known as the Singleton smithy.

Tom Singleton came from South Crosby in 1880 and bought Lot No.32 on Main Street. Here he built his smithy and a residence for his family.

One usually associates tinsmiths with the work of turning out tin for roofing and manufacturing duct-work for furnaces, but Singleton went far beyond these items.

He made sap buckets for the maple syrup trade, tins for the syrup, kettles, teapots, wash tubs, milk cans, baking pans and kitchen utensils, weather vanes and storing tanks.

Singleton could also install heavier articles he made and he was an expert repairman. Many a farm wife brought him leaking pans, kettles or other damaged articles and he repaired them good as new.

toledo-tom-singletons-tinsmithy-c1985
Tom Singleton’s Tin smithy – photo c1985

Singleton laboured in his shop for 60 years, retiring in 1940.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From Thad. Leavitt’s book The History of Leeds and Grenville from 1749 to 1879, published in 1879

N.H.Beecher – Mr. Beecher was born in the state of New York in 1839. When seventeen years of age he came to n-h-beecherCanada, entering the employment of Robert Fitzsimmons, Esq., with whom he acquired a through knowledge of the grocery business. In 1863, he opened a general store in Toledo, where he has since resided. Taking a deep interest in public affairs, Mr. Beecher entered the Municipal Council, serving seven years, five of which he has been chosen as Deputy Reeve. His course in the Counties’ Council has been unvarying in direction of economy and retrenchment, coupled with liberality in making grants for improvements absolutely required. At the last general election he was freely spoken of as the Liberal Candidate for the House of Commons, North Leeds. (History of Leeds and Grenville from 1749 to 1879 by Thad. W.H. Leavitt pub. 1879)

 

 

toledo-samuel-edgar-home-leavitt-1879
Samuel Edgar Home – etching from Leavitt’s book of 1879

Samuel Edgar – The subject of this sketch was born in the year 1837, in the Township of Kitley. He is the youngest son of James Edgar, who was born in the year 1791, in the County of Down, Ireland, and emigrated to Canada in the year 1821, settling in the Township of Kitley in 1825, where he resided until his death on the 26th of January 1870. He was among the first settlers of the Township, and one of the oldest Justices of the Peace. He was a member of the municipal council. Mr. Edgar held the office of Lieutenant in the Militia util too old for service, and was also one of the oldest Freemasons in the Counties, having obtained fifteen degrees in the Order. He was the only son of James Edgar, who was born in Montgomery, England.

 

toledo-1861-62-map
Toledo Map from 1861-62
toledo-cenethopah-3
War Memorial for WW II in the centre of Toledo – photo 2016
toledo-cenethopah-2
Toledo War Memorial – photo 2016
toledo-cenethopah-4
Toledo War Memorial – photo 2016
toledo-cenethopah-1
Toledo War Memorial – photo 2016

 

Struthers of Toledo

You don’t have to be all that old to remember “Struther’s of Toledo” perhaps you or your parents have one or two toledo-garns-barn-c1985items in your home that were purchased there. Here is the story behind that store.

Around Toledo folks say that Garnet Struthers electrified the district, but Struthers prefers to think that eggs did the trick.

Ontario Hydro put in electrification in 1940-45, Garnet sold the electrical appliances to the farmers but the farmers built up the Struthers businesses by trading eggs for groceries..

“Every farmer for miles around paid his grocery bill in eggs” said Struthers, recalling the days when his business was confined to a general store on the main street of the village. “We had eggs by the dozen stored in the basement. We couldn’t sell ‘em, so we had to take them by the truckload to an egg grading station to get our money. The money we got from those eggs allowed us to expand. We bought electrical appliances and re-sold them. First it was washing machines. We put a washing machine in every farmhouse in the district. Then it was refrigerators. We put refrigerators in every farmhouse. Then came television sets and electrical milking machines. We put milking machines in every barn, and it all came from the eggs!”

In the late 1940’s, Garnet Struthers and his wife, Lila took over the general store formerly operated by Bert Woods at the crossroads in the centre of the village. Since the early 1900’s, Woods had been a grocer in a century old business on the site and on the death of his daughter, Vivian Hill, took over.

“It was a combination phone exchange, post office and grocery store when we took over” said Struthers. The Kitley Telephone Company exchange was in one corner of he store, and the post office was in the other.”

Mrs. Struthers’ father the late Ross Slater Kilborn, had operated the business after Mrs. Hill left. In 1942 a disastrous fire hit that street and the Bert Carley grocery store was burned out.

Carley rented the former Woods store from the Kilborns for a year and a half until his new grocery store was constructed. Then Garnet and Lila moved in.

“We had $1000. in stock and a $2,000. dollar mortgage” recalled Garnet. “But we had something of everything. We had groceries, hardware, feed, clothing, dry goods, you name it, we had it! Then we added appliances, machinery and roofing and building supplies. Hydro came along and we went into the appliance field. We added electric stoves, then got into the plumbing and electric trade, putting in wiring and selling supplies.”

In 1956, Struthers got an offer for the store he couldn’t refuse. It put him permanently out of the grocery business and led to the establishment of a furniture and appliance store.

“The Seaway was being built and some of the little villages east of here were being swallowed up. George Lapierre, from Mille Roche, near Cornwall, was one of the businessmen forced to move. I understand Lapierre and friends came up here looking for a place to locate. They spotted the old store and decided to take a look at it.

It was on a holiday and I was in Charleston taking in a regatta. They looked in the windows and apparently liked what they saw. At any rate they came down to Charleston Lake, met me at 4pm and made me an offer. I agreed to meet them at 7 pm at the store. We met and at 10pm we had a deal.”

Lapierre took over but soon after suffered a heart attack which curtailed his activities. He later died from a series of heart attacks, but the business carried on under the name of Barr’s General Store.

“We sold Lapierre the rights to the grocery business, clothing and other general items, but we retained the rights to electrical appliances, televisions, plumbing and electrical supplies.” Said Struthers. “That gave us the opportunity of opening up a new business.”

On the road leading south of Toledo stood the long abandoned Baptist Church, erected about 1840. Struthers bought the old church and renovated it to become a store, the first Struthers Furniture Store. The business flourished and in the succeeding years, Garnet and Lila built their new home south of the store.

toledo-struthers-dwayne-l-and-garnet-r
Dwayne Struthers (L) and Garnet Struthers (R) photo c 1985

Disaster struck on June 23, 1961. A freak and rare tornado ripped through Toledo, tearing the roof off the Struthers store and causing thousands of dollars in damage. Struthers vividly remembers the storm.

“It hit just about 4pm and cleaned the roof off the old church building. It blew the roof clear off the property and into Roy Gardiner’s farm field.” Said Struthers. “Harry Lewis, my bookkeeper, was working in the store. There was a huge oak tree in front of the store. The wind pulled it out of the ground, roots and all, and it looked like it was going to fall into what was left of the store, where Henry was, but instead it took a turn to the north and landed off the property.”

“When I went out after the storm, I found rafters from the store sticking in the ground of Gardiners’ field like giant spears buried by some ancient Roman.”

With his building ruined Struthers went to work and the modern Struthers Furniture and Appliance Ltd. Store, an 80 by 80 foot building known popularly as “Struthers of Toledo”. The shell of the old church building was lifted on to rollers and hauled back to the rear of the new store, where it was rebuilt as Garn’s Barn, and was used to sell used furniture.

“Edna’s Scrapbook”

is a paperback book written by Edna B. Chant and was published in 1998. Edna Chant was a reported with the “Athens Reporter” for 23 years and she is the author of four books.

Her book, which is made up of news clippings from various sources, from which we have taken excerpts, gives us a glimpse into life in our area for over a hundred year period ending with stories from 1975.

While her book covers many areas of Leeds and Grenville we have only focused on the area within Elizabethtown-Kitley Township.

Toledo

A 12 year old youth John Dant was murdered near Toledo on Feb 23, 1867

On April 16, 1895, Miss. Stephenson, daughter of the Rector of the Anglican Church at Toledo, aged 18 years, met death in a sad way. She was very found of walking in the woods and about 3pm she went for a walk, but did not return for supper. When she wasn’t home by dark, several men carrying lanterns went to search for her. A heavy rain came up but they could find no trace of the girl. The next morning her body was found lying against a rail fence on the Parker Farm. She was wet and scratched by brambles. An inquest was held and it was ruled that death was caused by exposure, after being lost in the woods.

On April 21, 1895, the funeral of Mrs. George Coad was being held in the Toledo Methodist Church. It was a Sunday afternoon and a large congregation was present. Rev. G.H. Porter was preaching, when shouts and a great commotion could be heard outside. A few men got up and went out, and then the word “Fire” was heard. It was found that Mrs. J. Smith’s home was all on fire. Men, women and children were organized to form a bucket brigade while come carried out furniture. The church was empty, even the minister was at the fire. In spite of their efforts the house was burned. The people returned to the church, the preacher finished the sermon and the pallbearers carried the casket to the cemetery. The men and some of the ladies were soiled, rumpled and wet, but the minister remained dignified and calm throughout.

A subterranean explosion occurred on July 2 and 3rd 1898 at Kitley just off the Perth Road and it has everyone mystified. A reef of rock was blown up along with most of the roadbed. It began on Saturday with a hissing and rumbling noise and culminated on Sunday by an explosion that was heard for many miles. James Taylor lived nearest to the blast and his yard was covered by chunks of rock. Mrs. John Smith was driving up the road and the explosion threw fragments of rock into her buggy. Hundreds of persons have visited the scene including scientists from Ottawa, but no one an explain it.

Samuel Rabb was one of Leeds’ most outstanding citizens. He was born in Ireland, coming to Canada at the age of 20 years, settling at Toldeo. He was a highly regarded school teacher and taught school for 33 years, and then became an Inspector of Schools. He did private tutoring, and was a very fluent speaker. In 1840 he married a daughter of Colonel John Blakely, and they raised ten children, six boys and four girls. Two of his daughters Mary (Mrs. Albert Morris) and Charlotte (Mrs. George Gainford) lived in Athens. Mr. Rabb died at the home of his daughter Charlotte on April 9, 1900 aged 84 years.

While the authorities are trying to decide how to punish the Queen’s Medical Students who robbed a grave at Lansdowne on March 25, 1903, it might be well to consider how to guard the graves of loved ones. The fact that bodies are now bringing a good price on the market should be borne in mind. Students do not hire a livery rig and drive for miles to the cemetery for the fun of it. It is known in one case of their deed of labour extended as far away as Toledo. Many graves are robbed and their relatives never know it. A new grave should be watched every night for a month. After that time the body is not suitable.

Two Toledo sisters died within an hour of each other on January 4, 190. Mrs. William Leacock aged 98 and her sister Ms. Henry Seymour aged 80 were waked at Toledo Presbyterian Church where a double funeral was held.

The cornerstone was laid for St. Philip’s Neri Church at Toledo May 26, 1907

A serious fire occurred in Toledo on March 10, 1908 when the general store of A.N. Coad was destroyed with a large stock of merchandise and $65. in cash, owned by Oscar McDonald. Mr. McDonald went into the store in the morning and started the fires as usual, and then went to his breakfast, when he returned the interior was in flames.

On September 6, 1910, Arnold Boyd of Merrickville was killed while hunting ducks at Mud Lake near Toledo. He and his wife and younger brother set up a tent Friday night, and early Saturday morning he took his boat and gun and set off alone to hunt ducks. When he did not return by dark his wife walked to a farmhouse to see if a search could be made for him. Several men with lanterns went out but could not find him. Early Sunday they went out again and he was found laying half in his boat with part of his head blown off. It is thought he reached for his gun and pulled it toward him by the barrel, and it discharged.

August 6, 1911, Lester Palmer of Toledo was killed when his horse ran away.

On October 4, 1923 the Commercial Hotel at Toledo burned.

On December 17, 1929 fire broke out in the store of C.A.Woods in Toledo and completely destroyed the store as well as the telephone exchange cutting off Toledo, Frankville and Jasper. The operator Miss Grey had a narrow escape. The post office was also in the store. Messengers had to travel by car to Smiths Falls to get help. It was a very bad fire but no one was injured.

The old Commercial Hotel at Toledo was destroyed by fire on October 4, 1923. The fire broke out in the kitchen of the old hotel owned by John McEwen. This is the 4th bad fire in Toledo in less than a year. Firemen from Smiths Falls and Frankville were able to save nearby buildings.

February 2, 1946, George H. Code, 28, accidentally shot and killed at Toledo.

A well known Toledo man, Earl Stafford Drummond was drowned at Seeley’s Bay on October 7, 1951. He was 26.

Clement Coughlin aged 22 years of Toledo was killed in a traffic accident April 23, 1953.

A large barn on the farm of Leonard Laming was burned at Toledo on June 12, 1961. No animals were in the barn but it was full of hay, valued at $2,000. Twenty seven calves grazing near the barn were removed to safety. The fire is doubly tragic as the Laming home was burned on February 5, 1961 with all contents.

Thousands of dollars in damage was done in a matter of minutes when a tornado struck the Village of Toledo on June 23, 1961. About 7pm it started to thunder and rain. Then about 7:30 it became very dark, skies were black as ink and there was a momentary calm. Mothers gathered their children inside and hurried to close doors and windows and were joined by their men folk. There was a general feeling of doom in the air. Then it struck with a roar like and express train, so great as the noise it was impossible for families to converse as their voices could not be heard. When it was all over the following damage had been done: the roof was lifted off Struther’s Store and carried 100 yards away leaving thousands of dollars of appliances and furnishings exposed to the driving rain; a huge oak tree, six feet through at the base, in front of the store was broken off close to the ground and caused great damage to their warehouse; used appliances were blown over and tossed about, a large freezer carried 40 feet away; a truck owned by Garnet Struthers was flipped over on its side; the roof was blown off Ross Kilborn’s workshop; a large tree in the yard of Mildred McClup crashed into Eaton’s Service Station carrying hydro lines with it; three trees in front of the home of Roy Gardiner crashed into their house, ripping off cornice, eaves troughs and the TV aerial; the shop of Lloyd DeWolfe was wrecked as after the roof blew away a large tree fell into the building; Jack Baker’s barn was blown away, pieces being scattered for a mile away; TV aerials were twisted like pretzels; all streets were blocked by fallen trees, nearly every pane of glass in the village was shattered; shrubs, flower beds, gardens were destroyed; the home of Wendell Eaton was struck by lightning and chimneys were knocked off 24 homes. No one was killed or seriously injured. All the next day the scream of chain saws could be heard and Hydro and telephone crews worked for 48 hours. Reeve Charlie Sands was on the scene continuously, lending help and advice.

A large barn owned by Archie Donaldson at Toledo was burned on October 12, 1961. All the season’s crop was lost. Fortunately none of the cattle were near the barn. The cause of the fire is not known.

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Jones and seven children was destroyed by fire at Toledo on October 1, 1962.

Three young men from Toledo area were killed May 26, 1968 in a one car accident, three miles from Toledo, when they crashed into a tree. Dead were the driver William James McCabe, 21 of Jasper, Ivan Botham 18, of Smiths Falls and William Nichols, 15, of Toledo.

On December 17, 1973 Mr. and Mrs. Roy Willows of Toledo were married 60 years. They were married in Elgin and moved to a farm at Toledo where they spent their entire married life. In 1945 their two sons Lloyd and Glen took over the active work on the farm. They had seven children, five daughters and two sons: Irene Bushfield, Mrs. Edna Jarvis, Mrs. Wilma Skakleton, Mrs. Eleanor Drummond and Mary (deceased), Lloyd and Glen. To mark the 60 years of happy married life, Mr. and Mrs. Willows were tendered a reception at St. Andrew’s United Church hall in Toledo.

Shane’s Corners – A Forgotten Hamlet in Kitley

Shane’s Corners

kitley-master-1861-62-map-4
Shane’s Corners as it appears on a map of 1861-62

The area around the community was initially settled by Lowland Scots. Otter and Hutton Creeks passed through the area but these waterways were not large enough to support a mill operation

Shane’s Corners was a small settlement located along Highway 29 near what was the First Concession of Kitley. Shane’s Corners was settled by a man named Lawrence Shane and his wife; Mrs. Shane kept a private school here at one time. The settlement consisted of a few homesteads and very few businesses. [2]

In the 1860’s, the settlement became home to a Temperance Hall, called Mount Albion Temple of the Good Templars Lodge No. 60, I.O.G.T., and located on the first concession. This society continued until 1875.

In the late 1800s, Shane’s Corners had its own cheese factory, Cameron’s Cheese Factory (or perhaps also known as The Glen Elm Cheese Factory [1]) This factory was originally built on a local homestead, however was later moved to the lot across the road from Shane’s School, a more central location. (Wikedepia).

The cheese factory was in operation until 1948 when it was destroyed by fire[1]

In the late 1950’s a 4-H Home-making club was started for boys and girls aged 12 to 16. At this club the young people took up sewing, cooking and crafts. A Shane’s branch of the Women’s Institute was formed in 1962 and had 14 members. The women’s group supported local groups in and around the Shane’s area. [1]

Schools

The settlement was large enough that it was able to become its own school section in the late nineteenth century. The school was known as S.S. #2 Shane’s School, and at the time was located along the boundary of Kitley and South Elmsley townships. [2]

In 1873, school trustees received the deed for a property of land from Henry Shane.

A new stone building was constructed in 1875, replacing an older school further down the road which was subject to arson, possibly committed by a pupil. The schoolhouse was used after hours as the community church, as well as a meeting hall. Well into the 1900s, the building was used by the Shane’s Women’s Institute.

Cemetery

At some point in the 1800s, a cemetery was established here. The cemetery is an Anglican cemetery.

[1]Our Living History, an historical guide to the United Counties of Leeds and Grenville pub 2000

[2] Kitley 1795-1975 by G.J. Lockwood

1998-map-kitley-3
Shanes on a map of 1998
shanes-cors-shane-home-built-in-1860-c1985
Shane Home built in 1860, photo c1985

 

 

 

Newbliss – A Hamlet in Kitley

Newbliss

kitley-master-1861-62-map-4
Newbliss on a map from 1861-62

The village dates back to 1802, when United Empire Loyalists settled on grants of land given them by the Crown.

Rachel and Isaiah Wiley were granted Lot 13 on the 4th Concession and opposite it Lot 13 on the 5th Concession was granted to Catherine Moore in 1805. Two dirt roads crossed at the borders of the two lots and a hamlet was born as more settlers moved in.

Newbliss didn’t start out with that name. Originally it was Dodd’s Corners named after a shoemaker who lived on the corner and his father George Dodd with a family of five lived on another. This was in 1802 and in 1820 it became Dack’s Corners from the family of William Dack. In 1855 the name was finally changed to Newbliss.

The name comes from the Town of Newbliss in Ireland, brought here by an Irish schoolmaster, John Mackay who came to teach in Newbliss in that year. He thought the collection of houses and business deserved a new name and he made the decision stick. Mackay taught in Newbliss for over 20 years before retiring.

Further to the south William Dack bought parts of lots 19 and 20 in the 4th Concession and other acquisitions and became the largest landowner in the area.

He was operating a tavern in the 1830’s but the site is unknown. It was probably located along the road from Brockville which became the Victoria Macadamized Road during the 1840’s and eventually became Hwy 29.

Dack’s Tavern also gave birth to the Orange Order in Kitley. Newbliss Lodge was formed in the tavern in 1835 and around 1850 the order built a hall in Newbliss, which burned in 1944.  Newbliss LOL, No.87 observed its centenary in 1935 . The lodge moved its headquarters in 1949, taking over the former Coad’s school, a stone building erected in 1875, replacing the earlier log cabin school. The school had originally been named for the Dack Family, but adopted the name of Coad in the 1850’s.

Newbliss was once a thriving community of over 600 people, with inns, a cheese factory, several schools, a hotel, stage coach house and other business. There was also an active Orange Lodge and a Temperance Hall.

Lovell’s Gazette of 1873 ascribes 250 persons to the village population. There were two blacksmiths, a dressmaker, and engineer, harness maker, milliner, postmaster, two teachers, shoemaker, tailor, wagon maker, two weavers and 35-40 farmers.

The Gazette listed 600 in the village population, but seven years later another census cut the population to 300. In 1902 the population of the hamlet itself was only 25 persons. Earlier figures were believed to be based on post office addresses.

“The original Newbliss Cheese Factory consisted of three frame buildings, the main factory, a curing house and a boiler room. When the main factory was moved from the old Ross farm to the centre of Newbliss, a frame cheese house was constructed for the cheese maker. It still stands beside the general store.” (Kitley 1795-1975 by Glenn Lockwood)

John Edgar, father of James Edgar, was a staunch Presbyterian, but he ran the first hotel and bar room in Newbilss. In 1862, he gave up the hotel business, leasing the premises to George Stewart.

Edgar then formed a Sons of Temperance lodge and was for many years one of its most prominent leaders.

Newbliss cheese factory, later a general store, was one of the busiest in Leeds County in the middle and later part of the 19th Century. Farmers for miles around brought their milk here for processing. The factory produced cheeses weighting 90 to 100 pounds. Patrons used to haul the cheeses encased in round cheese boxes by wagon to the Jasper railway station, from where they were shipped to the cheese board offices in Brockville for grading and later sale. The factory operated until around 1944 when it was converted into a store.

In 1904 the cheese maker, Robert Beckett, was one of the most prominent men in the village and owner of the first car in Newbliss. For years it was known as “Mr.Beckett’s Buick”

Early School

The former Coad’s school, a stone building, was erected in 1875, replacing the earlier log cabin school. The school had originally been named for the Dack Family, but adopted the name of Coad in the 1850’s.

Dack’s school was built on Lot 17 of Concession four about 1830, a simple log structure with unpainted interior walls and austere benches and desks.

About the same time, Newbliss village had a log school which was replaced in 1874 by a stone structure. Newbliss School was phased out of existence in 1961 with the pupils being transferred to Jasper.

Newbliss had two schoolhouses to serve the community, each its own section. The first school was built around 1830 and was titled S.S. #5 Newbliss School. It is believed the first schoolhouse for S.S. #5 was made of log, however no records of the school exist. In 1858, the stone schoolhouse which replaced the log structure was erected. This schoolhouse is still standing, located at the intersection of Highway 29 and Line Road 4. The other school section in Newbliss was #6, with its school being called S.S. #6 Coad’s School. Originally, Coad’s School was known as Dack’s. This schoolhouse was also constructed of log before being replaced by a stone building in 1870. Upon its closure in the 1940s, Coad’s School was sold to the Orange Lodge. (Kitley 1795-1975 by Glenn Lockwood)

newbliss-school-house-1
Newbliss Schoolhouse photo November 2016
newbliss-school-house-3
Newbliss Schoolhouse – photo taken November 2016
newbliss-school-c1985
Newbliss School House c1985

Religion

As in many areas of Leeds and Grenville, circuit riders first brought religion to Newbliss in the early days.

Ezra Healey, probably the most famous of the early circuit riders, included Newbliss in his itinerary in 1822. He was a Methodist assigned to the Rideau Circuit. In 1818 he had begun conducting services in Toledo in a log school house. Methodist history records the fact he ministered to only four families here, probably meeting at Dack’s log school house.

Methodists worshipped anywhere they could find shelter, a barn being used on more than one occasion but in 1834, the congregation built a log chapel on the eastern edge of Kitley Township in the community known as Crystal and the church subsequently bore the name “Providence Chapel”.

The church was used until church union in 1935 when it was sold to a local resident who in turn donated it in 1960 to Upper Canada Village.

Early Anglicans also held their services at Dack’s School with a minister coming from Smith’s Falls to preach. It was years before the first Anglican Church was built. St. Paul’s Church was erected here in1904.

The village was also the first centre for Presbyterians in Kitley Township. The home of James Edgar, a pioneer inn-keeper, was turned into a mission centre about 1835 and Kitley Presbyterians met there until 1847 when St. Andrew’s Church was constructed in Toledo.

newbliss-church-2
Newbliss Church – photo taken November 2016
newbliss-church-3
Newbliss Church – photo taken November 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

newbliss-general-store-cheese-house-on-right-c1985
General Store, old cheese house on the right c1985
newbliss-edgar-hotel-c1985
Edgar Hotel c1985
newbilss-2
Road sign entering Newbliss
1998-map-kitley-3
Newbliss as shown on a map from 1998

 

 

“Edna’s Scrapbook”

is a paperback book written by Edna B. Chant and was published in 1998. Edna Chant was a reported with the “Athens Reporter” for 23 years and she is the author of four books.

Her book, which is made up of news clippings from various sources, from which we have taken excerpts, gives us a glimpse into life in our area for over a hundred year period ending with stories from 1975.

While her book covers many areas of Leeds and Grenville we have only focused on the area within Elizabethtown-Kitley Township.

Newbliss

While working on the new house of Robert Mackie near Newbliss in August, 1908, a young man Sidney Christie aged 22 of Smiths Falls fell to the ground from a scaffold and was instantly killed.

On February 3, 1928 George Price aged 19 of Newbliss, was found in the stable of his father’s barn with one side of his head smashed in. It was quite apparent that one of the horses had kicked him. He remained unconscious for 36 hours and then he died.

On February 26, 1959 Isaac Lockwood, 73, of Newbliss died of injuries in a car accident.

An 88 year old man, John Andrew Lyons, of Newbliss, was killed on September 11, 1967 on Hwy 29 at Newbliss when a car driven by his wife Bella Lyons, 71, in which he was a passenger, was struck broadside by a car driven by Mrs. A.L. Wells, 21 of Jasper. Mrs. Lyons and Mrs. Wells were both injured.

St. Paul’s Anglican Church Hall at Newbliss was burned by fire on April 21, 1968. Due to the efforts of the firemen, the church was saved.

 

Mott’s Mills – A forgotten Hamlet in Kitley

Mott’s Mills

kitley-master-1861-62-map-2
Mott’s Mills on a map from 1861-62

History has not recorded the early days of Mott’s Mills, but it is known that a homesteader, John Mott, built the first mill near his farm which straddled Hutton Creek, Mott lived in the area around 1820.

The Mott family is mentioned a number of times in Leeds County archives. Ruben Mott lived near Lyn, homesteading 100 acres of land on Lot 18 in the 3rd Concession of Elizabethtown. His patent for the land was dated May 19, 1802.

John Mott probably moved into the area north of Toledo in 1818. He developed his homestead eight miles north of Chauncey Bellamy’s Mills on Bellamy’s Pond, the hamlet later becoming Toledo.

At the time Hutton was a sizeable creek, capable of supplying power for half a dozen mills. Other than giving their name to the community, the Motts apparently did little to develop Mott’s Mills. By 1840, the Motts were gone.

Sam Robinson moved in and took over the grist mill, then erected a shingle mill. Charles Blancher developed a flour mill, and George Blanchard erected a saw mill.

The area was rich in timber, the sawmill and shingle factory operated at full blast until the early 1900’s. Then the timber reserves petered out, and the extensive lumbering in the hills left mile after mile of barren waste, Deprived of its natural sources for replenishment Hutton Creek dwindled to a mere trickle, which a person could easily step across.

Robinson also put up a carding mill, to card wool taken from Mott’s Mills sheep flocks. The saw mill used to handle such large logs that a cabin door was made from one wide plank.

The Robinson family left Mott’s Mills after a son drowned in the mill pond, and Sam Robinson died. There are no Motts or Robinsons left in the area

One by one the mills closed. Some of the buildings were lost to fire, others just collapsed from decay. Now only the foundations remain and they are thickly overgrown with weeds and underbrush.

Motts Mills also had a tavern, a tannery and a school. It was a stagecoach station for travellers taking the stage from Brockville to Bellamy’s Mills, thence north to Lombardy and on to Rideau Ferry and Perth. Country Road No. 1 now roughly follows the Perth Road route of the early 1800’s.

Cameron’s Cheese Factory was started near Mott’s Mills and served the area 40 years before being moved down the Town Line Road between Kitley and South Elmsley Townships. The factory was set up on the Kitley side of the road, about two miles west of Shane’s Corners and the old Shane’s School which still stands there.

In 1900, the road to the factory ran from Mott’s Mills through Careron’s Swamp, past the Cameron homestead and reached the Town Line Road near the Pattermore’s Farm. Subsequently, it was moved to the north side of the road, to Bill South’s homestead in South Elmsley.

Then, Silas Hitchcock bought it from the Camerons and operated the factory until the 1950’s when it finally closed for good.

When Mott’s Mills was established the only grist mill in Kitley was the John Livingston Mill near Frankville.

At one time Mott’s Mills probably boasted 400 people.

Schools

Generations of Mott’s Mills children were educated at the community’s old one room school, which closed around 1950. The original log school was built on Lot 21 of the 3rd Concession of Kitley. It was succeed by a frame building, which in turn was demolished to make room for a stone school built in 1906.

In its heyday, the school accommodated up to 80 pupils. When Mott’s Mills went into decline, the factories closed and the population dropped, thus greatly reducing school enrolment. After the Second World War, the decline was much more noticeable. All schools in the north of Leeds suffered setbacks and many were closed.

Shane’s School enjoyed an upswing in attendance during the 1950’s, when more people moved into the area. Further down the Town Line Road, Blanchard’s School suffered reverses and was closed in 1956. Pupils from Blanchard’s were then transferred to Mott’s Mills.

Pioneer Sam Hough was the original owner of the land on which Mott’s Mills School stood. The Lot no 21 in the 3rd Concession of Kitley was deeded to Hough on December 18, 1803. In 1816, the lot was sold to Sam’s son, Brewin Hough who in turn disposed of it in the following year to Micajah Purdy. It was probably in Purdy’s time that the first school was erected on the lot. George S. Scovil bought the lot in 1833, and that portion on which the school stood was deeded over to the area school board.

Blanchard’s reopened in 1961, operated for two years and closed forever in 1956. Motts Mills School also closed in the early 1960’s. Students from these two schools were then bussed to Jasper Public School.

The old Robinson home built probably 150 years ago still exists today. A modern concrete bridge holds back the waters of Hutton Creek, so that the mill pond which served the mills still exists today.

Below the dam, only a trickle of water tumbles over the rocks. The old rock dams of the days of Mott and Robinson have been swept away by flood waters over the years, and little trace of them can be seen today.

 

motts-mills-robinson-family-homc-c1900
Robinson Family Home c1900
motts-mills-c1985
Road sign c1985
motts-mills-hutton-creek-c1985-1
Hutton Creek c1985
motts-mills-hutton-creek-c1985-2
Hutton Creek c1985
Original Cement Dam at Mott’s Mills Sep 2017
All that’s left of the original dam at Mott’s Mills photo taken Sep. 2017

Looking South over the wetlands- Sep 2017
Looking south over the wetlands at Mott’s Mills Sept 2017
Signage at Mott’s Mills- Sep 2017
Signage at Mott’s Mills- Sep 2017

The Athens Reporter and County of Leeds Advertiser

Excerpts have been taken from this paper referencing the following hamlet for the years 1889, 1894 and 1895

Tuesday June 25, 1895 issue

Last week Mrs. Geo. Nash re-visited Mott’s Mills, where she formerly resided, after an absence of nineteen years.

 

Kinch Street – A Forgotten Hamlet in Kitley

Kinch Street

kitley-master-1861-62-map-4
Kinch Street on a map of 1861-62

The great Irish immigration into Canada in the late 1830’s and early 1840’s brought the first Kinch Family to this old community. They carved a homestead out of the wilderness beside the road that is known as Kinch Street.

Although always prosperous because of the fertility of its’ farms, Kinch Street had no major industries, mills or factories in its past.

Grist mills and sawmills flourished on Irish Creek near Jasper, and on Slab Street to the southeast, or at Toledo to the southwest, but Kinch Street did not develop these standbys of pioneer days.

Dairy farmers along the street produced great quantities of milk, which was processed into cheese at the Newbliss factory two miles west of this community. When the Newbliss factory closed in the 1940’s, the local milk was shipped to a cheese factory at Easton’s Corners, until it too disappeared in the 1950’s.

Ernie Dack bought out the Newbliss factory and moved to Easton’s Corners. He made cheese for over 40 years until he was killed when his car was hit by a train in Ottawa.

The first homes on Kinch Street were made of logs. In the period 1880 to 1900 a number of Victorian style homes were built with high ceillinged rooms and lots of cellar space. Rooms downstairs had ceilings 10 feet above the floor, upstairs they ran to eight or nine feet high. Following 1900, red brick homes were built by Edward Kinch. Edward Kinch used bricks from the demolished home of pioneer Hiram Buker to erect a house in 1920. One of the first brick homes in the area was built in 1870 by Edward Kinch.

First School

The first log school house here was built in the early 1840’s on the west corner of the farm of pioneer Isaac Foster. Known as S.S. #8, the log school  burned down a few years after it was built.

The community replaced it with a wooden frame structure sheeted in galvanized iron and painted white. For around 100 years it educated generations of Kinch Street children, until it was phased out by the school consolidation in the 1950’s.

This school stood on Lot 9 of the 6th Concession of Kitley. The teacher in 1876 was John Mackay, a veteran educationalist who taught in Newbliss for 20 years before coming to this school.

School trustees in 1876 were Isaac Foster who had donated the plot on which the school stood, James Love and James Morrissey, who was also the boards sectary treasurer. A Dr. Kinney was the school inspector.

 

Ezra Kinch and Family

 

kinch-st-kinch-family-taken-in-1909-2
Ezra Kinch and his wife, Sarah Ann photo from 1909

Ezra Kinch and his wife, Sarah Ann, descendants of pioneers who settled Grenville county around 1840, posed with their family in 1909 for this photo. In front is Lauretta, who married Wes Chant of Toledo; second row, left to right, Maud who wed Bob Lucas, was widowed and married Thomas Ferguson; Mrs. Sarah Ann (Wright) Kinch, mother of the family; William J. Kinch 7, Ezra, father of the family; Mary Jane, though her birth certificate said “Mary Louise”, who married Albert Ferguson of Jasper; rear row, Myrtle, who died at the age of 16; Eliza Ann, who wed a man named Ready in Jasper; Florence May who wed \|Harry Wood, of RR#2, Jasper; Kathy Loyola who married William H. Bell for many years reeve of Kitley and Warden of the United Counties; and Gertrude Estella, who married Alex Morrison, of Morrison Road, south Kinch Street.

 

kinch-st-william-j-kinch-plowing-c1930
J. Knch at the plow c1930
kinch-st-ezra-and-sarah-ann-kinch-c1920
Ezra and Sarah Ann Kinch c1920
kinch-st-edward-kinch-c1900
Edward Kinch c1910

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

kinch-st-c1985
Looking down Kinch Street c1985
1998-map-kitley-2
Kinch Street on map of 1998

 

 

 

 

Lehigh Corners – A Hamlet in Kitley

Lehigh Corners  (Kilborn Corners)

kitley-master-1861-62-map-1
Area of Lehigh Corners on map of 1861-62

This community is situated on the southern fringe of Frankville, straddling No.29 Highway. In the late 1800’s a toll gate was operated here on the old Victoria Macadamized road running between Brockville and Smith’s Falls.

The original settler was Gideon Leehy, somewhere around 1800. The spelling of the family name was changed to “Lehigh’ by Gideon’s grand-daughter.

The original homestead was split by No.29 Highway when it was constructed as a macadamized road in 1852. The highway from Brockville to Smiths Falls was known as the Victoria Macadamized Road in honour of Queen Victoria. It became No. 29 when absorbed into the provincial road system in 1927.

The first crude road through the Leigh’s- Frankville area ran half a mile east of the modern highway. A rough dirt road muddy in the spring and fall, connected this route with Lehigh’s.

Farmers in this area sent their milk to the Frankville Cheese Factory, a mile or so up the road.

The original Lehigh family home burned in 1866, and Lyman Brown, who had married one of the Lehigh girls, rebuilt the house.

Charles Lehigh earned a reputation as a fiddler, playing at many of the social events in this area in the later part of the 19th Century. He was also known as a fine trapper.

Around 1850 Levi Kilborn ran a general store in one half of his house located on Hwy 29 about a mile or so north from Lehigh’s Corners. He was the father of two of Lehigh’s best known sons, Dr. Roland Kilborn who was Toledo’s physician for many years and Dr. Omar Kilborn, a Canadian missionary serving in China for many years.

James Hewitt ran a black smithy in the corners around 1878, and around 1900 Lawrence Davidson set up another smithy. Hewitt and a carriage maker Ben Stewart, supplied farmers with carriages, harness and wagon wheels for many years.

With the coming of the car, service stations made their appearance; a familiar station was Charlie Sands’ establishment on the northeast corner of Leigh Corners. Sands also served for a number of years as Reeve of Kitley.

First School

Gideon Leehy believed in educating the youngsters, so he put up a log school on the south side of Kitley’s Ninth Concession Road, sometime before 1820.

The school lasted until 1851, when it burned down. By this time a number of other families had moved in and a small community was flourishing.

The good burghers elected to build a stone school, which was completed in 1852. For 109 years it served the area well, standing sturdy and sound on the north side of the road, opposite the charred remains of the old school.

lehigh-school-c1985
Lehigh School c1985

In 1961, the school was phased out of the system and replaced by the modern Frankville School on Hwy. 29.

Old school records show that in 1872, R.W.Hornick was the teacher of the one room school. In 1882 the school’s budget was $200., rising to $230 the next year.

Malcome Lehigh was teaching there in 1887 and in 1896 the muster showed six Leigh children attending: Maude, Mertle, Edna, Carrie, Everett and Ernie Lehigh. The last teacher when the final class was dismissd in 1961 was Aileen Montgomery.

Lehigh’s Cemetery

One of Kitley’s oldest burying grounds; Lehigh’s Cemetery is located on the south side of Kitley’s 9th Concession Road about a mile west of Highway 29.

The exact age of the cemetery is unknown but it is probably that burials were being made there between 1800 and 1810.

The land came from part of the 500 acre homestead of Gideon and Clarissa Leehy. The Lehigh burial plot is in the extreme southeast corner of the old burying ground. Here lie Gideon and his wife the former Clarissa Kilborn and the seven members of their family.

A number of Lehigh’s Corners pioneers also rest here. The names on the headstones read like a “Who’s Who of Frankville and district. One plot holds members of the Arnold Family, among them John D Arnold of Brockville who died July 6, 1892 at the age of 76. Also resting in the cemetery are John Soper (1818-1890) his wife Sarah Bennett (1852-1906).

One of Kitley’s outstanding citizens of the 20 Century Hiram McCrae lies in this cemetery. Hiram was born in Montague Township July 2 1807 son of United Empire Loyalist Edward McCrae originally of Albany, NY. Joining the Leeds Militia, McCrae rose to the rank of Colonel. He settled in Kitley in 1837 at the age of 30 and became deeply involved in municipal affairs. Appointed a magistrate in 1853 he served in that position for 35 years until his death in 1888. He was also elected Reeve of the township in 1858, He was Warden of the United Counties three times in 1864, 1867 and 1873.

1998-map-kitley-3
Lehigh Corners on map of 1998
lehigh-cemetery-c1985-3
Road Sign

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

lehigh-cemetery-2
Lehigh Cemetery photo 2016
lehigh-cemetery-6
Lehigh Cemetery photo 2016
lehigh-original-lehihg-home-c1985
Original Lehigh Home c1985
lehigh-rd-log-home-1
Old log home on Lehigh Road East photo 201
lehigh-corners-c1985
Lehigh Corners c1985

 

 

Jasper – A Hamlet in Kitley

Jasper   ( Irish Creek, Olmsted’s Mills)

kitley-master-1861-62-map-5
Map of 1861-62 shows Irish Creek sitting on the border with Wolford Township

Jasper lies in the North East section of Kitley along the boundary with Wolford Township, with Irish Creek running through the village.

Joseph Haskins, the first miler in these parts, settled on the future site of Jasper in 1802. At that time, Irish Lake was a muddy swamp (Mud Lake) or marsh, drained by Irish Creek which turned into the Rideau River north of Haskins’ Mill.

Haskins dammed the creek near his homestead then used the dam water to run a grist mill he erected. A sawmill followed and pretty soon a hamlet grew up around the homestead.

Damning of the creek backed up water to form a lake where the marsh land had existed. The name Irish Lake was given to this body of water.

Haskins’ dam created such a body of water that when Col. John By’s surveyors were laying out the route of the proposed Rideau Canal in 1925 they seriously considered running the new waterway down Irish Creek, through Irish Lake and thence westward to Bellamy’s Mills, now Toledo. However the prospect of having to cut through high ground west from Toledo deterred the surveyors and further tests on Irish Lake indicated some six feet of mud would have to be excavated over the entire length of the lake to make a channel feasible.

The Irish Creek – Irish Lake idea was abandoned and the surveyors laid out the canal route past the estuary of Irish Creek on to Smith’s Falls, eventually cresting the height of land at Newboro and then going downhill along the Cataraqui River to Kingston.

In the 1820’s, Irish, English and Scottish settlers flooded into Kitley, helped by free passage over the Atlantic guaranteed by the government and an offer of 100 acres of free land per family.

Many Irish settlers took up homesteads in the area lying east of the present No. 29 highway, along a shallow pond which still today is called Irish Lake. At the north end of the lake, a settlement called Irish Creek grew up. Today it is the modern village of Jasper.

The new settlers also farmed the area east of Frankville known as Crystal. The community boasts one of the earliest Loyal Orange Order Lodges, No.8.

In 1806 a Mr. Haskins built a grist mill in the tiny settlement then called Albune. In 1820 Gideon Olmstead bought the mill, and the community became known as Olmstead’s Mills.

In 1830, construction of the Rideau Canal raised the water level in Irish Cr. and destroyed the waterfall, which had supplied power for the mill.

That closed the mill but allowed Irish Cr. to be used for rafting timber.

When the Brockville and Ottawa Railway was built from Brockville to Smiths Falls in 1859, railway officials complained that the name Irish Creek sounded ‘petty.’

They urged residents to come up with another name. In 1864 the post office was renamed Jasper, the name chosen by residents from a list provided by the post office.

A fire in 1938 wiped out one corner of the main business area of this village and from the ashes rose a hotel and general store and post office.

The Jasper Hotel stands on the site of the Fitzgerald Hotel, a famous hostelry dating back to the days when the settlement was called “Irish Creek”. Thomas Fitzgerald was running the hotel back in the 1870’s and then Jasper boasted two other hotels.

Churches

jasper-united-church
Methodist Church is located in Wolford Township, Photo c1985
jasper-methodist-church-2
Methodist Church photo 2016

Jasper United Church was built in 1877 as a Methodist house of worship. The old red brick building with its tall silver prier is a focal point for the faithful of this village

 

 

 

 

 

 

Irish Creek

In 1815 Irish Creek was described as being 60 feet across, today it is more like 200 feet. It no longer caries the river traffic associated with the early mills which dotted its banks more than a century ago. Lying south of this village, Irish Lake, also figured prominently in the development of the area.

Irish Lake from which Irish Creek springs is a body of water five miles long, a mile across at its broadest, lying south and east of Toldeo. The lakes headwaters originate in the area west of Hwy No.29 between Plum Hollow and Frankville.

The lake roughly follows a southwest- northeast line east of Hwy No. 29, passing Newbliss Its outlet Irish Creek meanders through a peaceful farming country, through Jasper and emptying into the Rideau River at historic Polley’s Point.

From time immemorial Irish Lake and Irish Creek and their adjoining marshes have been a mecca for hunters.

In the early 1800,s muzzle loading muskets were used by settlers during the annual fall migrations of ducks. The birds were taken for immediate food, or for preserving and use during the long winter months.

One of the area’s earliest hunters was Roger Stevens and he was the districts first duck hunting causality. Stevens a pioneer mill owner in Wolford and Montague townships drowned on a creek emptying into the Rideau in 1795.

Stevens was hunting ducks at the time. He apparently stood up in his boat to fire at a passing mallard, and the recoil of the old hammer triggered shotgun, knocked him out of the boat into the ice cold water.

To this day, the stream bears his name, though some geographers have misspelled it “Stephens”. Roger Stevens was a brother of Able Stevens, first settler at Delta and Philipsville, and the man who brought the Baptist Church to north Leeds.

In 1818 Kitley had 300 residents, most living along the creek and in the Toledo area. In addition to Haskin’s Mill, a grist mill was operated by Richard Olmsted (or Olmstead) and Able Kilborn had grist mills and saw mills south of Irish Lake. He also had mills on Bellamy’s Lake west of Toledo.

In 1829 there were 801 persons living in Kitley and the following year 96 families were living north of Irish Lake and 86 south.

Around Olmsted’s mills on Irish Creek a small settlement grew up, originally called Irish Creek, later Olmsted’s Mills, still later Jasper. That is how the modern hamlet of Jasper came into being.

The hamlet received its greatest boost in 1858 when the Brockville to Carleton Place (later to Ottawa) railway was developed. Though Olmsted’s mills had been idle for 30 years, the hamlet was thriving.

Legend says that the first railway engine to use the line north of Jasper was brought by scow down Irish Lake and Irish creek from the railway line being inched north from Brockville. The two sections joined here.

Martin Doyle was the first station master. At that time there was a store operated by G.Cross, a hotel run by J. McLeod, a school house and five houses.

Ambrose Olmstead had a 100 acre spread here in 1854 and in 1862, he hired John Burchill, a surveyor to lay out a village which he was going to call “Albune”. The village was laid out in 12 blocks, with 95 lots available. For streets he had the following names: Queen’s Highway, Centre, Maple, John, Main and William. Though the plot plan was approved May 31, 1862, the lots were not registered at the Grenville registry office until 1888.

The name ‘Albune’ never caught on and the railway settled the issue by calling the station ‘Jasper’.

Because Jasper became a focal point for produce of all kinds, the railway erected extensive freight sheds, with facilities for handling dressed pork, mutton, butter, wool, clothing, flour and grain.

The Dominion Gazetteer of 1873 listed 750 people in Jasper, but most historians believe that the figure was greatly exaggerated. The following business were also listed: W.S.Cameron, store; W.A.Chester, milliner and dressmaker; Albert Clark Blacksmith; Thomas Fitzgerald, hotel; Tom Huffman, tinsmith; John Mrquette; Mrs. Ambrose Olmstead, grocery; W.S.Ralph, store; Chris Richards, store; Amos Robinson, hotel; Levi Soper, blacksmith; W.H.Sparham. stationmaster.

The railway provided area farmers with a ready flow of cash, since engines burned cordwood by the load. The wood was cut into four foot lengths to fit into the engine fire-boxes. The wood was stacked in sheds along the tracks and every spring an official scaler would come along and measure the wood for size and pay the farmers.

The first station burned in 1871 and was replaced.

Excerpts from the “History of Leeds and Grenville from 1749 to 1879”

by Thad. W.H.Leavitt pub 1879

M.E.Church, Jasper

jassper-methodist-ch-leavitt-1879
Etching of the Methodist Church published in Leavitt’s History Book of 1879

This church is substantially built of brick; it is 30×46 feet, with a tower 14 feet square surmounted by a spire. The charge includes four congregations, viz., Jasper, Easton’s, Kilmarnock and Roseville, the total membership being 190. The trustees of the church are Thomas Edmunds, James Edmunds, Levius Brown, William Cross and B. Warren, the pastor (1878) being the Rev. Eli Woodcock.

 

 

 

jasper-irish-creek-antique-store-c1985
Irish Creek Antique Store c1985
jasper-hotel-c1985
Jasper Hotel c1985
jasper-hotel-5
Jasper Hotel photo November 2016
jasper-school-house-3
Jasper School House

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

jasper-hotel-1
Jasper Hotel photo November 2016
1998-map-kitley-2
Jasper as it appears on a map from 1998

 

Edna’s Scrapbook”

is a paperback book written by Edna B. Chant and was published in 1998. Edna Chant was a reported with the “Athens Reporter” for 23 years and she is the author of four books.

Her book, which is made up of news clippings from various sources, from which we have taken excerpts, gives us a glimpse into life in our area for over a hundred year period ending with stories from 1975.

While her book covers many areas of Leeds and Grenville we have only focused on the area within Elizabethtown-Kitley Township.

Jasper

Harry Moffatt postmaster and merchant of Jasper, had a close call from death on April 25, 1900. He had been to market in Merrickville and was on his way home. He had not sold all his load, and was taking home fie cases of eggs. When he got in front of Alex Clark’s farm, he decided to water his horse and he drove to the waters edge. He cannot explain what happened but the next thing he knew he was in the water, with the struggling horse and wagon on top of him. He used every bit of his strength to reach the surface, and when he got his head above water, he was too weak to crawl out. In the meantime, Mrs. Phillips of Riverview saw the accident and had gone for Mr. Clark. Together they helped him from the water and he had to cling to the fence for some time before he could stand on his feet. He was unable to speak but after they got him to the house and wrapped him in blankets and out his feet in hot water, he quickly recovered. His first concern was for his horse, but Mr. Clark attached a chain to it and pulled it out with his team, but the animal was dead. It was still attached to the wagon.

The cheese factory at Jasper burned on July 7, 1901, the fire starting from the chimney. The proprietor, Isaac H. Fifield, who lived upstairs lost all of his possessions.

Mrs. W.J. Anderson of Jasper was killed in a motor accident at Newbliss on October 30, 1937.

On July 18, 1939 Connerty’s store and Fitzgerald’s Hotel burned at Jasper.

Alfred Leacock of Jasper died of injuries received in a motor accident on November 20, 1940

On November 10, 1959 William McCabe, 51, of Jasper and his 20 year old son Michael drowned when their auto plunged into the Rideau River.

Two sisters, Mrs. Albert W Morrison aged 64 years, and Miss Harriett Cannon aged 68 years died together when their car was struck by an oil truck driven by Garnet Sands of Frankville on May 4, 1961. They lived at Jasper and taught school to Toledo. They were on their way to school at 8:45am and drove from the Jasper Road onto Highway 29, directly in front of Sands who was travelling towards Smiths Falls and he was unable to avoid a collision. Both car and truck were demolished, the latter catching fire and burning to a shell. Sands was able to escape but received severe burns and shock. He had his 3 year old son Terry with him and he was able to save the boy but he was also burned. Mrs. Morrison was the former Edith Pearl Cannon and both sisters were born at Portland. They had been teachers for many years and were very well known and highly regarded.

Damage was estimated at $100,000 when fire destroyed the William Connerty and Son grain elevator and feed plant at Jasper on May 20, 1961. Several hundred tons of grain were in the plant as well as valuable machinery. Firemen were able to save four homes located across the road. A 14 car train of the CPR was due and would have to pass dangerously close to the fire, but it was flagged down. The train was already four hours late due to an accident at Trenton. It was delayed anther hour at the fire scene where CPR officials carefully guided it by the blazing buildings only a few feet from the track.

On May 17, 1961 a large sheet metal warehouse owned by C.A. Pryce was burned at Jasper. The building was full of crown assets merchandise. The Smiths Falls fire department prevented the fire from spreading to other buildings.

On the farm of Lorne Driver on the road between Hwy 29 and Jasper, the fire made a clean sweep of all his outbuildings on June 26, 1965. Seven barns in all fell to flames. Firemen from Smiths Falls were able to save his house. No livestock was lost but one barn contained over $1,000. worth of lumber.

A Jasper youth James Elwood Wells, 19, had a miraculous escape from death on September 16, 1966 when the car he was driving was totally wrecked by a Brockville bound CPR train travelling at 57 miles per hour. The car was hurled 37 feet into a ditch, with the motor torn out and pieces of the vehicle scattered right and left. The youth escaped with a fractured leg and a slight concussion.

Mr. and Mrs. Jonas Ellis of Jasper were married 60 years on May 12, 1969 and were at home to 150 friends and relatives. Mr. Ellis was born at Rocksprings in 1878. He is known by all as “Joney” and he learned the blacksmithing trade early in life and worked at this trade until he was 85 years of age. Mrs. Ellis is the former Eva Edwards and was born at Wolford Centre. They raised a family of 14 children and all are living except one daughter Stella May. They are Ormond, Clayton, Marjorie, Wesley, Donald, Dorothy, Sidney, Geraldine, Meda, Earl, Jean, Norma and Robert.

A Jasper girl, Emily Scouten, aged 16 years, was killed on June 26, 1969 when a car in which she was a passenger crashed in heavy fog. The accident occurred at the Kitley- South Elmsley Line and the driver was William Bertrin, 18, of Perth. Other passengers in the car were Joan Purcell, 20, of Smiths Falls and James Duberville of Brockville who were slightly injured.

Milton Cardiff, 56, drowned at jasper after falling from a boat on August 5, 1973.

Irish Creek

Mr. and Mrs. John Luckey and their daughter Miss. Mary Ann Luckey were murdered at their home at Irish Creek on Oct. 11, 1892

Charles Luckey was hanged in Brockville on December 14 for the murder of his father, mother and sister at Irish Creek, 1893

On February 13, 1909 Michael O’Connor and Henry Rathwell of Kitley had spent the evening at Irish Creek and left about 10 o’clock to return home. The cutter was on its side, the horse was in the ditch tangled up in the harness, O’Connor aged 60 was lying face down in the snow with Rathwell lying on top of him. O’Connor was dead and Rathwell unconscious. Dr. W. Anderson said O’Connor died of suffocation. Rathwell was suffering from frost bite but recovered.

Mrs. Harry Stevens aged 32 and Miss Bessie Jones age 20, were drowned in Irish Creek on September 1, 1909. They had been visiting at the home of Harvey Timleck and went out alone in a boat. No reason can be given for the accident as the water was only three feet deep and they could have easily made it to shore.

The Athens Reporter and County of Leeds Advertiser

Excerpts have been taken from this paper referencing the following hamlet for the years 1889, 1894 and 1895

Tuesday July 16th, 1889

At Irish Creek on Tuesday last, a builder named James Heaslip was rendered insensible by a stroke of lightning, and H. Johnston who was standing by, was slightly injured at the same time. Both men are recovering.

Tuesday April 9, 1895 issue

Miss May Johnson of Irish Creek is the guest of Miss Helen Dixon who recently returned from New York where she was visiting her sister, Mrs. Howard McGrath

Crystal – A Forgotten Hamlet in Kitley

Crystal

kitley-master-1861-62-map-4
Area around Crystal on map of 1861-62

Crystal is an old Irish community located east of Frankville. It lies along Leacock Road. The easiest way to reach Crystal is by taking the Leacock Road out of Frankville and heading due east until reaching Crystal No.8 L.O.L. the centre of the community.

The Irish of Crystal congregated on Lots No 1 to 7 in the 7th Concession of Kitley east of Frankville. Two grist’s mills were erected on the south shore of Irish Lake and since local farmers were noted for their fine grain crops, the mills proved extremely valuable to the community.

First registered owners of lots in the community were the Livingston brothers, Daniel and David. On June 30th, 1801 Daniel took out a 200 acre Crown land grant on Lot No.7 and the same day David was granted 200 acres on Lot No.6 Daniel sold his lot to John Burk, who in turn passed it on to Aaron Montgomery. Montgomery sold it in 1823 to Reuben Graves.

Crystal also had a cheese factory around 1850. The farmers cleared their land and produced wheat, rye, barley, oats, potatoes and vegetables.

Duncan Livingston had a lumber mill operating near Frankville, and there were several grist’s mills running in the area as well.

Oxen were the beasts of burden in the early days, until horses became more prevalent. Farmers also had herds of sheep for booth wool and meat.

Ogle R. Gowan founded Crystal No 8 Orange Lodge in 1832.  Gowan who founded No. 1 Orange Lodge in Brockville began touring the countryside setting up new lodges wherever he deemed the population and times were ripe for such a move.

He was particularly interested in the high Irish population of this section of Kitley. Irish immigrants had homesteaded here in the 1820’s and many were from Protestant families.

Among the Protestant Irish, Gowan found ready fuel for his crusade on behalf of Orangeism. In the spring of 1832 Gowan established Crystal L.O.L. No. 8 being the eighth lodge he had founded in Canada since starting No.1 in Brockville.

The lodge building was erected on Leacock Road passing through this community. The two story hall was equipped with drive sheds in which members tethered their horses and tied up their buggies while attending lodge meetings.

In 1883 Crystal No.8 boasted 56 members who met regularly on the first Tuesday of each month. (Recorder and Times c1985, Darling Collection Bk 5 pg.6/7)

In Kitley Gowan also set up lodges at Toledo, Jasper and Newbliss. The Newbliss branch LOL No 183 was opened July 1, 1835.

In the 1820’s, Irish, English and Scottish settlers flooded into Kitley, helped by free passage over the Atlantic guaranteed by the government and an offer of 100 acres of free land per family.

Many Irish settlers took up homesteads in the area lying east of the present No. 29 highway, along a shallow pond which still today is called Irish Lake. At the north end of the lake, a settlement called Irish Creek grew up. Today it is the modern village of Jasper.

Schools

David Livingston also sold his land, 100 acres to Solomon Easton in 1818 and the balance to the same man a few years later. In the meantime Easton had sold his first purchase to George Hornick who built the area’s first school. The school was located in Lot 6 of the 7th Concession. The exact date of the construction is unknown but it was listed in the 1861 census.

It was a school which held both Kitley and Wolford pupils, being know on the Leeds side as S.S. No.12, Kittley.

In 1861 it was located between the farm houses of George and Robert Hornick and in 1872 the teacher was Samuel Hornick. In 1875 Sam Hornick sold the half acre on which the school was located to the local school trustees.

The school one of the last log structures to be used by the Leeds and Grenville School system was phased out in 1961 after more than a century of service, and Crystal area children were bussed to a new school in Frankville. The old log structure was sold to a Brown Family, moved to the North Augusta Road and renovated as a home.

Religion

Methodists worshipped anywhere they could find shelter, a barn being used on more than one occasion but in 1834, the congregation built a log chapel on the eastern edge of Kitley Township in the community known as Crystal and the church subsequently bore the name “Providence Chapel”.

The church was used until church union in 1935 when it was sold to a local resident who in turn donated it in 1960 to Upper Canada Village.

crystal-lol-1
Crystal Loyal Orange Loge #8, photo taken in 2016
crystal-lol-orange-lodge-8-built-1823-c1985-1
Crystal Loyal Orange Lodge No 8 built in 1823 – photo c1985
crystal-lol-orange-lodge-8-built-1823-c1985-2
Crystal LOL Lodge c1985
crystal-old-log-buildings-c1985-1
Old Log Buildings around Crystal c1985
crystal-log-stable-and-shed-c1985
Old log building and shed c1985
crystal-old-log-buildings-c1985-3
Old Log buildings around Crystal c1985
crystal-old-log-buildings-c1985-2
Old log building around Crystal c1985
crystal-old-log-buildings-c1985-4
Old log buildings around Crystal c1985
providence-chapel-11
Providence Chapel at Upper Canada Village photo 2016
providence-chapel-6
Providence Chapel at Upper Canada Village – photo 2016
providence-chapel-20
Interior of Providence Chapel at Upper Canada Village – photo 2016

 

 

 

 

Blanchard’s Hill – A Forgotten Hamlet in Kitley

Blanchard’s Hill

kitley-master-1861-62-map-2
Location of Blanchard’s Hill on a map of 1861-62

Blanchard’s Hill is reached by two roads, off of No.15 and off of No.29 highways. A large sign on No.15 Hwy three miles southwest of Lombardy proclaims “Blanchard’s Hill Road”. The road takes off from No.15 on an abandoned section of pavement, and then climbs the hill towards the old Blanchard Homestead. From No.29, Shane’s Road running west off that highway runs right into Blanchard’s Hill.

Quaker families fleeing hostility they encountered in the Athens area, were probably the first settlers on this historic hill south of Lombardy.

Among these Quakers were the Palmers and Wiltsies, from Athens. They built up a Quaker settlement here, and it is likely their success led to the migration of the first Blanchard to the hill which bears the family name.

Students of Indian lore believe that the hill was known to the Indians who roamed the Rideau long before the coming of the white man. It is believed the high elevation of Blanchard’s Hill provided a lookout for Indians on their hunting and fishing expeditions into the Rideau.

Albert Blanchard owned 400 acres of prime farmland along the town line between Kitley and South Elmsley, was a Quaker who settled on the hill about 1850.

Members of the Loyalist Blanchard family which settled the Greenbush area, Albert was born at Hard Island north of Athens in 1815. His branch of the Banchard Family embraced the Quaker faith.

He wed Sarah A. Hayes an Athens girl and in 1850 brought his family to Blanchard’s Hill. He died on the hill in 1874. His wife born in 1821 died in 1892 at the age of 71. Albert’s homestead stool across the road from the farm, later owned by Manford Blanchard.

Franklin Blanchard was born in 1860. Franklin’s first wife Martha Seymour died in 1887 at the age of 27 and Franklin married again taking Elizabeth Gardiner as his second bride.

Elizabeth was a daughter of the pioneer Gardiner Family which homesteaded about 1830 on the town line between the townships, about a mile east of Blanchard’s Hill.

blanchards-hill-c1985
Road Sign c1985

Blanchard’s Hill Road is still a gravelled thoroughfare. Entering via the old preserved section of No15 Highway, the traveller will wind up back on No.15 if he continues on past Blanchard’s Hill and follows the winding road westward.

The long abandoned railway line through the area crosses the road twice, but only the weather beaten X-shaped caution signs mark the crossings. The rails are buried deep beneath the gravel.

Irish immigrants were among the first to homestead around the hill, following the Blanchards. About 1845, John Seymour migrated from County Armagh, Ireland and five years later in 1850 brought 100 acres of land on the first concession of South Elmsley, on the rise of land forming the base of the hill.

Travel in the early days was usually undertaken by horseback. Later, stage coaches began runs between settlements, and farm wagons and carts became numerous. Then buggies and gigs became popular.

In the 1830’s the inhabitants of Blanchard’s Hill had little access to other settlements. Consequently they petitioned the old District of Johnstown for a road which would link them with such centres as Perth and Kingston. The Old Perth Trail already linked this area with Lombardy and as a result had a new 50 foot wide road surveyed southward from the Perth Road to Portland where it would connect with the old Kingston Trail.

This new road was put through as far as Banchard’s Hill. From Blanchard’s Hill the road followed a road allowance between Kitley and South Elmsley. This section of road, between Portland and Lombardy, past the foot of Blanchard’s Hill eventually became part of old No.15 highway.

The pioneer Blanchards rest in Union Cemetery in Lombardy. Last of the clan buried there was Charles, who died in November 1984 at the age of 90.  (Recorder and Times c1985, Darling Collection Bk 5, pg.3)

blanchards-hill-w-manford-blanchers-home-at-top-c1985
Blanchard’s Hill with Manford Blanchard’s Home at the top c1985
1998-map-kitley-2
Map of 1998 showing location of Blanchard’s Hill
blanchards-hill-manford-blanchards-home-built-aroud-1895-c1985
Manford Blanchard’s Home built around 1895 – photo c1985
blanchards-hill-school-built-in-1874-c1985
Blanchard’s Hill School built in 1874- photo c1985

 

 

 

 

 

Bellamy’s Mills – A Forgotten Hamlet in Kitley

Bellamy’s Mills

kitley-master-1861-62-map-6
Site of Bellamy’s Mills on a map of 1861-62

The Livingston Brothers were among a group of settlers brought to Kitley by Able Stevens, the pioneer Baptist missionary whose settlements led to the establishment of both Bastard and Kitley townships.

John Livingston dammed Irish Creek to provide a mill pond for his mill. The damming created a lake in the hollow, and when Chauncey Bellamy settled there nearly half a century later the pond became Bellamy Lake.

Duncan, John and William Livingston were operating a grist mill in the hollow below the outlet of Bellamy Lake in 1796.

John and Duncan Livingston built their mill astride of the creek. The water rushing through the tunnel under the mill turned the wheel to run the machinery which ground the corn and wheat of the neighbouring farmers. The mill lasted until around 1840.

Only pieces of the rock dam exist today showing where the Livingston mill once stood.

The Bellamy’s were pioneer millers and industrialists of Leeds and Grenville. Descendants of United Empire Loyalists Justus Bellamy, four brothers came to Canada in 1810. They were Samuel, Edward, Hiram and Chauncey Bellamy.

Sam Bellamy bought a 400 acre farm from Daniel Dunham at North Augusta. There he built a grist mill that operated for over 150 years until it was removed to Upper Canada Village in 1977.

Chauncey Bellamy left his brothers to start his own mill at Dickens, the hamlet on Elbe Creek known today as Glen Elbe.

In 1855 Chauncey moved his wife and family buying a large mill already in operation from the Livingston’s.

He built the first grist mill two miles west of Toledo in 1855. He settled on the shores of the lake which became to be known as Bellamy’s Lake. Bellamy farmed along the south side of the lake, and ran grist’s mills and sawmills in the district. Chauncey took as a partner A.B.Coad, of Toledo, in the operation of a cheese factory which flourished for about 85 years until loss of business forced its closure some 70 years ago.

Only rotten timbers and heaps of stone remain of the many grist and sawmills which once flourished around this community. (The Recorder and Times c1985)

Schools

Bellamy’s Mill was its own common school section, known as school section #10. The school, first built in 1836, was named S.S. #10 Mahon’s School. The first log school house burned down and was rebuilt in the 1850s across the road. The school ran successfully until the 1910s when it was periodically closed and reopened until its permanent closure in the 1940s. At the time of its closure it was converted into a private residence. Additionally at Bellamys Mill was a Roman Catholic separate school, known as R.C. #10. (Wikipedia)

Chancy Bellamy

kitley-residence-and-mills-of-chauncey-bellamy-leavitt-1879
Residence and mills of Chauncey Bellamy with Catholic church in the background- Leavitt’s History of 1879

The subject of this sketch was born at Elbe (Dickens) in 1818. He is the son of Chancy H. Bellamy, who was one of the early settlers of Yonge. In 1843, Mr. Bellamy married a daughter of James Bates, and in 1855 he purchased the property shown in illustration. Naturally of a sanguine disposition, his energy and perseverance have been the means of building up an extensive business at Kitley Mills. Mr. Bellamy is descended from United Empire Loyalist stock, his progenitors being the founders of North Augusta and among the best businessmen of the United Counties (History of Leeds and Grenville from 1749 to 1879 by Thad. W.H. Leavitt pub. 1879)

 

bellamys-gorge-of-marshalls-creek-c1985
Gorge of Marshall’s Creek, where Bellamy’s Mills once stood. The wooden shed is the only remaining section of the mill. To the left of the shed is the residence of Chauncey Bellamy built in 1855. In the background on the hill stands the residence of the priests who served the Roman Catholic Church which once stood nearby.
st-philip-niri-old-cemetery-11
Plaque on hill where St.Philip Neri Church once stood
st-philip-niri-old-cemetery-13
Plaque dedicated to Able Stevens

 

st-philip-niri-old-cemetery-9
Etching on monument to original church
kitley-rc-church-and-rectory-leavitt-c1879
St. Philip Neri Church and Rectory from Leavitt’s History book of 1879

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1998-map-kitley-2
Map of 1998 shows location of Bellamy’s Mills

 

“Edna’s Scrapbook”

is a paperback book written by Edna B. Chant and was published in 1998. Edna Chant was a reported with the “Athens Reporter” for 23 years and she is the author of four books.

Her book, which is made up of news clippings from various sources, from which we have taken excerpts, gives us a glimpse into life in our area for over a hundred year period ending with stories from 1975.

While her book covers many areas of Leeds and Grenville we have only focused on the area within Elizabethtown-Kitley Township.

Bellamy

Mrs. W.H. Baker drowned in Mud Creek at Bellamy April 4, 1917

On November 7, 1953 Rodney Sheffield, 18, of Bellamy was killed in a car accident at Maitland.

The home of Rene Lavoie at Bellamy was destroyed by fire on February 26, 1968.

Jo Ann Van Asseldonk, 19, was killed at Bellamy on August 20, 1973.

The Kitley Centennial Community Park at Bellamy Lake, one mile west of Toledo, was officially opened on July 15, 1967 with over 1000 persons attending the ceremonies led by township Reeve James Rae Jr., assisted by former Reeve Charles Sands who had launched the project. Speeches were given by the Hon. James Auld; John R. Matheson, MP for Leeds; Des Code, MP for Lanark; George Brown, Warden of the United Counties; a former Reeve Billy Bell and members of the Kitley Council; Rev. J.P. Ainslie gave the invocation. All kinds of sports and contests were enjoyed and 500 persons enjoyed lunch. Prizes were won by oldest couple on the grounds Mr. and Mrs. John Richards whose combined ages were 184 years; former Kitley resident travelling the farthest Herbert Bellamy, London, Ontario. The youngest child born in 1967 was Laurie Lynn Moran, born June 5, 1967

 

Frankville – A Hamlet in Kitley

Frankville

kitley-master-1861-62-map-1
Location of Fankville on map of 1861-62

The first Loyalist came in 1784 and a large number settled in Kitley Township in the years 1784 to 1830. They laboured hard to build up this community.

Kitley was surveyed in 1797 and thrown open to settlers. Among the first to arrive was Loyalist Major William Read who had originally secured Crown land in New Brunswick after the American Revolutionary War, then moved westward to Kitley. He was granted 400 acres in Kitley including 200 acres on the 8th concession near the present site of Frankville. This was his home and he became one of the leaders of the new community.

Though he was past 60, Major Read organized a band of 60 volunteers for service in the War of 1812 and trained them himself. Three of his sons fought in the war. Major Read died in 1828 aged 79. His remains lie in an abandoned cemetery on his old homestead. At the time of his death, Kitley numbered 575 souls.

Several Livingston families also settled here and the 1800 census of Kitley lists David, Daniel, Duncan and Abraham Livingston. Duncan Livingston built a grist mill on his homestead a mile east of Frankville.

Another pioneer was Levi Soper, owner of the land on which now stands the village of Frankville. Ben Wilson bought the Soper land in 1826 and sold it 11 years later to John Brennan.

As a result of these changes in ownership the community bore several different names in its early history. It was known as Wilson’s Corners, Brennan’s Corners Brandenburg and Brennanville. In 1852 when a post office was established the name Frankville was adopted.

Historians are at a loss to explain why the post office chose “Frankville”. No pioneer by the name “Frank” appears in the early records.

Levi Soper was a character from Vermont who was reputed to have reached Kitley in 1800 with only a cow as his possession. He teamed the cow with a neighbour’s horse to clear both his farm and that of his neighbour. He settled on Lot 21 of the 9th Concession of Kitley. The southern section of Frankville covers part of the north half of the Soper farm.  In 1826 he sold his farm to Ben Wilson, who already held Lot 21 in the 8th Concession. Wilson thus owned all the land on which the village was built.  After selling out to Wilson, Soper moved west to the Read of Leeds and Lansdowne where be founded the community of Soperton.

Levi’s cousin. Timothy, settled east of Frankville  about 1805 and became an agent for the settlers, bringing in supplies and taking their grain to grist mills for milling.

Early Mills

The first grist mill near Frankville was established about 1802 by Duncan Livingston on a creek a mile east of Frankville. Here grain for miles around was ground into flour. Duncan operated the mill for about 15 ears before selling out to Timothy Soper.

Later, the grist mill was converted to a sawmill and much of the lumber used in construction in this area during the 19th Century was produced here. A second sawmill stood on the West side of Highway 29 the site in the 1980’s was occupied by the construction buildings of the Brundige Construction Company.

The original Livingstone mill was located on a small tributary of Irish Lake, a mile east of Frankville and the pioneer who built it accomplished a marvel of engineering.

“Water was dammed by a long high stone wall” says author Glenn Lockwood in his book “Kitley 1795-1975”, “forming a miniature mill pond at least 10 feet deep. The dam wall was 12 feet high, solidly constructed of stone, 100 feet long. It was located between two high banks of the creek bed.”

Unlike other mills of the period, Livingstone’s plant did not operate by either plume of water or waterfall, but instead the creek water was allowed to flow gently down an incline of stone to rotate a mill wheel lying horizontal to the creek bed. The water rotated the wheel to which were attached spindles and gears which operated the saws in the mill. The main saw was vertical, later replaced by a more modern horizontal blade.

The mill ran until around 1880. The plant then fell into disuse and around 1940 a stone crusher was brought to the site to crush the stone retrieved from the old dam and walls. Now only a few crumbling remains of Livingston Dam can be seen at the site.

Many of the new settlers were discharged soldiers from the War of 1812. Each private received a grant of 100 acres, each officer received 200 acres. These grants were increased in 1816 to 200 acres for sergeants, 1000 acres for a major and 1,200 acres for a Lieutenant Colonel.

The government provided tools and necessities for these new settlers. Where the Loyalists often received no more than an axe and a hoe, the ex-soldiers were given several different types of axes, spades, shovels, handsaws, crosscut saws and building tools.

frankville-1861-62-map
Detail map of Frankville, Map of 1861-62

In the 1820’s, Irish, English and Scottish settlers flooded into Kitley, helped by free passage over the Atlantic guaranteed by the government and an offer of 100 acres of free land per family.

In 1846, Frankville boasted 50 residents, a store, two taverns, a saddler and a blacksmith. Three years later 100 persons lived there and another 150 resided at Chamberlain’s Corners (Toledo) two miles to the north.

The village continued to grow and in 1858, a business directory showed three shoemakers, two innkeepers, two traders, a tanner, a grocer, a wagon maker, the clerk of the division court and a postmaster William Smith.

Construction of the Victoria Macadamized Road in the 1850’s spurred development. The road, once called the Perth Road, later became Highway 29.

Hiram McCrae, born in 1807 in Montague township, son of a United Empire Loyalist from Albany, NY settled in Frankville in 1837 and 21 years later became reeve of Kitley, serving in that post for 32 years. He was named a magistrate in 1853 and later became clerk of the court of the seventh division of Leeds and Grenville.

In 1861 Frankville had four hotels running plus a private tavern. There were two stores, a tannery, paint shop, harness shop, blacksmith and a variety store.

Ten years later, the population stood at 200, catered to by three hotels, four blacksmiths, three harness makers, three shoemakers, two tanners, two carriage makers, two milliners, three stores and a host of other businesses.

Ben Stewart, one of the carriage makers forged ahead with the development of what he called the “Sarven Wheel” for buggies. It was a sturdy but stylish wheel intended for fancy carriages and proved to be in great demand. His factory, long since gone, flourished on the east side of Highway 29.

A brickyard was established in 1870 by blacksmith William Dowsley but he ran out of a good supply of clay by 1879 and returned to his blacksmith’s forge.

At that time about 300 persons lived in the village. But the population fell off during the 1890’s and by 1920 was down around 200.

The brick rectory that serves the church was once a hotel. Frankville once boasted five hotels and was a thriving community with three general stores.

Cheese Factory

The Frankville Cheese Factory was established by Tom Livingston about 1860. Joseph Jones and Abraham Robb took over the factory in the 1880’s and branched out to produce butter and whey. Business dropped off in the 1920’s and the factory was closed. In the 1980’s the building still stood and had been turned into an apartment block, still facing Hwy 29.

 

Churches

Kitley’s first chapel was Providence Church, which is preserved at Upper Canada Village as an example of the Houses of Worship available to the early pioneers of Leeds and Grenville. Providence Church was opened on February 1, 1834 and served the Toledo-Jasper area for over 100 years before being closed. It is unique in that the pews appear as they did 150 years ago, plain wooden benches without backs. A simple lectern without frills served the rector. Providence was built by the Methodists of early Kitley.

St. Thomas Anglican Church

frankville-st-thomas-anglican-church-c1985
St Thomas Anglican Church c1985

Built in 1858, the venerable St, Thomas’ Anglican church stood two years empty because no resident clergyman was available to conduct services in the building.

The brick rectory that serves the church was once a hotel. Frankville once boasted five hotels and was a thriving community with three general stores.

Rev. Thomas Bedford-Jones, a young Irish clergyman who arrived in Canada in 1862, in his memoirs told of the unique situation of the church. The church had been built by Frankville Anglicans who “begged” the money all over the countryside to erect the house of worship by public subscription. He found the church still in debt to the tune of $1000.

Bedford-Jones had been appointed as a missionary to the township of Kitley and became the first resident pastor of St Thomas’

He wrote: “The church was opened by me on Advent Sunday, 1862. In 1863 and 1864 in the springtime when the state of the roads made it difficult for the congregation to turn out I had to go on begging expeditions to Kingston and Toronto on behalf of this dreadful debt, which at last was reduced to about $225. Then an appeal was made to parishioners who were chiefly farmers and for the most part with mortgages on their land. To make an earnest effort to wipe off the debt, I induced nine leading men to join me in subscribing $10. each. The balance I proposed to make up by the amount of butter deliberately given to me for one month all over the parish, with its three congregations. The amount calculated at three pounds per family per week from each family, together with our $100. was estimated to pay off all the legitimate claims. The idea took hold of the people and the money was all brought in before the first day of the New Year 1865 and the debt was paid.”

frankville-st-thomas-rectory-once-a-hotel-150-yrs-old-c1985
St. Thomas Rectory, once a hotel c1985

The congregation of St. Thomas’ went without butter for one month in order to raise funds to pay off the church debt.

Early records of Anglican congregations in Frankville are lost to antiquity, but it is believed that services were held in private homes, with travelling ministers officiating.

The church was built of stone with a tall spire at the front. It proved to be a sturdy structure, although its steeple disappeared in a fierce windstorm in 1950. A new pyramid shaped dome, crowned with a new cross, was placed on the tower by local contractor Ernest Montgomery.

Frankville’s United Church began life as an Episcopal Methodist institution in 1878. It replaced a small wooden church built by Wesleyan Methodists in 1857. The congregation disbanded in 1968 and joined St. Andrews’. The building was sold to the Pentecostal Assembly of Canada.

Early Doctors

The main grocery store in this village, once housed the medical practice of two pioneer doctors. Dr. William F. Bourns born in 1861 near Addison , began his practice here in 1891 and served the community for 35 years. He joined Dr. Mort Dixon, a native of the village I a practice which occupied offices upstairs over the store.

Dr. Dison’s father George A. Dixon had operated the store for many years. In 1900 the two doctors bought the old Edger Hotel with the intention of turning it into a hospital. But before the conversion could take place, the old hotel caught fire and burned to the ground. When the site had been cleared, Dr. Bourns erected his own home there. The hospital scheme died in the fire. Both doctors died shortly after.

Early Schools

Levi Soper owned a homestead three miles to the east of Fankville. A school was built on part of this property. The school stands on the 9th Concession, but the road running past the school building is Morrison Road, Kitley 8th line. The school fence runs between the two concessions..

frankville-soper-school-c1985
Soper School photo c 1985

The origins of the original Soper School have been lost in the sands of time. It was probably a log cabin school and existed on the site as early as 1820. This original one room school was known as Otterman’s School, from the Otterman family living nearby. Later when Soper deeded the land over to the School Section board it became Soper School.

A stone building supplanted the original log school and it served the community until it was destroyed by fire in 1912. The present stone building was erected on the site in the same year. George Brundige was the contractor when the school was rebuilt. The building was constructed of square cut stone locally quarried The inside was finished with a white plaster. A raised platform was installed for the teacher. (SS # 13, Kitley)

Among the first settlers around the old school site were the Morrisons, Wilkins, Pryces, Sopers, Wrights, Reynolds, Barringstons, Davises, Mulvaughs, Steacys, Hewitts, Hantons, Brundiges, Merciers. Later the Cooks and O’Gradys moved in.

Louise Mulvaugh was a teacher there prior to 1900. In the 1900’s teachers included Miss. Cocklin (1908), Miss. Greeves; Kenneth Blanchard, Miss. Clow, Misses Nellie and Rose Judge and Fred Leacock who later became a doctor and was killed in a car accident. First salaries paid to teachers ran from $200. to $300. per year. Average attendance was 25-30 pupils but when the school closed in the 1960’s attendance was down to 12.

 

Excerpts from “Leeds Grenville: their first two hundred years”

by Ruth McKenzie pub. 1967

The Livingstones also settled on the seventh and eighth concessions.The names Daniel, David, Duncan and Abraham all appear on the Kitley census of 1800. Duncan Livingstone built a grist mill which he operated for about fifteen years. His farm was on the eighth concession, a mile east of the present village of Frankville.

This village is situated on Lot 21, Concessions 8 and 9, Kitley. The original owner of the lot on the ninth concession was Levi Soper, and part of the village stood on the north end of his farm. The lot on the eighth concession was granted to Benjamine Wilson in 1830. Four years previously he had obtained the north half of the Soper property. The village of Frankville was then on Wison property. Wilson sold the land in 1837 to John Brennan.

These changes of ownership help to explain why the village of Fankville has had so many different names. In early records of the Counties Council, it is referred to variously as Brennan’s Corners, Wilson’s Corners, Brandenburgh, Brennanville and Frankville. Finally in 1852 when the ost office was established there, it was called Frankville, the name that had been used more persistently than any other over the years. Where the Frank comes from, no one seems to know.

Among the early cheese factories was one in Frankville established by M.K.Everts and Isaac Cooledge in 1866. (this differs from the information found in old issues of the recorder and times as written above)

 

Excerpts from the “History of Leeds and Grenville from 1749 to 1879”

by Thad. W.H.Leavitt pub 1879

frankville-hunts-hotel-jas-hunt-prop-leavitt-1879
Hunt’s Hotel, James Hunt Proprietor (print from Levitt’s Book)

James Hunt is the son of Absalom who married Maria Warren. James was born in 1850; he earned the carriage making business from his father, which he has conducted with success in Frankville and Toledo. Mr. Hunt married in 1872, Margaret the daughter of Richard Johnston, Elizabethtown. A few years since he purchased the residence of the late Captain Brennan; it being destroyed by fire, he erected an elegant brick structure for hotel purposes. He also carries on the carriage business in Frankville. (History of Leeds and Grenville from 1749 to 1879 by Thad. W.H. Leavitt pub. 1879)

 

The Connor Family & Samuel Connor – William Connor came from the County of Caven, Ireland in the year 1821, and settled on the 8th Concession of Kitley, from which place he removed to the farm he now occupies, near the Village of Frankville. He married, about the year 1830, Ellen Horton, by whom he had the following children: Robert, residing in Brockville; Samuel; William who died in 1850; Margaret married Alexander Morrison; Philip died in 1877; Ann married Robert Jelly; and Thomas.

frankville-connor-house-s-connor-prop-leavitt-1879
Connor House, from Levitt’s History of 1879

Samuel Connor was born in 1837, on the old homestead. At the age of sixteen he was apprenticed to Wellington Lewis, to learn the trade of shoemaker. Aftre a service of three ears he removed to Frankville; then visited the Western States, but returned to Frankville, where he opened a shoe shop in connection with a tannery and continued the same about twelve years. In 1870, he built a large hotel engaging also in the manufacture of cheese. Disposing of his hotel n 1876, he purchased the Robinson House, which he refitted in the most substantial manner for the accommodation of old friends.

In 1864, Mr. Connor married Charlotte Burnett, of Elizabethtown; and in 1868, he was appointed Township Clerk, a position which he yet fills. (History of Leeds and Grenville from 1749 to 1879 by Thad. W.H. Leavitt pub. 1879)

Joseph Coad

Mr. Coad was born April 13, 1842 in the Township of Kitley. He redeived a good education at Public School, and for some years engaged as a teacher. Subsequently he entered into the mercantile business with his brother at Toledo.

frankville-store-of-j-coad-leavitt-18979
Store of J.Coad- Leavitt’s History of 1879

In 1874, he purchased the general store in Frankville, at that time conducted by Messrs. C. and R. Richards, and since that date has carried on a large and constantly increasing business. Mr. Coad for served for several years as Secretary of the Agriculture Society of North Leeds and Grenville. He has been twice elected a member of the Municipal Council, and is especially qualified to discharge public business. In 1873, Mr. Coad married Maggie, daughter of Thomas Connor. The Dominion Telegraph Office and the Post Office at Frankville are under Mr. Coad’s supervision.

 

frankville-public-school-c1985
Frankville Public School c1985
frankville-sketch-of-dacks-tavern
Sketch of Dack’s Tavern
frankville-maxwells-tavern-on-the-road-to-dodds-corners-c1985
Maxwell’s Tavern on the road to Dodd’s Corners c1985
frankville-old-connor-house-pioneer-hotel-c1985
Connor House, old pioneer hotel c1985
frankville-1
Looking north into Frankville photo 2016
frankvile-hantons-general-store-c1985
Hanton’s General Store, c1985
frankville-looking-south-c1985
Frankville going south c1985

 

 

 

dacks-tavern-built-in-1818-c1985
Dack’s Tavern c1985

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Edna’s Scrapbook”

is a paperback book written by Edna B. Chant and was published in 1998. Edna Chant was a reported with the “Athens Reporter” for 23 years and she is the author of four books.

Her book, which is made up of news clippings from various sources, from which we have taken excerpts, gives us a glimpse into life in our area for over a hundred year period ending with stories from 1975.

While her book covers many areas of Leeds and Grenville we have only focused on the area within Elizabethtown-Kitley Township.

Frankville

The first post office at Wilson’s Corners was opened on January 5, 1841

Mrs. John Loucks of Frankville was a leap year baby. She was the former Annetta Richards and was born near Frankville on Feb. 29, 1868 and lived to be 101 years of age. In that time she only celebrated 24 birthdays. She married John Loucks on her birthday, Feb, 29, 1888. Before her marriage she was a school teacher and since that time the couple farmed at Frankville. Mrs. Loucks drove a rig from Frankville to the Brockville Market weekly, with fresh eggs, homemade butter, vegetables and maple syrup. She well remembered how she dreaded to meet an automobile as the horses never got used to them and would rear in fright. One of her fondest memories was how they enjoyed their battery radio, as it was a pleasure on long winter evenings. She was a real hockey fan, Boston being her favourite team. After the death of her husband, she lived with her only son George, who died Feb 13, 1966. Her last years were spent with her grandson and his wife Jim and Doreen Loucks in Brockville. Annetta Loucks died on Dec 14, 1869.

The Village of Frankville was incorporated in 1896. For 77 years only seven By-Laws were passed. On April 10, 1973 the police village passed out of existence and all assets were turned over to the Township of Kitley.

Raney Loucks of Frankville was killed on November 19, 1897 when he was thrown from a wagon. He had gone to Brockville to meet his son James who was returning home on train from the west and they were almost home when his team of horses ran away, and he was thrown to the road, landing on his head, dying instantly.

Mr and Mrs. James Rae of Frankville lived to observe their 70th wedding anniversary. They had enjoyed a happy and useful life, and became known as the grand old couple of Kitley. They were married Dec. 29, 1899 in Dally, Ayrshire, Scotland where they lived for their first 29 years of their life and where Mr. Rae was a blacksmith by trade. They came to Canada in 1928 and he opened a blacksmith shop in Frankville which business he carried on for many years. In 1961 he retired and they moved to a new bungalow. They raised four children James Jr., Jessie, Marion and Jean, Mr. Rae died on Jan. 1, 1970 aged 95 years, and Mrs. Rae died on Feb 14, 1972 aged 96 years.

On Feb 4, 1903, the barns of Wesley Soper at Frankville were struck by lightning in a most unusual winter electric storm When Mr. Soper rushed to the barn to rescue the cattle he found all 21 dead in their stalls. He lost 30 pigs in the fire as well as all his machinery. He carried $500. of insurance.

A well known Frankville woman, Mrs. Richard Hanton, was drowned in the St. Lawrence River in Brockville on May 2, 1903. She had been a patient in hospital but was much improved and went for a walk each day. On this day she did not return for lunch, and a search was made for her In the meantime, her body was found floating by two young boys who told the police.

On July 3, 1905, George Oliver of Frankville drowned in Saskatchewan

On July 12, 1906 fire destroyed all the barns of John Reynolds at Frankville. It was started by a young boy playing with matches. As nearly all the men of the area had gone to the Orange Walk it was hard to get help. The men and women who came had a hard time to save the house.

On September 5, 1906 Norman Godrich, aged 40, died after suffering a bad fall at the Frankville Cheese Factory. He was taken to hospital in an unconscious condition but died in a short time. As far as we know he had no relatives. He had worked at the factory some time and was well thought of.

The barns on the Henry Johnston farm at Frankville were burned in August 1908. The owner lives in Saskatchewan but the farm is rented to William Curtis. When Mr. Curtis went to the barn in the morning he found a tramp sleeping in the hay mow. He ordered him off the place. The tramp was very angry and he said he would make it hot for him. Mr. Curtis went to the factory and when he was going back home he saw smoke coming from the barn. The fire spread rapidly and all the season’s crops were lost as well as seven pigs.

Two serious fires in Frankville caused a lot of excitement on November 6, 1916; the large barn of Watson Davis was burned. It must have been arson as the fire broke out in three locations at once, A calf was burned, but the cows were saved. Al the hay and grain was lost, also some tools and a wagon. On November 7 the barn of James Smith was burned and many places threatened. Richard’s store was scorched, and also William Ennis’ barn. Men of the village worked all night to save them. W. Richards thought his store was going and he had a heart attack and nearly died.

On October 11, 1935 hydro power was turned on at Frankville.

Irene Mott was killed July 5, 1938 by a farmhand at Frankville.

Willard Wing, age 3 drowned in a water tank at Frankville in 1942

An Athens man Arthur Reed, 42, was fatally injured on July 11, 1957 while at work at the Brundige Construction Co., in Frankville. He was welding  a tar tank when it exploded hurling his body into the air and blowing the roof off of the shop. He was rushed by ambulance to Kingston General Hospital but only lived a short time.

On August 31, 1958 a twister assed over Frankville causing a lot of destruction in just a few seconds. A garage owned by James Dawson was lifted from its foundations and carried 30 feet. Dawson’s car in te garage didn’t have a scratch. Trees went down like ten pins all over the village smashing several cars under their weight. A shed owned by Gerald Mercier was rolled over three times and came down again right side up. Roofs were carried away on the farms of Donald Davis and Byron Derbyshire.

On December 31, 1967, the home of Mrs. Ethel Neddo of Frankville was burned. Everything was lost, including all the clothing of her son George and two boarders Terry Reed and George Ouderkik.

A small house near Frankville was burned on April 29, 1969, occupied by Mr. and Mrs. Jordan Morris and their three children. Mr. Morris had gone to work at 6 am and shortly after an explosion occurred in the kitchen, The family escaped in their night attire.

Spring Valley – A Hamlet in Elizabethtown

Spring Valley (Niblock’s Corners)

elizabethtown-master-1861-62-map-5
Location of Spring Valley on 1861-62 Map

Spring Valley is located 7 miles north of Brockville on Highway 29, or what once the Victoria Macadamized Road, the main road, and stage coach route, leading from Brockville to Perth.

Located at Spring Valley is a famous old inn “Toppler’s Tavern” built in 1808. The home was originally built for Col. Samuel Wright and was set on 700 acres of land. Col. Wright was a New Yorker who fought in the British Army during the American Revolutionary War. He was rewarded with a grant of 700 acres of land in Elizabethtown covering Lot no 21 and 22 in the Fourth Concession.

When Col. Wright died the house passed into the hands of the Topper family and the rooms were divided off to cater to guests.

Topper’s Tavern proved highly popular with a hosts of Leeds travellers. The Inn served fine old English ale, beer and a variety of liquors    (Recorder and Times, Darling Collection Book 3)

Spring Valley did not really coalesce into a village. Partly this was due to geography. It was not at the intersection of any concession, but rather it was between two parallel roads, the old bush trail and the realigned Highway 29. Along the highway Spring Valley stretches from the 4th Concession road to Murray Road.

Originally known as Niblock’s Corners, after Absalom Niblock, a carriage maker, the community was renamed Spring Valley by the post office which was changing names all over the province. It was named in reference to he artesian spring that bubbles out of the ground and crosses the highway, the headwaters of the Lyn Creek. (Elizabethtown: The Last of the Royal Townships by Alvyn Austin pub 2009)

spring-valley-toppers-tavern-c1980-darling-bk3p197
Topper’s Tavern c1985
spring-valley-wright-house-photo-alvyn-austin
Wright House (photo Alvyn Austin)
spring-valley-school-closes-1965-a-2
Spring Valley School, now a library and community centre
spring-valley-calss-photo-c1937-sf111
Spring Valley School Class of 1937
1-spring-valley
Spring Valley on current map of 2016
spring-valley-davidson
Advertisement from the Athen’s Reporter c1889

“Edna’s Scrapbook”

is a paperback book written by Edna B. Chant and was published in 1998. Edna Chant was a reported with the “Athens Reporter” for 23 years and she is the author of four books.

Her book, which is made up of news clippings from various sources, from which we have taken excerpts, gives us a glimpse into life in our area for over a hundred year period ending with stories from 1975.

While her book covers many areas of Leeds and Grenville we have only focused on the area within Elizabethtown-Kitley Township.

Spring Valley

Carl Ellis 7, and Fred 6, brothers, drowned in a quarry at Spring Valley in 1944.

 

Row’s Corners – A Hamlet in Elizabethtown

Row’s Corners

elizabethtown-master-1861-62-map-1
Area of Row’s Corners on 1861-62 Map

While the United Empire Loyalists of 1784 opened up the St.Lawrence River areas of Elizabethtown and Augusta late in the 18th Century, it was not until the early 1800’s the tide of immigration reached the ‘back40’s’ of these townships.

One of these early homesteaders was farmer Peter McEachron who proved up on a Crown Grant of 200 acres on Lot No. 6 of the 4th Concession of Elizabethtown on February 10, 1803.

McEachron, whose name is misspelled in Land Registry books as “McCatherine”, must have also been a speculator for 14 months after taking possession, he sold the entire 200 acres to Nathan Clark, McEachron’s attorney. Daniel McEachron, probably a son engineered the deal.

The Clark Family was to remain in possession of all or parts of Lot No. 6 for over 100 years. On February 4, 1844, Nathan Clark sold the eastern quarter, 50 acres, to his son Robert C.Clark.

Robert’s will, December 11, 1858, split the property among his children, Robert Jr., W.C. Clark, Reuel Clark and Mirole Clark.

What was the Country Road Garden Centre occupied the centre 17 acre tract of the old homestead, while separate residences sit on many parts of the old farm. The United Counties of Leeds and Grenville own several parcels of land hacked off the homestead.

When McEachron accepted his 200 acre grant the land was overgrown with forests.

Indians, still seen in the neighbourhood when McEachron arrived, had used the area for years for hunting and fur trapping activities.

Spruce and pine, tamarack and cedar, chokecherry trees and sugar plum bushes predominated. McEachron spent the summer of 1803 clearing lumber off his land. The pine and spruce trees gave him logs for his cabin. The cedar provided him with fencing.

Hunting was good and McEachron and his neighbours lived off the land, bagging deer, wildfowl and fish.

rowes-cor-wb6
Homestead at Rowe’s Corners

 

 

 

 

 

drive-in-1957
Aerial view of Rowe’s Corners and the famous Drive-In c1957
brockville-drive-in-digital-file-mack-2
Row’s Corners is probably best know to many of us for the nights we spent at the Drive In that was located there.
brockville-drive-in-digital-file-mack-1
Brockville Drive In
pony-at-drive-in-theatre-1955
Pony Night at he Drive In c1955

 

map-of-elizabethtown
Row’s Corners Map of 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

rows-corners-1892
Cole Bros advertisement in The Athens Reporter- 1892

“Edna’s Scrapbook”

is a paperback book written by Edna B. Chant and was published in 1998. Edna Chant was a reported with the “Athens Reporter” for 23 years and she is the author of four books.

Her book, which is made up of news clippings from various sources, from which we have taken excerpts, gives us a glimpse into life in our area for over a hundred year period ending with stories from 1975.

While her book covers many areas of Leeds and Grenville we have only focused on the area within Elizabethtown-Kitley Township.

Row’s Corners

John McNish of Rows Corners aged 66 years, was killed when struck by lightning while working in a field on May 10, 1883

Excerpts from:

The Athen’s Reporter from Jan 31, 1889 to Dec 31, 1889

Rows Corners

Jan 15 1889

Messrs Cole Bros of Row’s Corners have rebuilt their carriage works recently destroyed by fire, and are now ready to transact business as usual. Their pluck and enterprise are commendable

 

 

Rocksprings – A Hamlet in Elizabethtown

Rocksprings

elizabethtown-master-1861-62-map-3
Location of Rock Spring on map of 1861-62

This old community is reached by Leeds County Road 7 which runs north from Greenbush and runs directly into this hamlet.

Around 1855, Billy Wilmer heard of an everlasting sweet water spring near the Elizabethtown – Kitley border. He decided he would find it and settle there. He reached the spring and discovered that it flowed constantly, winter and summer. He built a log cabin beside the spring and settled down with his bride, the former Jane Empry, both were immigrants from Ireland. Later as his farm prospered, Wilmer built a fine stone residence at the north end of his homestead on the Kitley side of the border. The old spring still flows in the bush land south of the house, but the old log cabin has disappeared

The first store in Rocksrings was in the log home of a pioneer named Wiseman. Following Wiseman storekeepers were Richard Latimer, James Hicks, Jack O’Neill and Levi Howe. Sometime before the turn of the century the new corner store was established with Levi Howe as proprietor. The site of the Wiseman store was once occupied by the Holiness Movement Church (Hornerite).

The Rocksprings United Church was opened January 8, 1899 as Rocksprings Methodist Church, and became United on church union in 1925. The formal dedication service in 1899 was performed by the Rev. Dr. William Ryckman. An oyster supper concluded the ceremonies. The church seated 160 and was built at a cost of $910. The land was donated by Samuel Tackaberry.

The Rocksprings School boasted an enrolment in 1909 of 33 area children. It was closed during the school consolidations of the 1960’s.

In the days when cheese sold for less than 10¢ a pound, the Rocksprings Cheese factory used to turn out over 25,000 pounds of cheese a week. Books of the old factory tell details of transactions in the year 1902. Receipts for one week were listed at $2,409.67 for 25,199 pounds of cheese, selling a 9.562¢ a pound. The farmers whose milk went into the factory received $2,023.78 in cash and $18.27 in cheese for those who accepted cheese for cash. The factory is believed to have been built by D.M. Wilson sometime before 1900 and flourished until the 1940’s. It has been since torn down, the old cheese makers house stands across the road from where the factory once stood.

One of the most majestic figures of the late 1890’s in this area was a tall broad shouldered blacksmith named William Barber. Barber doubled as the caretaker of the old Rocksprings School and the Methodist Church. A devout church goer Barber was known to generations of Rockspring schoolchildren in the four decades he worked there 1890-1930. Barber ran a blacksmith shop on the main corner of Rocksprings. The building is gone, but people used to recall the huge figure of Barber standing over the glowing coals in his forge as he fashioned horseshoes.

(Recorder and Times, Darling Collection Book 3)

elizabethtown-kitley-master-1800-map-1
Map showing spelling as Rock Springs
rocksprings-1
Road sign leading into Hamlet- photo 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

rocksprings-school-c1935-darling-bk3p173
School House c1935
rocksprings-temptance-bldg-july-2016
Temperance Hall photo 2016
rocksprings-george-maud-homestead-1900-darling-bk3p177-copy
Gorge Maud Homestead c1900
rocksprings-old-wilmer-homestead-on-e-k-town-line-darling-bk3p174
Wilmer Homestead c1985
rocksprings-william-barber-the-blacksmith-darling-bk3p178
William Barber, the blacksmith
rocksprings-general-store-c1980-darling-bk3p173
General Store at Rocksprings c1985

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

rocksprings-church-july-2016-2
Rocksprings Methodist Church photo 2016
rocksprings-methodist-ch-darling-bk3p176
Rocksprings Methodist Church c1985

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

driving-party-tbt-jan-18-1905
News Story Jan 18, 1905

 

“A jolly driving party from Brockville was entertained Tuesday night at the home of Miss. M.Mott, Rockspring. Owing to the heavy roads the band sleigh upset twice on the trip but the occupants ecsaped injury. The outing was throughly enjoyed by all” (The Brockville Times January 18, 1905)

 

“Edna’s Scrapbook”

is a paperback book written by Edna B. Chant and was published in 1998. Edna Chant was a reported with the “Athens Reporter” for 23 years and she is the author of four books.

Her book, which is made up of news clippings from various sources, from which we have taken excerpts, gives us a glimpse into life in our area for over a hundred year period ending with stories from 1975.

While her book covers many areas of Leeds and Grenville we have only focused on the area within Elizabethtown-Kitley Township.

Rock Spring

The new Methodist Church at Rockspring was opened on January 8, 1899, It is a neat frame building with a spire and will seat 160. The land was donated free of charge by Sam Tackaerry. The total cost of the church was $910. of which $600. has been paid. At the opening services Rev. E.W.Crane preached in the morning and Rev. J.A.Bell in the evening. The church was filled and the choir from Easton’s Corners furnished music. On Monday night an oyster supper was held. Rev. Ryckman gave the financial statement and invited further donations and over $300. was given, clearing the church of all debt.

The home of Wesley Burridge of Rocksprings was burned on September 28, 1930. The only thing saved from the home was the piano. The members of the family had to escape in their night clothing.

July 31, 1933, During a very severe electrical storm Henry Barns at Jellby had eight cows killed and Harry Cooper, Rocksprings lost three horses. The lightning was the worst seen in some years.

Stanley Pearce of Rockspring, 62, was killed in Quebec August 19, 1969.

 

The Athens Reporter and County of Leeds Advertiser

Excerpts have been taken from this paper referencing the following hamlet for the years 1889, 1894 and 1895

Nov 18, 1894 issue-

Addison, Saturday Nov.10-

Mr. William Peterson of Rocksprings has leased the residence on King st. from Mr. Frank Eiltse, of Silver Brook. We extend a hearty welcome.

Tuesday Feb. 26, 1895 issue

We wish to inform the Times correspondent of the little hamlet of Rocksprings that the “long haired hungry grits” are preparing a more expeditious vehicle than the velocipede to do duty at the next election

Tuesday July 9, 1895 issue

Mr. Hudson Kendrick of this place who is in the employment of Mr. Wilson of Rockspring as cheese maker, and his chum, Mr. George Steacy, were visiting friends here on Sunday last. Huds look hale and hearty.

Linden Bank – A Forgotten Hamlet in Elizabethtown

Linden Bank

elizabethtown-master-1861-62-map-2
Area of settlement on map of 1861-62

Linden Bank was founded by United Empire Loyalists in 1798, 14 years after the initial UEL drive into Leeds and Grenville in 1784. The community did not receive its name until 135 years ago.

Col. John Butler Checkley, an Irish militiaman, came to Canada in the 1890’s to settle on the front half of Lot Number 6 in the Seventh Concession of Elizabethtown. His estate faces the Brockville-North Augusta Road about 10 miles out of Brockville and four miles southwest of North Augusta.

The Checkleys called their farm “Linden Bank” from the Linden trees growing along the bank of the creek flowing past their dwelling. (Linden trees are also known as basswood trees).

In time the entire community around the Checkley Farm became known as “Linden Bank”, and there was a post office by that name located on Gosford Road.

The area was settled by Loyalists. There were no roads, only wagon trails connecting the various farms of the region. The loyalists made their landings at Buell’s Bay on the Brockville waterfront, and then trekked by foot or wagon through 18 miles of bush to reach their future home sites.

Following an old Indian Trail, the newcomers took two to three days to make the arduous trip. The area had been newly surveyed, but the only way to reach the future Linden Bank was to follow an Indian Trail from Brockville to Lamb’s Pond (New Dublin) then east through Bellamy’s to reach Linden Bank. The direct route from Brockville to North Augusta was established after the community developed.

The settlers cut a wagon road through the hardwood forest from Lamb’s Pond to their homesteads. En route they had to traverse the high rise of land known as “the mountain” on Lot No 5, using a pass known to the Indians. The original road crossed a swamp on the other side of the rise. In subsequent years a road composed of logs was laid across the swamp. Traces of this road could still be seen in the early 1900’s.

Clearing their land, the pioneers grew wheat, Indian corn and vegetables, ran cattle and sheep and lived off the plentiful game on the mountain and in the woods. In the spring they tapped maple trees for sap and boiled it down to syrup and sugar for their tables.

Most had huts of log cabins built on their cleared land or in clearings near their homesteads. Some of these huts were located as dots on an 1861 map of Leeds County.

As the community developed, a business centre grew up. There was a tannery, mills, black-smithy and store. When the Brockville and Ottawa Railway was built, Bellamy’s Station became a forwarding point for goods. There was also a post office that was burned around 1920. The post office was never re-opened after the fire

By 1890 a carriage and buggy shop was operating at Linden Bank. By this time Col. Checkley had arrived and put the name “Linden Bank” on the map.

The first children of the area went to school in a crude log building, but in 1869 the farmers of the area constructed what became to be known as Marshall School. (Gosford School)

The school was built out of stone on a low knoll on Gosford Road probably 100 yards off the North Augusta Road.  After serving generations pf Linden Bank children the school was phased out by the school consolidation of the 1960’s.

The school itself was built on land donated by the Marshall Family. Several families of Marshalls lived in the area, running their farms and contributing to community life. The school had rough wooden benches and desks. It had only one room, in which all the grades were taught. It was designated as Elizabethtown SS No. 17. A plague over the doorway gave the date of construction as 1869. (Recorder and Times, Darling collection Book No3)

linden-bank-checkley-estate-darling-bk3-p140
Checkley Estate c1985
linden-bank-emma-mcbratney-1862-1924-he-darling-bk3p135
Emma McBratney Home 1862-1924 photo c1985
1-linden-bank
Current Township map of 2016 shows location of Linden Bank

 

Jellyby – A Forgotten Hamlet in Elizabethtown

Jellyby

Jellyby was named for the pioneer Jelly’s who settled these fertile fields back in the 1820’s, but just how and where elizabethtown-master-1861-62-map-2the letters “by” were added is unknown. John Jelly didn’t know but pointed out that early cartographers sometimes added a letter or two to place names to make them more distinctive. As far as anyone knows the post office called it Jellby, before that it was known as Jelly’s Crossing from the fact that the road crosses the railway tracks here.

Prior to 1860 local folk got their mail at North Augusta. In 1859 the Brockville and Ottawa railway line was completed from Brockville to Arnprior with a spur line from Smiths Falls to Perth. Railway stations and subsequently post offices sprang up along the line. Jellyby’s post office flourished for a century before being phased out around 1965. The railway station disappeared around the same time.

The first money any settler made on his newly acquired land in the dim distant days of this community’s past came from the sale of potash, old records of the John Jelly family indicate.

Settlers, who had to clear their land of scrub timber and bush before they could grow crops, produced tons of ashes from burning the wood. Settlers hauled their ashes to the potash factories along the St. Lawrence or to the small communities nearby. By 1820, ash potteries were running in Phillipsville operated by Patrick Burns; at Spencerville, where blacksmith John Miller ran the mill; at Addison, run by Harry Lewis; at Seeleys Bay at the Hartley Mill; at Escott operated by partners Joe Dowsley and Andrew Todd; in Brockville, conducted by Henry Jones. In the years 1820 to 1850 tons of Potash went down to Brockville from the Jellyby area. The industry in Leeds collapsed between 1860 and 1870 following discovery of huge potash mines in Europe. Although farmers found ready cash for their potash, housewives also put ashes to good use making soap.

The Jelly farm was bought by the Jelly Family in 1827, but the land on which the farm is located is older than that, the original deed shows that the first grant of land was made in 1802. The original John Jelly came here from Ireland in 1820, living first in the United States, then coming to Canada in 1826 and settling here the following year. He was accompanied by a brother William and a sister Anne. The first house was a single room log cabin built on the farm. As his family kept growing he kept adding rooms until the original home was the centre of a rambling structure housing up to 11 children. Of the 11 children only one son Robert would remain to carry on the 200 acre farm. In 1885 Robert Jelly constructed a two story brick house, tearing down the original homestead.

(Recorder and Times, Darling Collection Book 3)

In 1830 the first church in Jellby was erected and it was a Methodist Church. Most of the area residents were Anglican and they had to travel to Brockville where the closest Anglican Church was located. In 1864, St. James Anglican Church was opened to worshippers in Jellby. A pioneer Anglican missionary, Rev. John Stanhage, who was then in charge of mission development in the northern sections of Augusta and Elizabethtown became the first minister of this new church. The stain glass window came from England and was a gift from Rev. John Stanhage . The hands on the painted clock above the doorway read 10:29, people are not sure if this is in reference to a bible verse, or the time that services started (Toledo Library Archives)

Jellyby or Jellby- In researching this hamlet we have come across both spellings, and a sentence by someone that they never knew which was the correct spelling as Jellby was used by the old timers in the area.

 

elizabethtown-kitley-master-1800-map-2-copy
1-Early map showing the railroad and Jelly’s Station

 

jellyby-ruis-of-methodist-ch-darling-bk3p126
2-Ruins of Methodist Church c1985
jellyby-original-jelly-home-darling-bk3p128
3-Original Jelly Home c1985

 

4-Jelly’s Crossing at the foot of Joseph Pritchard’s garden

 

jellyby-st-james-ch-10649-jellyby-rd-july-2016-3
7-St. James Church 2016
jellybe-st-james-anglican-ch-toledo-library-2
5-St James Anglican Church photo 2016
jellyby-st-james-ch-10649-jellyby-rd-july-2016-4
6-Painted hands on clock above the door- photo 2016

 

 

jellyby-st-james-125-anniv-darling-bk3p123
9-125th Anniversary Service, St. James Church
jellyby-anglican-church-window
8-Stained Glass window at the front of the church
jellybe-st-james-anglican-ch-toledo-library-1
11-St. James Anglican Church interior
jellyby-st-james
12-St. James Church Interior

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

mrs-wm-jelly-90th-bday-2-55-620
13-Mrs. William Jelly Birthday – 1955
mrs-wm-jelly-90th-bday-3-55-620
15-Mrs. William Jelly’s 90th Birthday
mrs-wm-jelly-90th-bday-1-55-621
14-Mrs. William Jelly’s 90th Birthday

 

 

 

 

 

16-Pritchard Home on the Jellyby Road
17-J. Pritchard Home on the Jellyby Road
18-Joseph Prichard

Edna’s Scrapbook”

is a paperback book written by Edna B. Chant and was published in 1998. Edna Chant was a reported with the “Athens Reporter” for 23 years and she is the author of four books.

Her book, which is made up of news clippings from various sources, from which we have taken excerpts, gives us a glimpse into life in our area for over a hundred year period ending with stories from 1975.

While her book covers many areas of Leeds and Grenville we have only focused on the area within Elizabethtown-Kitley Township.

Jellyby

In Feb 1888 a post office was opened at Jellyby with Joseph Pritchard as postmaster. The community had been formerly known as Jelly’s Crossing.

July 31, 1933, during a very severe electrical storm Henry Barns at Jellby had eight cows killed and Harry Cooper, Rocksprings lost three horses. The lightning was the worst seen in some years.

On December 1, 1940 the Orchard Cheese Factory at Jellby was totally destroyed by fire with all contents.

The farm home of Lawrence McManus at Jellyby was burned on February 14, 1963. The family of three escaped in their night attire and bare feet and nothing was saved. Mr.McManus woke up coughing about 1:30 am and he woke his wife and called his 15 year old son they just barely escaped with their lives. The wind was blowing away from the cattle filled barns. The stone house known as the Tackaberry place was 103 years old.

On May 9, 1968 a garage and car owned by Alfred Adams at Jellyby burned. The owners son Hugh Adams received serious burns in the fire.

The Athens Reporter and County of Leeds Advertiser

Excerpts have been taken from this paper referencing the following hamlet for the years 1889, 1894 and 1895

 Nov 18, 1894 issue-

Glossville, Nov. 10-

Mrs. Henry Davis, of Jellyby, is a guest at Mrs. R. Barlow’s

Tuesday April 30, 1895 issue

Alfred Pepper moved to Jellyby, having leased Orchard Valley cheese factory for this season.

Tincap – A Hamlet in Elizabethtown

Tincap

The address ‘Tincap, Canada’ was familiar all over the British Empire, almost, wrote the postmaster in 1905, and elizabethtown-master-1861-62-map-6very often letters came here addressed Tincap from Ireland, England and the United States.

There are several stories how the village got its unusual name, though all agree the ‘old schoolhouse which sat on the brow of the hill near the highway boasted a cupola with a tin cap, and as this was the only building of note, Tincap seemed a very suggestive name. Another more fanciful version is that Colonel James Breakenridge who donated the land, furnished the local militia with ‘tin helmets (tin caps), during the War of 1812 and placed one on the school cupola which sparkled in the sun and could be seen for miles.

Located on a small hill (an ancient sand beach), Tincap became a strategic point during the War of 1812, when Squire Breakenridge, the County Lieutenant of the First Leeds Militia, built a stone fort to guard against sneak attack. It was a small building on the 4th Concession Road just west of the village, facing south towards Brockville, whence the expected invasion would come. He supplied the men with tin caps and drilled them with rifles, but Forsyth’s Raid never came this far north. It became an ammunition depot, a minor cog in the government machinery, getting supplies of ammunition throughout the district. It sat in ruins for many years, until it was torn down and the stone used for paving the road.

Tincap may be the oldest community in Elizabethtown as old as Lyn or Brockville. Tincap was planned on the Quebec map before the land was settled. It is located exactly halfway across the township, at the intersection of the 4th Concession Road and the Perth Road, the back of pioneer settlement. It occupies two lots (18 &19) and the Commons in between the narrow strip of clergy reserves that run up the centre of the township.

The industry of Tincap was a blacksmith shop owned by Peet Seleye (Seeley or variations) another legendary character.  He was a Connecticut Yankee, a U.E. Loyalist who arrived from Kingston a few years after the revolution with partners Enoch Knowlton and Stephen Smith.

Tincap was an appropriate locale for a temperance meeting, Tincap’s other industry seemed to have been taverns. There were two in the village itself, with a population of perhaps 50. Ezra Halladay of Brockville operated a frame inn at the intersection, which he sold to Orren DeWolfe. Around the corner in the valley was John Warren’s tavern.

By 1830 Tincap was a commercial site, the jumping off point for the back two-thirds of Elizabethtown.

The log school house was replaced by stone in 1850, which burned in 1894.

(Recorder and Times News Stories)

There’s not much to see in Tincap of its ancient history. There are a few old houses only. In 1908 the post office was moved here from Spring Valley and twenty years later D.A. Johnson installed the first gas station in the area. By then planes were barnstorming, including one which crashed in the fields east of the village, the beginnings of the Brockville airport.   (Elizabethtown: The Last of the Royal Townships by Alvyn Austin pub 2009)

tincap-geo-n-youngs-store-darling-bk3p205
George Youngs Store at Tincap

 

 

tincap-school-abt-1905-sf1317
Tincap School c1905
tincap-school-fair-c1930-sf1310
Tincap School Fair c1930

 

 

 

 

 

 

tincap-school-c1970-sf134
Tincap School c1970

“Edna’s Scrapbook”

is a paperback book written by Edna B. Chant and was published in 1998. Edna Chant was a reported with the “Athens Reporter” for 23 years and she is the author of four books.

Her book, which is made up of news clippings from various sources, from which we have taken excerpts, gives us a glimpse into life in our area for over a hundred year period ending with stories from 1975.

While her book covers many areas of Leeds and Grenville we have only focused on the area within Elizabethtown-Kitley Township.

Tincap

Cynthia Louise Lamb aged three years was burned to death at her home on September 23, 1851.

Burton Johnston of Tincap burned at Belleville, December 8, 1936

A 14 year old boy, Aubrey Boyd of Tincap was killed while ridding his bicycle near his home on July 17, 1965, when struck by a car. The driver of the car was Chuck Lawson of Athens who told police he didn’t see the boy in time to stop. What made the accident doubly sad was the fact that the boy’s brother, aged 16 years, was killed by a car less than 3 months before when knocked off his motorcycle. The accident indirectly triggered a second crash a few hours later, which sent five persons to hospital. They were relatives of the driver who struct the boy.

 

Greenbush – A Hamlet in Elizabethtown

Greenbush (Old’s Corners)

Origins

elizabethtown-master-1861-62-map-3
1- Map of 1861-62

The lure of a fresh spring in the Canadian wilderness led to the founding of this community. In 1790, an 18 year old immigrant, whose family tree could be traced back to France of the 16th Century trekked overland from his home in Andover, Massachusetts with his bride, and after a hazardous journey reached the future site of Greenbush.

His name was Jean (John) Saigon Blanchard. His bride was Abigail Waite born at Wickford, Rhode Island in 1767, the daughter of Rev. William Waite and his wife Mary Nichols Waite. The Blanchards reached Leeds County by way of Hartford, Conn., New York and Oswegatchie (Ogdensburg). They were ferried across the river to Maitland. At Maitland, young Blanchard was told by surveyors of “a beauty spot by a spring in the forest”. The surveyors supplied young Blanchard with a crude map and they headed north from what was later to be know as Brockville. They journeyed by covered wagon along a trail through what are now the hamlets of Forthton and Addison and east along a path through the forest. They found their spring at the rear of Lot 27 in the Eighth Concession of Elizabethtown. They later told relatives that it took “many days to clear a passage to the spring. We encountered many friendly Indians. They were friends indeed for there was no white man near or far.”

Before winter, John Blanchard had his home built and a stable ready for his oxen. They were 100 percent self supporting but had to subsist the first year on wild pigeon, wild game and fish.

greenbush-john-saigon-blanchard-and-bride-abigail-waite-darling-bk3p116
2-John Saigon Blanchard and his wife Abigail Waite

The name Greenbush was imported by the original settler, John Saigon Blanchard, in 1790, from his old family plantation in Massachusetts which was knows as Greenbush. When Blanchard carved out his homestead here he gave the area its name.

Truelove Manhard, who wed Lucy White was a pioneer tanner in Greenbush. The Manhards were wed on March 14, 1831 and settled in Greenbush. There Truelove launched the district’s first tannery and boot shop. The shop prospered and later Manhard put up a stone building to house his business. He subsequently sold his factory to James White a brother of Lucy. Lucy died July 19, 1843 and lies in the Greenbush Cemetery.

Moses Olds, United Empire Loyalists, had been granted land on the Rideau in 1804, but was dissatisfied with his holdings. So he sold his grant and moved to Greenbush following his friend John Blanchard.

Few people know that the idea for the famous Oldsmobile cars of the early part of the 1900’s probably originated here in Greenbush. Moses Olds settled here in 1804, one of his sons James born in 1828 moved to the United States around 1880, and 20 years later his son Ranson E. Olds built the first Oldsmobile. It is possible the idea for a horseless carriage was instilled in the Olds family by the success of the old time carriage makers who ran flourishing businesses here in the 1850’s.

The old Greenbush General Store was founded by John Blanchards son H.W. Blanchard in 1836, and since that time has seen a number of changes in ownership. The original building was burned about 115 years ago. The old general store sold a bit of everything that a rural community needed. The general store also acted as the Greenbush Post Office. The first Postmistress was Adelaide Blanchard Loverin. She was a great grand daughter of John Saigon Blanchard. The post office was phased out in the 1930’s after development of rural mail routes cut down on their usage. Very little money passed hands in the early days of the store. They took in produce for payment for goods. Wheat at 50¢ a bushel, oats for 20¢ a bushel, butter at 10¢ a pound and eggs at 6¢ a dozen. They also took in hemlock bark drawing it to Lyn where it was sold for $2. a chord. As a point of reference cows were worth about $12. each.

greenbush-store-toledo-library-2
3-Greenbush Store unknown date
greenbush-general-store-est-1836-darling-bk3p120
4-Greenbush Store c1985
greenbush-general-store-2009-photo-alvyn-austin
5-Greenbush General Store c2009

In 1861 Greenbush boasted Taylor’s Tannery, Connor’s Shoe Shop, a Black Smithy, General Store, Post Office, John White’s inn and hotel, Wesleyan Methodist Church; Flannigan’s Cooperage where barrels for arms were made, a sawmill, and Blanchard’s Carriage works.

greenbush-1861-62-map
6-Detailed Map of Greenbush 1861-62

 

 

 

 

A cheese factory was opened in 1863 with Daniel Blanchard as owner and cheese maker.

greenbush-cheese-factory-toledo-library-2
7-Greenbush Cheese Factory

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Greenbush became a temperance centre in the years 1843-45, and Squire Hiram White Blanchard organized a lodge of the Independent Order of Good Templars, a temperance society. He provided lodge rooms over the general store that he was operating.

School

The first school here was built in 1840 at the junction of the Addison-Rocksprings Road. The teacher was Sarah Taggart. The second teacher was Lucinda Keller, who boarded with her own parents and was paid a salary of $5. per month. In 1845 fire destroyed the school. A new school went up in 1848 and served the area until it was torn down in 1919. It was then replaced with a brick school which was used until phased out in the 1960’s. (for more information and photos see Greenbush – a one room schoolhouse in Elizabethtown)

(Recorder and Times, Darling Scrapbook Book 3)

greenbush-old-school-toledo-library
8-Old Greenbush School
greenbush-school-1941-1
9-Greenbush School 1941
greenbush-sch-teacher-lillian-pelton-1942-mack-digital
10-Lillian Pelton, School Teacher in 1942

Religion

Wesleyan Methodist Church- Construction of this church began in 1828 and it was completed in 1833. Services were held as early as 1931, before the floor was put in. The land however was not officially sold to the trustees until February 1842 by James Olds. The stone was quarried and donated by Sylvanus Keeler who settled in Concession 9 lots 23 and 24 in 1826. The church was built as a community church to be used by Methodists, Quakers and Bible Christians.

greenbush-methodist-ch-july-2016-2
12-Methodist Church – photo 2016
greenbush-methodist-ch-july-2016-1
11-Methodist Church – photo 2016

“Originally it looked like a New York meeting hall, with square windows top and bottom, which can be seen as soldier courses. Inside it had a raised pulpit and a three sided balcony and could seat over 300 people, more than the entire population. In the 1880’s it was modernized and ‘Gothicized’ with pointed windows and interior remodelling. The Greenbush congregation was active in the religious and temperance revivals of the 19th Century, and in the 1880’s had a significant role in the creation of Canada’s ‘Social Gospel’ which stressed human relations and helping the less fortunate. The preacher was Salem Bond, a young ‘heretic’ who had been ‘rusticated’ by the Methodist Church and sent to Elizabethtown to think about his sins. Instead he wrote : The New Christianity. In 1967, the United Church closed hundreds of small rural churches throughout Canada. The Greenbush Church was closed for ten years until it was sold into private hands” (Elizabethtown: The Last of the Royal Townships, by Alvyn Austin pub 2009)

 

13-Methodist Church in Greenbush- undated photo

Cemetery

greenbush-cemetery-by-b-4
14-Greenbush Cemetery c 2010

The old Greenbush Cemetery last used for internments in the early 1950’s was established more than 150 years ago. Surveyor Henry Little laid out the burial ground with its 66 plots at the request of Daniel Blanchard, descendant of the pioneers who settled Greenbush.(for more information and photos see Cemeteries in Elizabethtown – Greenbush)

 

 

Greenbush is located at the intersection of County Road 7 and where the Greenbush and Jellyby Roads meet

 

greenbush-sawmill-1900-darling-bk3p121
16-Saw Mill c1900
greenbush-sawmill-early-1900s-daring-bk3p115
15-Sawmill workers early 1900’s
greenbush-sawmill-1900-darling-bk3p119
17-Sawmill Workers in the winter early 1900’s

 

greenbush-blacksmith-and-cheese-factory-on-rt-church-left-darling-bk3p116
19-Location of Blacksmith Shop and Cheese Factory on the left
greenbush-filing-corn-silo-1904-darling-bk3p115
18-Filling corn silo c1904
greenbush-horton-home-built-1850-darling-bk3p119
21-Horton Home built in 1850 photo c1985
greenbush-hewitts-blacksmith-shop-toledo-library-2
20-Hewitt’s Blacksmith Shop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

inquest-grenbush-tbt-feb-3-1905
23-The Brockville Times Feb 3, 1905
inquest-greenbush-tbt-feb-7-1905
22-The Brockville Times, February 7, 1905

 

 

 

 

The White’s of Greenbush

After farming and establishing the Hamlet of White’s Corners, the descendants of James White and Anna Pearson moved to Greenbush

24-Wedding photo of William Henry White and Florence Pritchard

 

25-Wedding photo of William Henry White and Florence Pritchard

 

26-William Henry White

 

27-William Henry and son JH Archie White

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

28-White Home on Lot 20, Concession 8 in Greenbush
29-White Home- Lot 20, Concession 8, Greenbush

 

30-Rebecca Pritchard with Norman and Florence

 

 

 

 

 

 

31-Florence Pritchard White

 

 

 

 

 

34-Rebecca Pritchard

 

 

32-Rebecca Pritchard
33-Rebecca Pritchard’s candlestick now in possession of her descendant Robert White

 

 

35-William Henry White, Florence Pritchard and Friends

 

36-Florence White

 

37-Rachel Pritchard and Fred Blanchard sons Harold and Donald

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

38-Off to Church
40-J.H. Archie White
39-J.H. Archie White

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

41-J.H. Archie White 1911-1994

 

 

humour-greenbush-1917-06-16-p31b
42-Postcard for Greenbush

 

“Edna’s Scrapbook”

is a paperback book written by Edna B. Chant and was published in 1998. Edna Chant was a reported with the “Athens Reporter” for 23 years and she is the author of four books.

Her book, which is made up of news clippings from various sources, from which we have taken excerpts, gives us a glimpse into life in our area for over a hundred year period ending with stories from 1975.

While her book covers many areas of Leeds and Grenville we have only focused on the area within Elizabethtown-Kitley Township.

Greenbush

The Greenbush United Church was built in built in 1833. James Olds a Quaker donated the land; John Keller, a son of Rev. Sylvanus Keller, quarried the stone for the church and drew it to the site. When first built, the church had galleries on each side and had 21 windows. In 1886 the galleries were taken down, and the windows reduced to ten. An adjoining hall was also built in that year. The Quakers as well as the Methodists used the church. When the 50th Anniversary was observed in 1883, the minister was Rev. Dr. Salem Bland. And at the 100th year observance, the minister was Rev. R.H. Whiteside. In 1925 the United Church of Canada took over and the church remained active for many years, until 1969 when it was closed, and the majority of the congregation transferred to Addison United Church.

The first school in Greenbush was built of logs in 1835. The first teacher was Miss. Sarah Taggart, a sister of Rev. Charles Taggart, the minister of the Methodist Church. The second teacher was Miss. Lucinda Keller who was paid $5. a month. In 1843 and 1844 the teacher was Miss. Orpha Ellmore. She was called the Temperance teacher as she hated liquor, and spent some time each day instructing her pupils on the evils of drink. In 1845 the school ws burned and there was no school for two months until the upper flat of the grocery store was fixed up for her classes and Adaline Kilborne was hired to teach. The next year school was held in a house owned by A. Root, and the first male teacher W. Landon was hired. He only stayed three months and later a house owned by W.G. Olds was used as a school with Miss Allison of Augusta as a teacher. In 1848 a stone school was built on the site of the first school. Dward Barry was the stone mason and Sam Prey was the carpenter.

A grand picnic for the Olds and Blanchard families and their relatives was held at Greenbush on July 12, 1901 with 92 persons present. The weather was perfect and the table fairly groaned with food. Some came from New York State and Michigan. These are descendants of John and Aaron Blanchard  and Moses Olds who came to Canada from Vermont in 1787. By honesty and industry, both families have prospered and all own property and have comfortable homes. All are staunch temperance people and teetotallers. Some of the Blanchard’s belong to the Society of Friends and most of the Olds are Methodists. James Olds donated the land for the Greenbush Methodist Church and helped to build it.

A raging fire fed by strong winds destroyed J.W. Hanna’s sawmill, shingle mill and box factory at Greenbush on March 22, 1906 at 10pm. Nothing was saved. Also lost was 2,500 feet of lumber, 200 apple boxes, 300 cheese boxes, 900 bushel measures, 5,000 cedar shingles, all ordered and ready to ship as well as all the machinery. Mr. Hanna had no insurance. Over 1,000 logs in the yard were not harmed. Mr.Hanna says he will rebuild. A collection is being raised which already amounts to $200.

Alba Roots Mill at Greenbush burned April 18, 1906.

On April 17, 1915 three young me from Greenbush went fishing in Mud Creek. They were Norman Connell and his brother Wesley, and William Fitzgerald. They fished for a while with no success and Norman said he was going further up the creek in an old boat pulled up on the shore. He went in spite of his friends warnings that the boat was not safe. After he had gone out of sight they heard hi shout, and they ran along the bank trying to see him. But their calls were not answered and they ran home for help. His body was found the next day.

On February 15, 1958 a large barn on Harold Hall’s farm at Greenbush was destroyed by fire of unknown origin. Lost in the flames were 25 Holstein cows, 30 pigs and 3 calves, also several cats. Six heifers in a building near the barn were saved.

On August 17, 1959 Steven James McIntyre, 11, of Greenbush was killed in a tractor accident.

On September 1, 1964 a machine shed operated on the farm of Omer and Allan Kilborn at Greenbush was burned. The shed was full of farm machinery and all was lost. The Elizabethtown Volunteer Fire Department was able to save the Coville home nearby he cause of the fire is not known.

A large barn and stable on the farm of Herb Vogel at Greenbush was burned on January 26, 1969. All the milking cows were driven out into the cold with difficulty, but a few head of young cattle and calves were lost. It was 14 below zero at the time. Elizabethtown firefighters fought the blaze for several hours as the large quantity of hay took a long time to burn.

An 18 year old youth Michael Berniques was killed on the Greenbush Road just off Highway 29 on April 28, 1969 when a timber jack he was operating overturned, pinning him underneath it, crushing him to death. He was engaged in the clearing operations for the new Golden Triangle Trap and Skeet Club.

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Jack Graham and their 14 year old son Mansell at Greenbush was burned to the ground on November 24, 1969. The owner of the house was Red Scott of Athens.

On August 20, 1970 a large stone farmhouse at Greenbush was burned after it was struck by lightening. The home was a landmark known as the Welt Davis place and was owned by Paul Foster. Two fire departments from Elizabethtown and Kitley fought the fire in a loosing battle.

Gosford – A Forgotten Hamlet in Elizabethtown

Gosford

This old community, lying in both Elizabethtown and Augusta Townships is reached by the Gosford Road which elizabethtown-master-1861-62-map-2leads off the Brockville-North Augusta road eight miles northeast of Brockville.

The early history of this old Elizabethtown township community has been lost in the mists of time, but it is known that settlers were living here by the year 1800.

Old Gosford Cemetery was established by these pioneers but first burials have not been recorded. In fact the cemetery itself was not registered with the Land Registry Office in Brockville until 1865, some 65 years after the first internment took place.

The name of Gosford is probably taken from the village of Gosford in Ireland. The Champan family, long prominent in Gosford affairs, first appears in the records in 1812. In that year Irish emigrant, William Chapman, took possession of Lot 3, Seventh Concession of Elizabethtown. Chapman received a grant of 200 acres of Crown Land, located on the south side of the Eighth Concession Road. Chapman built a log cabin and cleared his land. Other settlers in the area were also clearing their acres of brush, and building homes.

The homes were connected by wagon trails, since there was at that time no recognizable road in the area. The wagon trails branched off from the Brockville-North Augusta Trail. In time, Concession Road Eight was constructed, and a log bridge replaced the ford which the inhabitants used to cross the creek running through Gosford.

The little Methodist Church in Gosford was built by Nicholas Burns in 1865. Nicholas Burns was born in Dublin, Ireland and as a lad of 19 migrated to Canada in 1820. He settled at Lamb’s Pond in Elizabethtown Township and when a community was developed there he was instrumental in renaming the hamlet “New Dublin”, obviously in honour of his own birthplace. Burns did not remain long in New Dublin, for history records that he established his permanent home on Gosford Road, east of the community know as Gosford about 1822.

Burns built up a prosperous homestead and was a highly respected citizen of the community until his death in 1884.

The Methodist Church he built occupies part of Lot 3 in the Seventh Concession of Elizabethtown. The church was built of stone quarried in the vicinity and then covered with rough cast. Land for the church and cemetery was donated by Aaron Healy and his wife Martha, the Healy’s were paid one dollar for the land. During the war years, the church went through rough times. Soldiers stationed at the nearby Landon Farm caused considerable destruction to the old house of worship. They damaged the organ beyond repair, broke windows and roughed up the furniture. The church deteriorated, the roof leaked, birds built nests in the rafters and grass in the cemetery grew into hay. In 1973 repairs were made to the church and the cemetery was cleaned up by willing volunteers.

Gosford’s old post office was located at the intersection of the North Augusta and Gosford Roads. It was known as Linden Bank Post Office, being located about a mile from the community of the same name.

(Recorder and Times, Darling Scrapbook No.3)

gossford-cemetery-july-2016-2
Gosford Cemetery photo 2016
gosford-cemetery-july-2016-4
Gosford Cemetery photo 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

gosford-methodist-church-8838-gosford-rd-july-2016-9
Gosford Methodist Church photo July 2016
gosford-methodist-church-8838-gosford-rd-july-2016-10
Gosford Church erected AD 1865
gosford-methodist-church-8838-gosford-rd-july-2016-5
Interior of Church July 2016
gosford-methodist-church-8838-gosford-rd-july-2016-7
Interior of Church July 2016
gosford-methodist-church-8838-gosford-rd-july-2016-2
Gosford Church next to the cemetery July 2016

 

 

gosford-chapman-house-buit-1900-darling-bk3p93
Chapman House Built 1900
gosford-marshall-school-ss17-8808-gosford-rd-july-2016-1
Gosford-Marshall School SS 17, photo July 2016
gosford-nicholas-burns-home-built-c1862-darling-bk3p101
Nicholas Burns Home built c1862 photo c1985

 

 

 

 

Elizabethtown-Kitley Fire Department

“Edna’s Scrapbook”

is a paperback book written by Edna B. Chant and was published in 1998. Edna Chant was a reported with the “Athens Reporter” for 23 years and she is the author of four books.

Her book, which is made up of news clippings from various sources, from which we have taken excerpts, gives us a glimpse into life in our area for over a hundred year period ending with stories from 1975.

While her book covers many areas of Leeds and Grenville we have only focused on the area within Elizabethtown-Kitley Township.

 

Elizabethtown Fire Department

The Eizabethtown Volunteer Fire Department based at Lyn has an interesting history showing what a group of citizens can do if they put their minds to it. The project of forming a fire department was proposed at a meeting of the Lyn Community Club and on March 18, 1963 a meeting was held at the home of Arnold Ladd at which five men were appointed to form a committee to be the future Fire Department slate of officers. They were Arnold Ladd, chairman; Ivan Cross, Herb Simpson, Gerald Coon, Elton Tennant. In April a public meeting was held in the Lyn School when 24 men signed up offering their services as firefighters. The Township Council accepted these names proposed and approved the appointment of David McCrady as Fire Chief. Meetings were held every two weeks and many ways to make money were used such as dances, raffles and an auction sale. The first item of equipment purchased was a pumper truck on June 10, 1963 and they also got a 1957 oil tank and converted it to a water tank truck holding 1,300 gallons of water. The Township Council gave $1000. to purchase equipment and Fire Chief McCrady donated the land, the Township Council bought the material and the fireman did the work and a fire hall was erected. In 1964 a panel truck was purchased and by 1967 they had a new station wagon, two Scott air packs, two portable pumps, 5000 feet of hose, extension ladders, coats, hats, rubber-boots, uniforms for 25 men and they sent 14 men to attend Fire College at Gravenhurst. On September 5, 1967 Fire Chef McCrady resigned and was replaced by Deputy Chief George Williams and Ivan Cross was appointed Deputy Chief. Elizabethtown Township is justly proud of their Fire Department which now has modern radio equipment and an enlarged fire hall with a kitchen.

On July 18, 1966 a circus sponsored by the Lyn Firefighters Association was greatly enjoyed by both adults and children alike. But they were given a thrill they will never forget when one of the trapeze artists fell 50 feet from a high bar to the ground below. No net was being used. Women screamed and men jumped to their feet when Carmen Del Molion, a Spanish artist was seen to fall. She lay motionless on the ground as circus attendants rushed to her aid. She was carried to her trailer where she was attended by a doctor. It was later announced that no bones were broken but she was badly bruised and shaken up.

 

Kitley Fire Department

A new Kitley Fire Hall at Frankville was officially opened on July 23, 1966. Reeve Charlie Sands was master of ceremonies. Present were Reeve Borden Hutchings of North Crosby; Reeve E.A. McGregor of Westport; Reeve Wally Heffernan of Rear of Younge and Escott and Reeve Edgar Bresse of Newboro as well as Warden Donald Ferguson, Reeve Ernest Miller, Front of Younge; Fire Chief Dave McCrady, Elizabethtown; Fire Chief Edgar Fagan, Smiths Falls; Fire Chief Robert Bell, Augusta, Fire Chief Gerald Wing, Westport; members of Kitley Fire Department are Fire Chief Gerald Moran, Deputy Fire Chief Gerald Sands, Captain’s Gerald Mercier and Ray Ireland.

 

lyns-1st-fire-hall
Lyn’s First Fire Hall

 

 

 

 

 

 

mack-stack-in-front-of-fire-hall-darling-bk1-p50
Mack Stack standing in front of Lyn’s first Fire Hall

 

 

 

1st-fire-hall-on-mill-st
The end of Lyn’s first fire hall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

eliz-fire-dept-c1963-wi-bk3p194
Elizabethtown Fire Department Building in Lyn c1963
lyn-fire-hall-1992-focus-on-district-lfb1
Elizabethtown Fire Department building in Lyn c 1992

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

lyn-fire-trucks-1993
Fire Trucks c1993
lyn-fire-truck-1971-rt-digital
Elizabethtown Fire Truck 1971
elizabethtown-fire-truck-1963
Elizabethtown Fire Truck 1963

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

d-white-g-williams-dmccrady
Chiefs D. White; G.Williams and D.McCrady
fire-hall-apr-1963
Fire Hall Meeting April 1963
fire-extrication-team-2005
Fire Extraction Team 2005
lyn-fire-dept-1993
Elizabethtown Fire Department Team 1993
lyn-fire-hall-1993
Lyn Fire Hall in 1993
chief-geo-williams
Chief George Williams
lyn-firefighters-c1968
Firefighters c1968, Reeve Don Ferguson in the middle

 

 

 

 

 

 

img026
Everything’s here except the phone number

 

img023
Elizabethtown Firefighters c 2000

 

main-st-miller-store-fire-sep-1990-wb1-1
Miller’s Store Fire Sept 1990, Main St in Lyn
main-st-miller-store-fire-sep-1990-wb1-2
Miller’s Store Fire
main-st-miller-store-fire-sep-1990-wb1-3
Miller’s Store Fire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

vanlterson-house-fire-howard-rd-1974
Vanlterson House Fire on the Howard Road 1974
watson-res-lyn-jan-29-1957
Watso Residence Fire, Lyn Jan 29, 1957
img014
Unknown Structure Fire
Fire of Ida Kane’s House at the Corner of Laura and Church Sts., Lyn. Pictured is Louis Kane, girl is unknown. Photo c1955

 

Edna’s Scrapbook – News Stories of Elizabethtown

“Edna’s Scrapbook”

is a paperback book written by Edna B. Chant and was published in 1998. Edna Chant was a reported with the “Athens Reporter” for 23 years and she is the author of four books.

Her book, which is made up of news clippings from various sources, from which we have taken excerpts, gives us a glimpse into life in our area for over a hundred year period ending with stories from 1975.

While her book covers many areas of Leeds and Grenville we have only focused on the area within Elizabethtown-Kitley Township.

Elizabethtown

On June 18, 1888 a man named Laughlin was hunting woodchucks on the farm of Frank McCrae near Brockville when he came across the body of a man. He told some chums about it, but they wouldn’t believe him until they went to look for themselves. They then told their parents and the police were called. But by this time it was dark, and they decided to wait until morning. At 7am they went to investigate with the boys leading the way. As they drew near, they were met by a terrible stench. The body was that of a man about 40 years of age in a sitting position with a leather strap wrapped tightly around his neck. It wasn’t possible that he could have hung himself, as the other end of the strap wasn’t attached to anything. His hair and whiskers had fallen off and the flesh was gone from his hands. He was well dressed in a blue suit and black overcoat and his shoes were shinny new rubbers. A document in his pocket gave his name as Hans Christianson, but no address. Police later learned that a man by that name had boarded at the home of Mr. Shipman on Pearl Street in Brockville. He was a good natured Swede, six feet tall and said he worked on the B&W Railway. Police were unable to trace any relatives. (This was west of Brockville by Grants Creek)

On March 21, 1900 a family was discovered near Brockville, living in the utmost squalor. The father, mother, grandmother and eight children were living in a shack 10 feet by 15 feet. The only bedding they had were feed bags stolen from a farm. Their main meal was a soup made from boiling hay in water. The filth was terrible and all were infected by lice. They had no shoes and very little clothing. The father was taken to Brockville jail and the grandmother to the old folks’ home at Athens. Arrangements were made to find homes for the children, but when the constable went to get them, the grandmother hit him over the head with a stick of wood, inflicting a nasty wound, and he said he would never go back. It is said that when the children were washed and dressed, they were all good looking. The mother was given a job washing dishes at a hotel. The case made quite a stir in Brockville. No one can imagine how they survived the winter.

Lewis Darling aged 14 years was fatally shot at Butternut Bay on Oct 14, 1903.

While picking flowers at Fernbank a Brockville woman found a shoe box tied with string. Curiosity got the better of her and she opened it. She was horrified to find the body of a baby inside. Police were notified and their investigation disclosed that the baby had died at birth in February and the father took it into the woods to bury it, but the ground was frozen too hard so he left it on top of the ground and covered it with snow, intending to go back in the spring to bury it. When asked by the judge why he didn’t do so, he replied that he “hadn’t gotten around to it.”

On September 25, 1905 Lena Gill, 8, was found dead in a swamp near Brockville.

On September 4, 1919 Carmen Bresee, two year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Bresee, was drowned in a water tank in their farmyard. The child was only missed for a few minutes, but all efforts to revive him were in vain. (Bresee Farm was located on an old side road west of Grant’s Creek)

The two storey home of Mr. and Ms. Walter Hodge and their three children Gary, 9, Terry, 7, and Larry 1 ½ years was burned on February 14, 1963. The home on the Halleck’s Road was a complete loss with all contents. Mrs. Hodge was at work, the baby at a sitter, the other children at school. Mr.Hodge a night worker was asleep when he was awakened by a roar of the flames. He phoned a neighbour to bring a ladder as he was trapped by the fire, but by the time they arrived with the ladder he had jumped from an upstairs window into a snow bank.

On February 14, 1963 fire destroyed the home of Mr. and Mrs. Jebbel Vanderveld at Sharpe’s Lane, Brockville. The couple and their ten children were left homeless and only a few possessions were saved. The family was seated at lunch when a neighbour, Nancy Gates ran in to tell them the upper story of the house as on fire.

A well equipped garage owned by a car dealer Ben Foley at Long Beach on No. 2 Highway was burned on March 19, 1963. A new Thunderbird was lost as well as a lot of tools and equipment.

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Roosevelt Shipman was burned on December 14, 1964 on Highway 2 at Long Beach. Homeless are Mr. and Mrs. Shipman, their son Borden, a widower and his three children ten, six and four. Mr. and Mrs. Shipman were at work and Borden who works nights saw his two eldest children off to school and went back to bed. He was awakened by the cries of his son, and had to escape the flames by crawling out a window to the porch roof from where they were rescued. Nothing was saved.

A frame bungalow on the Tincap- Fairfield east road owned by Mr. and Ms. Clarence Gardiner was burned in 1964. Mr. Gardiner was visiting his wife and infant daughter at the Brockville General Hospital and their two children Theresa, 4, and Cheryl, 2, were with their grandmother, Mrs. Roy Gardiner across the road. Nothing was saved from the home.

Raymond Willie, 22, was killed by a train at Halleck’s Crossing March 27, 1966.

The Cirtwell Auto Parts building on No.2 Highway at Halleck’s Road was burned on February 2, 1967. Total loss was estimated at $40,000.

On July 11, 1967, Barbara Jan Durham aged 10 was drowned in a quarry on Howard Road near Lyn. Her home was at Heuvelton, NY.

Barry Arnold Slate, 19, of Brockville was killed on June 2, 1968 when a car in which he was a passenger crashed into a rock cut on the Lyn Road near Burnbrae Farm. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Edson Slate of Brockville.

Mrs. Margaret June Shannon, 29, of Sharpe’s Lane was fatally injured when struck by a car near her home on March 11, 1969. She was walking with a friend Mrs. Barbara Kirby when the car ran her down. The car did not stop and was later found to have been stolen from Ottawa that afternoon. Mrs. Shannon died in hospital three hours after she was struck. She is survived by two sons, Stephen 10, and Kevin, 8, her husband Ronald, her parents Mr. and Mrs. Herman Leizert, three sisters and seven brothers.

The Eskay Henderson Printing Shop at Long Beach was destroyed by fire on January 11, 1970. Loss estimated at $20,000. was only partially covered by insurance,

 

Edna’s Scrapbook – News Stories of Lyn

“Edna’s Scrapbook”

is a paperback book written by Edna B. Chant and was published in 1998. Edna Chant was a reported with the “Athens Reporter” for 23 years and she is the author of four books.

Her book, which is made up of news clippings from various sources, from which we have taken excerpts, gives us a glimpse into life in our area for over a hundred year period ending with stories from 1975.

While her book covers many areas of Leeds and Grenville we have only focused on the area within Elizabethtown-Kitley Township.

Lyn

The body of a German Frederick Thuenbeer was found on the farm of William Brown two miles west of Lyn on Dec 3, 1859.

An old man of Lyn who had been living alone since the death of his wife had lately been showing signs of insanity, but was considered harmless. On July 21, 1890 he donned his old army uniform and carrying his musket he stopped every rig that came down the road, and made them turn around and go back. But finally, Mr. Stack of the Lyn House came along and he took the loaded gun away from him and took him into Brockville when he turned him over to the police. He was found to be hopelessly insane and could easily have killed someone.

The worst storm to hit the Leeds and Grenville area in many years took place on January 13, 1890. A great deal of damage was done and it seemed like a miracle that no lives were lost. The Lyn area was hit the hardest. The huge chimney on the woollen mill went down with a crash; the Methodist church blew down, all being left was the spire; roofs were carried away from 12 barns; the roofs blew off the Masonic Hall, the Oddfellows Hall and Taylor’s drug store, and over 50 large trees blew down.

The Eyre Manufacturing Co. at Lyn began operation on March 4, 1890 They have contracted to buy logs from area farmers, and arranged for the B&W to pick them up along the line They will make cheese boxes, hollow ware and measures. This will help farmers and also the railroad.

On January 19, 1895, little Joey Miller, son of Joseph Miller of Lyn, was drowned. He was paying on the ice near the flour mill and got into the flume and was carried underneath the ice. He was rescued in 30 minutes, but could not be revived. Mr. Miller lost another son by drowning seven years ago.

A shocking accident occurred on October 8th 1897 near Lyn. Charlie Moore was walking on the road carrying a double barrelled shotgun, when a neighbour Mr. DeWolfe stopped his rig and offered him a ride. He told Charlie to put the gun between them, but he said the gun was loaded and he might better put it in the back of the rig, which he did. When they reached Charlie’s home, he got out and attempted to remove the gun by pulling it out by the barrel. The gun discharged, blowing off Charlie’s arm. Mr. DeWolfe drove him three and a half miles to the office of Dr. Judson at Lyn with the stump of his arm hanging in shreds The doctor amputated the are at the shoulder at the hospital in Brockville after giving him first aid at the office. Charlie was very brave throughout the ordeal.

Albert Edgely of Lyn vouches for the truth of the following: In June 1898, he was planting corn when his wife called him for dinner. He folded the top of the bag of seeds over, and left it in the field while he ate. When he returned, two crows were holding the bag open, while a third crow ate the corn.

Benjamin Blake long resident of Lyn, who was working on the farm of David Condie near Smiths Falls, was gored to death by a bull on July 2, 1898.

A ten year old Lyn girl, Carrie McNish, was instantly killed by lightning on July 24, 1900. She was lying on a couch in the kitchen of her home, when the end of the house was struck. Her brother was knocked senseless for a time. Her mother had both her boots torn off. A sister, aged six threw water on the couch and her mother’s dress which were burning, and then ran through the rain to the butter factory to get her father. Dr. Judson was sent for to treat mother and son, but there was nothing he could do for Carrie.

Bernard Slack aged five years was drowned at Lyn on March 13, 1902.

On July 3, 1907 a sharp electric storm passed over the area. A large barn owned by Walter Lee of Lyn was struck and burned.

On April 23, 1910, Mrs. John Livingstone of Lyn met her death in an unusual manner. She had been enjoying good health and cooked dinner at noon. About 1pm her husband went to the village on business returning at 4 pm He found the door locked and the key under the mat. He unlocked the door and went in, and when he found that his wife had not come by five o’clock he went to the barn to look for her. Then he noticed the milk pail was gone and he had thought that she had gone to milk the cow. He later found the cow which had not been milked so he drove to the barn. Then he heard their collie dog barking near a small stream in another field. Here he found his wife laying face down in a couple of inches of water, the milk pail beside her. He carried her to a grassy knoll, but she appeared to be dead. An autopsy later revealed she had not drowned, but had apparently dropped dead when she stopped to dip up some water.

On November 20, 1910 William Neilson of Lyn, while deer hunting near Madawaska District, fell on a rocky shore and broke his leg. He lay for several hours until the hunting party found him. A splint was made out of saplings for his leg and he was carried more than two miles to the railroad. Here they flagged down the train and sent him to Brockville and the hospital there. It was a harrowing experience for all concerned.

A well known Lyn farmer Nathan Purvis was killed while walking on the tracks near the Lyn Junction. The body was badly mutilated. The accident happened August 29, 1912.

Joseph Robinson Reeve of Elizabethtown Township died at his home in Lyn on December 8, 1915. He was a valued member of Counties Council and highly regarded in the Township. He was born November 27, 1847 in the house where he died and was 68 years of age. His father John Robinson came to Canada from Yorkshire, England and established a valuable farm out of the virgin forest on what is now called Halleck’s Road. Joseph Robinson married Mary A. Davidson and they had four children, George, William, Nellie and May. For his second wife he married Rebecca Davidson who died 14 years ago. Joseph was buried in Fulford’s Cemetery on the river front.

On March 29, 1916 James Cummings of Lyn was killed by a train near Avondale Farm. (note this caused the now underpass on the Lyn Road to be built)

On January 12, 1918 Mr. William Struk was struck and killed by a snow plow on the Grand Trunk Railroad near Lyn. He was an Australian by birth and had been working as a section man for the past five years there was a blizzard at the time and visibility was very poor. He left a wife and family in Australia.

The old Last Factory at Lyn burned March 24 1924

Wilfred Parslow, 21, of Lyn was electrocuted on June 19, 1930 while digging a well in Athens. He was assisting Jack Brown and G. Adrian in sinking a well at the corner of Elgin and Wellington Streets and was holding an iron rod when it touched overhead hydro wires. He died instantly.

R.K.Kilmurry of Lyn was killed at Addison in a car crash.

On November 20, 1954 Mrs. Ernest Hanna of Lyn 51, died at a square dance at Delta.

Miss. Altha Pettem of Lyn killed at Toledo in a car accident March 2, 1955

On February 22, 1956 Nancy Ann Moore, 19, of Lyn District and Gerald Walker of Addison district were found dead in a car.

On June 18, 1957 two residents of Lyn were killed in a highway crash near Pickering. Cecil Wilfred Chant, age 39, and his niece Doris Helen Chant, age 18, were killed instantly. A double funeral was held with interment in Lyn Cemetery.

On January 8, 1958 the home of Peter Grendel near Lyn was burned in the early hours of the morning. The family was awakened by the roar of the flames and escaped in their night attire. The boys of the family aged 26, 18, 16 and 12 ran in and out several times and saved most of the furniture downstairs, but many valuable antiques from Holland were lost. Neighbours helped to save the outbuildings, 24 cows and 5 calves.

The farmhouse near Lyn known as the Casper Booth place was destroyed by fire on January 8, 1958. Tenants were Mr. and Mrs. Peter Grendel and their four children.

Mr. and Mrs. Hiram Jones of Lyn observed their 65th wedding anniversary o May 25, 1961. They were married on May 25, 1896 in Lyn where they have spent most of their life. Mrs. Jones is the former Maude Latimer. They had three children: their son Carman died overseas during World War I, a daughter Edna died in 1954 and one daughter Muriel Chisamore lives at Young Mills.

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Ladd of Lyn was badly damaged by fire on August 12, 1962

On March 28, 1963 Charles Wilfred Hendry, 61, Lyn farmer, suffered a heart attack and died in a field after chasing a run away tractor from which he had fallen.

The home of Mr and Mrs Claude Wilson of Lyn was burned with all its contents on January 31, 1964. Mr. Wilson was at work at Armstrong Motors and Mrs. Wilson was at work at Wrightway Laundry, four children were at school and two were at their grandmother’s when the fire broke out. The Lyn Volunteer Department fought the flames.

A seven year old boy Allan Davis son of Mrs. Eileen Davis of Kilkenny Street, near Lyn lost his life when fire destroyed their home on March 10, 1964. Mrs. Davis was awakened by smoke about 1:30 am and called her two sons Allan and Louis and then ran to awaken her three daughters Betty, 15, Gloria 13, and Barbara 9. By this time the smoke was so thick they couldn’t find the stairs and they were helped out by a border, Charles Kane who slept downstairs. It wasn’t until they were all out that they missed Allan, but it was too late to go back in as the roof collapsed. They made their way to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Kavanaugh who owned the house. They cared for the shivering family and called the Lyn Fire Department. The pumper became stuck in the deep snow on the way, but they couldn’t have rescued the child anyway as the house was an inferno. It is thought that the fire started from a wood burning stove.

A well known Bellamy Construction worker, 52 year old Gordon Percy Campbell was crushed to death under tons of sand at the Lyn Gravel Pit on September 9, 1964. He had been employed by the Cardinal Construction Co. for the past two years. His fellow workmen thought he had gone home, but when they discovered his lunch pail was still full they called police. Digging was started immediately and his body was found. He was unmarried and is survived by one sister and six brothers.

On January 17, 1965 a young Lyn boy, Maxwell Hubert Kelly, age seven years, was accidentally hanged when the hood of his parka caught on the branches of a tree near his home. Three men driving by saw the boy and stopped to investigate. The child was hanging eight feet above the ground. They lifted the boy down and took him home where his parents called an ambulance, the child’s father applying mouth to mouth resuscitation. A team of three doctors tried in vain to save him. He was a son of Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Kelly.

Fire destroyed an old Lyn landmark on September 19, 1965 when the old grist mill built in 1838 was burned. At the time it was built, Lyn was known as Coleman’s Corners. In later years it became the post office and store owned by Joshua Lillie and still later by Mort Gardiner, Omar Mallory and Walter Billings. It was later sold to Ken Bolton and again by Blake Mott. At the time of the fire the owner was Charles Short. (Note this is the original mill on Main Street next to the bywash)

On October 25, 1965 damage totalling $15,000. was done by a fire to an old stone house near Lyn. The house was a landmark over 100 years old known as “The Darling Place”. It was owned by Jack Darling and had always been in the Darling family. The fire started from a woodstove and pipes in the kitchen. The fire touched off a series of events long to be remembered by Lyn Firefighters. Hey were called at 3pm and on arrival found the kitchen on fire and the garage also half burned. Under mutual aid they called Augusta to send a tank truck as they were short of water. Augusta sent a truck driven by Deputy Fire Chief Theo Baas and on the 3rd Concession Road the vehicle went out of control, rolled over several times and ended up wrecked in a deep rocky ditch. It was carrying 1,000 gallons of water. Members of Front of Yonge Fire Department were called and Brockville sent 500 gallons of water. By the time the fire was out, upwards of 50 men had been involved including area farmers who drew water in milk cans. There were no injuries. Mr. and Mrs. Darling and two young children were in Brockville at the time.

A young resident of Forthton, Ronald Chant, 21, was drowned in Lyn quarry on August 7, 1967. He had been swimming with other friends across the quarry when he seemed to tire suddenly and called for help. When friends reached him he disappeared. It took firemen and police almost an hour to recover the body. He was the only son of Mrs. Hazel Chant and the late Cecil Chant. He was employed at the Johnston Shoe Company in Brockville.

A disastrous fire at Lyn on May 11, 1968 destroyed the barns of Harry Anderson with 41 head of choice Holstein cows, equipment and 2000 bales of hay.

Mrs. George A. Wright of Brockville entertained 100 guests at her home, 22 Sherwood St., Brockville on April 20, 1969 on the occasion of her 95th birthday. She was the former Lillian Billings, a daughter of the late Marble Billings and his wife Ruth Kilbourn and was born at Lyn April 20, 1874. She had been known as “Aunt Lil” to countless friends through the years. She was married in 1897 to George A. Wright whose family operated the Robert Wright Company in Brockville. He later became Magistrate Wright presiding over local courts for many years. He died on August 10, 1954 aged 80. Although “Aunt Lil” appeared in excellent health for her birthday, she died less that five months later on September 6, 1969.

On July 13, 1970 a triple drowning at the Lyn pool shocked the area. Drowned were Gary Irvine Davis, 26 of RR4, Brockville; David Robert McKay, 20, of RR4, Brockville and Barbara Lee McKay, 18, of 18 Delhi Street, Brockville. Katherine McClintock, 12, saw the drowning and said the three were on a raft about 35 feet from the shore when they jumped off and started to swim to shore. One man grabbed the girl, the girl called out for help and the other man stopped to help and then all three disappeared. An inquest was held and a five man jury ruled the drowning accidental. It is believed that Miss. McKay got into difficulty and the two boys were drowned trying to help her.

Louis Pilon, aged 16 of Lyn was killed and five other youths injured on December 9, 1967, when their car crashed on the icy Howard Road as they were returning from a hockey match in Brockville. Pilon’s death was instant and the car was reduced to a piece of junk. The other five boys, David Pilon, 21, the driver; Alvin Massey, 15; Wayne Massey, 17; Larry and Lorne O’Toole were sent to hospital with cuts and fractures.

 

St. Philip Neri RC, Old Cemetery

St. Philip Neri Roman Catholic Cemetery, Toledo

Old Cemetery: west from Toledo to King Rd., to Lake Eloida Rd.

 

st-philip-niri-old-cemetery-5
Photo taken November 2016
st-philip-niri-old-cemetery-14
Photo taken November 2016
st-philip-niri-old-cemetery-3
Photo taken November 2016
st-philip-niri-old-cemetery-4
Photo taken November 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

st-philip-niri-old-cemetery-2
Looking towards the hill where the first Roman Catholic Church was built

 

st-philip-niri-old-cemetery-10
Memorial to the first church
st-philip-niri-old-cemetery-9
Etching of the first St. Philip Neri Church 1840-1907

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

st-philip-niri-old-cemetery-1
Pray for the soul of Thomas OHora who died Oct 27, 1858 aged 75 years
st-philip-niri-old-cemetery-16
Pray for the soul of Michael Dempsey died Nov 27 1868 aged 48 yrs also his son John N. died Oct 5, 1874 aged 25 yrs

St. Philip Neri, RC Cemetery

St. Philip Neri Roman Catholic Cemetery, Toledo

This is the new cemetery, Across the road (Hwy 8) from old cemetery, take road on the left or right to cemetery.

 

st-philip-neri-new-cemetery-2
View of Cemetery from the Old Cemetery across the highway- Photo November 2016
st-philip-neri-new-cemetery-1
Photo taken November 2016
st-philip-neri-new-cemetery-3
Photo taken November 2016
st-philip-neri-new-cemetery-5
Photo taken November 2016
st-philip-neri-new-cemetery-4
Photo taken November 2016

Lehigh Cemetery

Lehigh Cemetery

Concession 10, Lot 22, Twp of Elizabethtown Kitley*, GPS: 44.707355, -75.952617- Hwy 29 to Line Road 9 turn west south side of road. One mile south of Frankville on the Leigh Cemetery Road. (all photos taken November 2016)

 

 

lehigh-cemetery-6
Looking south- November 2016
lehigh-cemetery-3
Looking north- November 2016
lehigh-cemetery-21
Looking towards the main gate- November 2016
lehigh-cemetery-7
Photo taken November 2016
lehigh-cemetery-22
Photo taken November 2016
lehigh-cemetery-17
Photo taken November 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

lehigh-cemetery-16
In Memory of Lydia Cornell who died Jan 21, 1856 age 94 years of the late Seth Cornell (L)- Delorma Leehy on the right, see monument below

 

 

 

lehigh-cemetery-19
Erected in memory of Madora C., Daughter of Nelson & Abigail Leehy who died May 10, 1852 age 2 mo
lehigh-cemetery-20
in Memory of Delorma, son of Gideon & Clarrissa Leehy, died June 7, 1843 in the 18 year of his age
lehigh-cemetery-14
Eva M., Daughter of Franklin & Frances Lehigh, Born Sep 15, 1866 died Sep 21, 1874
lehigh-cemetery-15
Henry A. Kilborn, M.D. died Sep 8, 1873 age 26 years
lehigh-cemetery-18
Erected in the memory of Clarrissa G., daughter of Nelson & Abigal Leehy who died Feb 19, 1854 age 1 yr & 20 days
lehigh-cemetery-12
Kilborn
lehigh-cemetery-10
In Memory of Elizabeth wife of Robert Johnston who died Oct 10, 1855 in her 70 year of age
lehigh-cemetery-9
In memory of Mary Johnston who died Sep 30, 1847 in the 25 year of her age
lehigh-cemetery-8
Elizabeth Johnston (L) and Mary Johnston (R)
lehigh-cemetery-10
In Memory of Elizabeth wife of Robert Johnston who died Oct 10, 1858 in her 70 year of age
lehigh-cemetery-13
Horatio Nelson Lehigh 1828-1914 his wife Abigail Blackmer 1833-1904
lehigh-cemetery-4
McCrea Monument
lehigh-cemetery-5
Hiram McCrea born July 2, 1809 died Apr 7,1888 also his wife Heldha Wyatt born Mar 11, 1811 died Apr 15, 1879
lehigh-cemetery-1
Henry Rolston Crummy 1858-1936 and Idela Elora Abels 1860-1916
lehigh-cemetery-11
Farrah Monuments

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soper’s School – A One Room Schoolhouse in Kitley

Soper’s School

(Otterman’s School)

 School Section No. 13

 

sopers-school-house-1861-62-map
School location on map of 1861-62

Concession #9, Lot 12, built 1850 (see map)

The origins of the original Soper School have been lost in the sands of time. It was probably a log cabin school and existed on the site as early as 1820. This original one room school was known as Otterman’s School, from the Otterman family living nearby. Later when Soper deeded the land over to the School Section board it became Soper School.

Levi Soper owned a homestead three miles to the east of Fankville. A school was built on part of this property. The school stands on the 9th Concession, but the road running past the school building is Morrison Road, Kitley 8th line. The school fence runs between the two concessions..

A stone building supplanted the original log school and it served the community until it was destroyed by fire in 1912. The present stone building was erected on the site in the same year. George Brundige was the contractor when the school was rebuilt. The building was constructed of square cut stone locally quarried. The inside was finished with a white plaster. A raised platform was installed for the teacher.

Among the first settlers around the old school site were the Morrisons, Wilkins, Pryces, Sopers, Wrights, Reynolds, Barringstons, Davises, Mulvaughs, Steacys, Hewitts, Hantons, Brundiges, Merciers. Later the Cooks and O’Gradys moved in.

Louise Mulvaugh was a teacher there prior to 1900. In the 1900’s teachers included Miss. Cocklin (1908), Miss. Greeves; Kenneth Blanchard, Miss. Clow, Misses Nellie and Rose Judge and Fred Leacock who later became a doctor and was killed in a car accident. First salaries paid to teachers ran from $200. to $300. per year. Average attendance was 25-30 pupils but when the school closed in the 1960’s attendance was down to 12. (Recorder and Times)

frankville-soper-school-c1985
Soper’s School c1985

 

 

soper-schoolhouse-2
Soper School November 2016
soper-schoolhouse-4
Soper School November 2016
soper-schoolhouse-8
Soper School -November 2016
soper-schoolhouse-12
Sign for Soper Road, school is across from the sign
soper-schoolhouse-9
Schoolhouse pump hidden in the brush on the corner of the lot

Shane’s School – A One Room Schoolhouse in Kitley

Shane’s School

School Section No. 2

 

shanes-school-1861-62-map
School location on map of 1861-62

Concession #1, Lot 9, in South Elmsley Township (see map)

In 1873, school trustees received the deed for a property of land from Henry Shane.

A new stone building was constructed in 1875, replacing an older school further down the road which was subject to arson, possibly committed by a pupil. The schoolhouse was used after hours as the community church, as well as a meeting hall. Well into the 1900s, the building was used by the Shane’s Women’s Institute.

Shane’s Corners was a small settlement located along Highway 29 near what was the First Concession of Kitley. Shane’s Corners was settled by a man named Lawrence Shane and his wife; Mrs. Shane kept a private school here at one time. The settlement consisted of a few homesteads and very few businesses. [2]

The settlement was large enough that it was able to become its own school section in the late nineteenth century. The school was known as S.S. #2 Shane’s School, and at the time was located along the boundary of Kitley and South Elmsley townships. [2]

Shane’s School enjoyed an upswing in attendance during the 1950’s, when more people moved into the area.

The old Shane’s Road running west from Shane’s Corners on No.29 highway forms the boundary between South Elmsley and Kitley.

Known as the Town Line, the road was a natural spot for school houses. Thus at least three were set up along its route, and because education knows no boundaries, these schools became union, uniting South Elmsley and Kitley pupils.

Shane’s School, still sitting in quite dignity on the knoll that marks the junction of Shane’s Road and No.29 Highway, was a union school with around 15 South Elmsley children attending it in 1840, though it was located in Kitley.

Halfway between Shane’s Corners and Blanchard’s Hill, another public school, also union existed in the 1840’s. It has since vanished and no historian today knows where it stood.

[2] Recorder and Times]

Rock Springs School – A One Room Schoolhouse in Kitley

Rock Springs School

(School Section # 19 – Kitley)

(School Section #25 – Elizabethtown)

rock-springs-school-1861-62-map
School Location on map of 1861-62

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: no report

1854: no report

 

If anyone has any information on this school we would appreciate hearing from you.

Redan School – A One Room Schoolhouse in Kitley

Redan School

(School Section #20 – Kitley)

reddan-school-1861-62-map
Location of school on map of 1861-62

(School Section # 26 – Elizabethtown)

 

Redan was settled in the years 1840-1860 by Irish Immigrants. The original inhabitants were the Youngs, the Marshalls, Burnetts, Pritchards, Motts, Richards and Wilsons. The old Richardson homestead here was originally part of a clergy reserve. In 1854 the government released all clergy reserve land to the public and the Richard family took a 100 acre plot in the centre of this community.

Redan School was located a short distance from the Mott homestead.  The original schoolhouse was a log structure located near the junction of the Rocksprings and Redan roads. The site is now covered by a swamp.

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: no report

1854: Frame building

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

That the request of the trustees of school section no 26 be excepted and that the sum of $125. be levied and collected on the rateable property for the current year 1862- 1862
that the application of the Trustees of School section No 26 be complied with and the sum of $80 be levied and collected on the rateable property of said School Section exclusive of all expenses-1871
that the application of the Trustees of School Section No 26 be complied with and the sum of $80 dollars be levied and collected on the Taxable property of said section exclusive of expenses-1872
that $36 dollars of Clergy money be divided amongst the School Sections of this Township in the following manner, namely Sections No 1 $10, No 12 $5, No 26 $9, No 27 $9.31 cents, No 28 $5, No 29 $2, No 30 $5, No 31 $6 bring union section all the full Sections will leave the sum of $13.11 cents each and the Clerk ? the sum to be paid to the Trustees of each School Section-1873[1]

[1] Lyn Museum Archives

Rathwell’s School – A One Room Schoolhouse in Kitley

Rathwell’s School

School Section #22

 (Wolford School Section No. 6)

 

rathwells-school-1861-62-map
Location on map from 1861-62

Concession #4, Lot 4 (see map)

After 1858 the school that was Wolford  SS#22 became Rathwell’s School, northeast corner of County Road 16 and Corkoran Road.

(Note: on the 1862-62 map there was no school at this location, the closest school we could find was the one circled on the map, this does not correspond to the present location of the school)

 

jasper-school-house-1
November 2016
jasper-school-house-4
November 2016
jasper-school-house-2
November 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rathwell School, photo by Hans-Ulrich Raffelt taken Sept. 2013

 

 

Newbliss School – A One Room Schoolhouse in Kitley

Newbliss School

(School Section No. 5)

 

newbliss-school-house-1861-62-map
School location on map of 1861-62

Concession #4, Lot 13, built late 1830’s (see map)

Newbliss village had a log school which was replaced in 1874 by a stone structure. Newbliss School was phased out of existence in 1961 with the pupils being transferred to Jasper.

Newbliss had two schoolhouses to serve the community, each its own section. The first school was built around 1830 and was titled S.S. #5 Newbliss School. It is believed the first schoolhouse for S.S. #5 was made of log, however no records of the school exist. In 1858, the stone schoolhouse which replaced the log structure was erected. This schoolhouse is still standing, located at the intersection of Highway 29 and Line Road 4. (Kitley 1795-1975 by Glenn Lockwood)

 

newbliss-school-c1985
Newbliss School c1985

 

 

 

 

newbliss-school-house-1
Newbliss Schoolhouse- November 2016
newbliss-school-house-2
Newbliss Schoolhouse – November 2016
newbliss-school-house-3
Newbliss Schoolhouse – November 2016

Mott’s Mills – A One Room Schoolhouse in Kitley

Mott’s Mills School

 (School Section No. 3)

 

motts-mills-school-house-1861-62-map
Location of School on map of 1861-62

Concession #3, Lot 21, built c1833 (see map)

Generations of Motts Mills children were educated at the community’s old one room school, which closed around 1950. The original log school was built on Lot 21 of the 3rd Concession of Kitley. It was succeed by a frame building, which in turn was demolished to make room for a stone school built in 1906.

In its heyday, the school accommodated up to 80 pupils. When Motts Mills went into decline and the population dropped, school enrolment was greatly reduced. After the Second World War, the decline was much more noticeable. All schools in the north of Leeds suffered setbacks and many were closed.

Further down the Town Line Road, Blanchard’s School suffered reverses and was closed in 1956. Pupils from Blanchard’s were then transferred to Mott’s Mills.

Pioneer Sam Hough was the original owner of the land on which Mott’s Mills School stood. The Lot no 21 in the 3rd Concession of Kitley was deeded to Hough on December 18, 1803. In 1816, the lot was sold to Sam’s son, Brewin Hough who in turn disposed of it in the following year to Micajah Purdy. It was probably in Purdy’s time that the first school was erected on the lot. George S. Scovil bought the lot in 1833, and that portion on which the school stood was deeded over to the area school board.

Motts Mills School also closed in the early 1960’s. Students from these two schools were then bussed to Jasper Public School.

Mitchell School – A One Room Schoolhouse in Kitley

Mitchell School

(School Section No. 14)

 

mitchell-school-house-1861-62-map
Location of school on map of 1861-62

Concession #8, Lot 23, built late 1840’s (see map

If anyone has any information or photos regarding this school we would appreciate hearing from you.

 

 

 

 

The Athens Reporter and County of Leeds Advertiser

Tuesday March 5, 1895 issue

 Mitchell’s School (Kitley S.S. #14)

Honor roll for Mitchell’s school for the month of February. Names appear in order of merit.

Sr. IV.- Ethel Yates, Gordon Mitchell

Jr. IV.- John Fenlon, Myrtle Emmons, Anna Judge, Nellie Crummy

III. – Maude Fenlon, Stanley Bulford, Ernest Potter

  1. – Blanch Emmons, Minnie Judge, Alex. Dixon, Anna Maney

Pt. II. – Valeria Pratt, Susan Judge, Maude Yates

  1. – Florence Fenlon, Florence Montgomery.

C.L. Yates, Teacher

 

Mahon’s School – A One Room Schoolhouse in Kitley

Mahon’s School

(School Section No. 10)

Bellamys Mill was its own common school section, known as school section #10. The school, first built in 1836, was named S.S. #10 Mahon’s School. The first log schoolhouse burned down and was rebuilt in the 1850’s across the road. The school ran successfully until the 1910’s when it was periodically closed and reopened until its permanent closure in the 1940’s. At the time of its closure it was converted into a private residence. Additionally at Bellamy’s Mill was a Roman Catholic separate school, known as R.C. #10. (Wikipedia)

If anyone has any additional information or photos we would appreciate hearing from you.

Lehigh School – A One Room Schoolhouse in Kitley

Lehigh’s School (Leehy’s School)

School Section #18

 

lehigh-school-house-1861-62-map
Location of school on map of 1861-62

Concession #9, Lot 22 (see map)

Gideon Leehy believed in educating the youngsters, so he put up a log school on the south side of Kitley’s Ninth Concession Road.

The school lasted until 1851, when it burned down. By this time a number of other families had moved in and a small community was flourishing.

The good burghers elected to build a stone school, which was completed in 1852. For 109 years it served the area well, standing sturdy and sound on the north side of the road, opposite the charred remains of the old school.

In 1961, the school was phased out of the system and replaced by the modern Frankville School on Hwy. 29.

Old school records show that in 1872, R.W.Hornick was the teacher of the one room school. In 1882 the school’s budget was $200., rising to $230 the next year.

Malcome Lehigh was teaching there in 1887 and in 1896 the muster showed six Leigh children attending: Maude, Mertle, Edna, Carrie, Everett and Ernie Lehigh. The last teacher when the final class was dismissed in 1961 was Aileen Montgomery.

lehigh-school-c1985
Lehigh School

 

The Athens Reporter and County of Leeds Advertiser

Tuesday Jan. 1, 1895 issue-

Leehy’s School (Kitley SS #18)

Following is the result of the Christmas examinations held at Leehy’s School. Names appear in order of merit:

Fourth Class- Everett Leehy, Carrie Leehy, Bruce Holmes, John Howie, Stella Kilborn, Bruce Ireland, Frank Livingston

Third Class- Edna Leehy, Susie Ireland, Mary Livingston

Second Class- Roy Kilborn, Blanche Eaton, Thorton Levingston and Elmo Judson

Part 1- Victoria Johnston,

Tella Beach, Teacher

 

Tuesday Feb. 5, 1895 issue-

Leehy’s School ( Kitley SS #18)

Honor roll for Leehy’s school for the month of January. Names appear in order of merit:

Fourth Class – Everett Leehy, Carrie Leehy, John Howie, Stella Kilborn, Bruce Holmes, Bruce Ireland

Third Class – Edna Leehy, Roy Kilborn, Blanche Eaton, and Susie Ireland

Second Class – Thornton Levingston

Part I – Victoria Johnston\Those attending every day during the month: Everett Leehy, Carrie Leehy, Stella Kilborn, Edna Leehy, Roy Kilborn

Tella Beach, Teacher

 

Tuesday April 16, 1895 issue

Leehy’s School ( Kitley SS #18)

Results of Easter examinations of Leehy’s school. Total number of marks, 850.

Fourth Class – John Howie 695, Everett  Leehy 594, Stella Kilborn 500, Bruce Holmes 426, Carrie Leehy 368

Third Class – Roy Kilborn 363, Edna Leehy 529, Blanche Eaton 392, Susie Ireland 62

Second Class – Elmo Judson 526, Thornton Livingston 401

Tella Beach, Teacher

 

 

 

 

 

Lake Eloida School – A One Room Schoolhouse in Kitley

Lake Eloida School

School Section #17

kitley-master-1861-62-map-6
School location on a map from 1861-62

Concession #10, Lot 27 (see map)

 

Known as “17 Kitley and 19 Yonge” built on part of Concession 10, Lot 27 in KItley. It served the rear lots of 10 to 30 of Concession 10 in Kitley, Concession 11 of Yonge and some of Bastard. It was built in 1868 and closed in 1961. Previous to it being built school was held in the home of William T. Howe who lived on that land. Thomas Howe received these 200 acres by Crown Patent Sept. 1. 1838 but had been developing the land since at least 1820. The original nominee of this land was Solomon Conley and Margaret Howe. In his will he left part of the land plus 50 pounds to be used to build a school. In the early years of the school it was also used as a Church.

 

lake-eloida-school-house
Lake Eloida School
lake-eloida-school-class-of-1895-copy
Lake Eloida School Class of 1895 (Galt Museum Archives)
lake-eloida-school-house
Lake Eloida School House

 

Lake Eloida School- photo by Hans-Ulrich Raffelt taken April 2017

 

The Athens Reporter and County of Leeds Advertiser

Tuesday Feb. 5, 1895 issue-

Lake Eloida School (Kitley SS #17)

The following is a list of the pupils whose work entitled them to place on the honor roll (names appear in order of merit):

IV.- Nellie Wiltsie

III – Amos Wiltsie, James Poirier, Harry Everett, Anna Thomas

II – Robert Everett, Martha Kincaid, Roy Johnson, Floyd Howe, Edna Howe

Pt II. – Charlie Stephenson

I – Omer Davis

Those who attended every day, Nellie Wiltsie, Floyd Howe

Maggie Wiltsie, Teacher

 

Lake Eloida School (S.S.#17) Kitley

Tuesday Aug 20, 1895 issue

Sarah Holmes, wife of Horace Booth, died on Monday last at her residence near Lake Eloida. Mrs. Booth was born on the farm adjoining the one on which she died and has always resided in that neighbourhood. She was in her 71st year at the time of her death. The funeral will take place at the Lake Eloida school house at 10 a.m. to-morrow (Wednesday)

 

 

Kinch St. School – A One Room Schoolhouse in Kitley

Kinch St. School

 (School Section No. 8)

 

kinch-st-school-house-1861-62-map
School location on a map of 1861-82

Concession #6, Lot 9, built 1840’s (see map)

The first log school house here was built in the early 1840’s on the west corner of the farm of pioneer Isaac Foster. Known as S.S. #8, the log school burned down a few years after it was built.

The community replaced it with a wooden frame structure sheeted in galvanized iron and painted white. For around 100 years it educated generations of Kinch Street children, until it was phased out by the school consolidation in the 1950’s.

The teacher in 1876 was John Mackay, a veteran educationalist who taught in Newbliss for 20 years before coming to this school.

School trustees in 1876 were Isaac Foster who had donated the plot on which the school stood, James Love and James Morrissey, who was also the board’s secretary treasurer. A Dr. Kinney was the school inspector.

Frankville – A One Room Schoolhouse in Kitley

Frankville School

 

The old Frankville school was built in 1875 and served until a new school was built in 1975.

If anyone has any information or photos we would appreciate hearing from you.

old-frankville-school-1
Old Frankville School House- no date on photo

 

 

 

frankville-public-school-c1985
Frankville Public School c1985
frankville-1861-62-map
Frankville from a map of 1861-62

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Frankville School- Photo by Hans-Ulrich Raffelt taken April 2017

 

 

Crystal School – A One Room Schoolhouse in Kitley

Crystal School

 (School Section No. 12)

 

Concession #7, Lot 6, built 1875 (see map)crystal-school-house-1861-62-map

George Hornick built the area’s first school. The school was located in Lot 6 of the 7th Concession. The exact date of the construction is unknown but it was listed in the 1861 census.

It was a school which held both Kitley and Wolford pupils, being know on the Kitley side as S.S. No.12.

In 1861 it was located between the farm houses of George and Robert Hornick and in 1872 the teacher was Samuel Hornick. In 1875 Sam Hornick sold the half acre on which the school was located to the local school trustees.

The school one of the last log structures to be used by the Leeds and Grenville School system was phased out in 1961 after more than a century of service, and Crystal area children were bussed to a new school in Frankville. The old log structure was sold to a Brown Family, moved to the North Augusta Road and renovated as a home.

If anyone has any photos or additional information on this school we would appreciate hearing from you.

Coad School – A One Room Schoolhouse in Kitley

Coad School and Dack’s School

 (School Section No. 6)

 

Concession #4, Lot 17, built early 19th Century (see map)coad-school-house-1861-62-map

 

The former Coad’s school, a stone building, was erected in 1875, replacing the earlier log cabin school. The school had originally been named for the Dack Family, but adopted the name of Coad in the 1850’s.

Dack’s school was built on Lot 17 of Concession 4 about 1830, a simple log structure with unpainted interior walls and austere benches and desks.

“The other school section in Newbliss was #6, with its school being called S.S. #6 Coad’s School. Originally, Coad’s School was known as Dack’s. This schoolhouse was also constructed of log before being replaced by a stone building in 1870. Upon its closure in the 1940s, Coad’s School was sold to the Orange Lodge.” (Kitley 1795-1975 by Glenn Lockwood)

 

Coad’s School- photo by Hans-Ulrich Raffelt taken April 2017

 

 

 

Blanchard School – A One Room Schoolhouse in Kitley

Blanchard School

 (School Section No. 4 or 11)

Concession #1, Lot 26, built 1834  (see map)blanchards-hill-school-1861-62-map

Shane’s School enjoyed an upswing in attendance during the 1950’s, when more people moved into the area. Further down the Town Line Road, Blanchard’s School suffered reverses and was closed in 1956. Pupils from Blanchard’s were then transferred to Mott’s Mills.

Blanchard’s reopened in 1961, operated for two years and closed forever in 1966. Motts Mills School also closed in the early 1960’s. Students from these two schools were then bussed to Jasper Public School.

Blanchard’s School was originally a log cabin located on the northwest corner of the Gardiner homestead. It was replaced in 1874 by a stone structure and educated generations’ of Blanchard children over the next 90 years.

In the School reorganization of the 1960’s, the school was phased out. It is now a private residence and stands on Lot 26 of the First Concession of Kitley. The school was built on land donated by the Gardiners.

In the 1870’s, probably 10 to 15 South Elmsley students attended Blanchard’s School. In 1874, John Gardiner sold the corner lot of his homestead to the school section as the site of a new school. A stone school was erected without borrowing money.

Thomas and Richard Gilday of Lombardy, brothers who specialized in carriage making, also were carpenters and stone masons. They built the new Blanchard’s School.

Blanchard’s School in 1905 had 21 pupils but in 1940 only 5 attended the school. New families coming into the area built up the population again but there were still less than 20 students when the school finally closed in 1963.

(Recorder and Times c1980 Darling Collection Book 5, pg.1)

blanchards-hill-school-built-in-1874-c1985
Blanchard Hill School c1985

Glossville – A Forgotten Hamlet in Elizabethtown

Glossville

hawkes-school-1861-62-map
Location of Hawke’s School in Glossville on a map from 1861-62

The motorist passes through the former hamlet of Glossville so fast that they don’t realize that they just passed through a bit of Elizabethtown history.

Probably 100 to 125 years ago, Glossville was in its glory. But when the oldest residents of the area were in their childhood, the name of Glossville was already beginning to fade. Just what caused Glossville to be forgotten is unknown.

Perhaps it was because the cheese factory was the only thing that the community had going for it. The first factory burned down and was replaced by another on the same spot that was eventually turned into a home. When the factory fell on evil days and business started going down the drain, Glossville began to lose its glamour. When the factory closed probably 100 years ago, this hamlet died with it. The last cheese maker was a Ben Scott and it’s probable that he made his last cheese in the factory during the years of the First Great War 1914-18. Afterwards he was cheese maker at the Addison plant which later closed in 1942.

The Halls moved into the old cheese factory and set up a small confectionery and grocery store in one of the front rooms.

It may be hard to believe, but this tiny lost hamlet once boasted a newspaper. Oldtimers say stories handed down by their families tell of a weekly newspaper, the Glossford Review, which was once printed here.

There was a school in Glossville called “Hawke’s School. The school was so named because there were two group of Hawke’s children who attended the school in it’s early years. One Hawke farm was located north of the school the other farm to the south of the school. The school was sandwiched between the two farm families and filled with Hawke children. It was here that Glossville children were educated. The community sent its children to the old brick school long after people stopped using the name Glossville. After Hawke’s closed the children were bussed to Frankville or to Addison. Land for the school was donated to the area school board in 1857 by John Hawke, and it is probable that the stone building was erected within the following three years. Hawke’s School closed in 1962. The school was located at the junction of Hwy 29 and the Lake Eloida Road.

Around 1850, a tavern was reputed to have done a thriving business at the junction of the Rocksprings Road and Hwy 29, but today there is no trace of a building there.

Glossville was located north of Addison on Hwy 29 between the intersection of the Rocksprings Rd. and the dirt road leading to Lake Eloida.     (Recorder and Times c1980, Darling Scrapbook No 3)

grossville-cheese-factory-darling-bk-3
Glossville Cheese Factory
glossville-abandoned-home-on-way-to-glossville-darling-bk3p91
Abandoned home on the way to Glossville, photo Recorder and Times c1980
glossville-cheese-factory-hall-residence-darling-bk3p92
Former Glossville Cheese Factory, now Hall Residence (Photo Recorder and Times c1980)
glosville-hawkes-school-c1950-darling-bk3p90
Hawke’s School c1950
glosville-rhea-peterson-home-buolt-c1870-darling-bk3p91
Rhea Peterson Home built c1870 (photo Recorder and Times c1980)

The Athens Reporter and County of Leeds Advertiser

Excerpts have been taken from this paper referencing the following hamlet for the years 1889, 1894 and 1895

 

 Glossville Jan 8, 1889, reporter writes:

December- On Tuesday, the 11th, Miss Hattie Mott, near Frankville was married to Mr. Richard Latimer, near Elbe Mills, at the residence of the bride’s mother, Mrs. Mott. There were about 60 guests present at the nuptial ceremony. The presents were valuable and numerous. The happy pair departed for Toronto and the west to spend a few days.

There are some score of other marriages under way, which will come off in rapid and happy succession, for there never was a time when there were so many strangers wandering about enquiring there way home, bewildered by the charms of the girls who adorn this neighbourhood

The Athens Reporter and County of Leeds Advertiser

 Nov 18, 1894 issue-

Addison, Saturday Nov.10-

Mr. Robert Barlow of Glossville has leased his farm to a very extensive farmer of Kitley and will live a retired life for a few years to come.

Dr. Brown of Mt. Pleasant has disposed of his celebrated bay, Boston, to Mr. Richard Cardiff of Glossville who intends fitting it up for spring races.

 

Nov 18, 1894 issue-

Glossville, Nov. 10-

The butter factory has commenced operations again under the management of Messrs. McKee and Elliott.

Mrs. Henry Davis, of Jellyby, is a guest at Mrs. R. Barlow’s

Grey horses were son numerous last week that if such is to be continued we advise the construction of a new bridge at their headquarters or accept the sage [sic] suggestion- i.e., take the ditch for it

Mr. Levi Church spent Sunday with his parents.

Mrs. R. Barlow is slowly recovering from her severe illness

Mrs. Giles of Montreal is a guest at her daughter’s, Mrs. Sheldon Holmes of Sunny View.

Mr. Madden Hewitt will soon move to his winter residence in the west end. Miss. Anna and Adella Scott spent Sunday at their home in Valleyville.

Suggestion: “Ships that pass in the night” should employ better pilots.

 

Tuesday Nov 20, 1894 issue-   (date show is the date on the paper, not the correct date)

Glen Buell, Nov 26-

Some time ago Ethiopean John, while rusticating in the woods back of Glossville, came across a very large black bear. Having no weapon and lacking sufficient courage to attack him single handed, he retreated to the house of his host, the well known steam threshing machine man, where be succeeded in getting a gun and the assistance of ‘Forgie’ to help slay the dangerous animal. Throwing off the governor belt they soon arrived at the scene of his bearship, but, lo ! to their amazement, the bear turned out to be a large black cat. Score one for John who says that his eyes must have magnified that cat.

 

Tuesday Dec. 4, 1894 issue-

Glossville– Friday, Nov. 30-

Mr. and Mrs. J. Best have returned from their honey moon trip to Ottawa and have settled in our midst.

Miss. Davis of Fairfield and Mr. Ed. Lyons of Smith’s Falls spent Sunday at Barlowville.

Glossville was represented at all the surrounding entertainments on Friday night, some at Athens, Saginaw and Glen Buell. All report a very enjoyable time.

Mr. C. Hawks has returned from the north where he held an agency for the Rochester nurseries.

Mr. and Mrs. G. Booth of Browntown are visiting friends in Carleton Place.

Mr. R. Love who has been suffering for some time from effects of a cancer is slowly recovering under the treatment of Dr. Dixon of Frankville.

 

Tuesday Nov 20, 1894 issue-   (date show is the date on the paper, not the correct date)

Addison, Saturday Nov. 24-

Wedding bells have again pealed forth their melodies in our midst’s, it being the marriage of Mr. John Best, of Glossville to Hanna, daughter of Mr. James Brown of the same place on the 21st inst. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Mr. Knox in the presence of about 100 invited guests, after which all partook of a sumptuous repast provided for the occasion. The presents were costly and numerous, showing the very high esteem in which the young couple were held in the community. The orchestra from Addison and vicinity assembled about 10:45 o’clock and discoursed some excellent music. The bride and groom left on the 2 p.m. train for Ottawa on a short honeymoon trip, taking with them the best wishes of  all that theirs may be a long and happy life.

Tuesday Jan. 8, 1895 issue-

Mr. Peter Baker of Cornwall, is spending a few days with friends in Glossville and vicinity.

Tuesday March 5, 1895 issue

Mrs. James Brown of Glossville is on the sick list. We hope it will not prove serious.

 Tuesday March 19, 1895 issue

Mr. Franklin Wiltse and son of Silver Brook, champion  sawers of this section, cut nearly 100 cords of stove wood in one day recently for Mr. Selah Hawks of Glossville. Any one wanting wood cut on short notice should give them a call.

Mr. A. Church of Mt. Pleasant has moved to Glossville which leaves a first class blacksmith stand to lease for the present.

Tuesday Oct 8, 1895 issue

Addison, Saturday, Oct. 5, –

Wedding bells will soon ring out at Glossville

Tuesday Oct 15, 1895 issue

Addison, Monday Oct. 7, –

Mr. James Hall of Glossville met with quite a serious accident last week by getting struck on the hand as he was moving the thresher in the barn, which dislocated his thumb and bruised his hand to quite an extent. Mr. Thomas Whitford is engaged as foreman for the present.

Tuesday Oct 29, 1895 issue

Glossville Floral Wedding

The happy event which excited so much pleased interest at Glossville has come and gone, namely the marriage of Miss Addie Barlow to Mr John M. Percival of Forthton. The ceremony took place at the residence of the bride’s father, Robert Barlow, Esq., Glossville, on the 23rd inst. The house was beautifully fitted for the occasion, being tastefully decorated throughout with evergreens, flowers, and mottoes the whole suitably trimmed white. The decorating and illuminating were more than a success.

The bride wore a lovely cream satin beautifully trimmed with white, and was assisted by six of her cousins who acted as maids of honor. At eight o’clock p.m. when every person was quite, unexpectedly the six maids of honor in a procession two deep, in a tandem satin belt, advanced into the large and well filled parlor of the fine residence. The bride and her father followed to the tune of the wedding march which was played by Miss Davis of Brockville. The happy couple were joined together by the Rev Rural Dean Grout of Lyn under a beautifully executed flora design.  The congratulations being over the dining room was next of interest and thither the over one hundred guests wended their way. It was magnificently laid out with a substantial and elegant repast. After the tempting ????  had received all due attention and many entertaining remarks, conversation and friendly greetings, the happy couple left for Montreal and other eastern points. The presents were pronounced ‘lovely’ as well as being numerous and valuable. Our best wishes go with them (this article was blurred and difficult to read, there may be some mistakes)

Tuesday Dec 10, 1895 issue

Glossville, Monday Dec 8, –

The milk meeting was held last Wednesday evening in Glossville school house was largely attended.

Mr.Levi Church lost a valuable horse last week

Glossville butter factory is running full blast. We are sure people are pleased with the returns as milk is drawn from Easton’s Corners and other distant points.

Miss Elva Pepper who has been in ill health for the last two years, is gradually sinking. Slight hopes are entertained of her recovery.

The young people of this section are making great preparations for the concert which is to be held in Ashwood Hall, Addison, on the evening of Dec. 20th. As no pains are being spared, it will doubtlessly be the event of the season.

Rumor says wedding bells are soon to ring again.

Mrs. Oliver Bishop of Oswego is visiting friends in Glossville and vicinity for a few weeks.

Glen Buell – A Hamlet in Elizabethtown

Glen Buell  (Hayes Corners)

2-glen-buell

This quiet hamlet on Highway 29, nine miles north of Brockville has a long and chequered history dating back to 1787. Back then it was wilderness dotted by farms and homesteads of the early settlers. It is located where Hwy 29 crosses the Seventh Concession of Elizabethtown,

 

Originally known as Hayes Corners, from the numerous Hayes families which lived here, the hamlet was given the name of Glen Buell in the late 1800’s. No one knows for sure how Glen Buell was named; although the Buell name was well know in Brockville and district.

 

 

Old timers recalled that years ago the Brockville and Westport Railway line cut through a shallow rock outcropping, and the rock cut was known as “the Glen”. A board fence at the rock cut protected the tracks from winter snowdrifts. So it is possible someone joined “Glen” and “Buell” to create the name.

The Hayes family settled at this corner around 1805. Family tradition says the Hayes were closely related to Rutherford Hayes (1822-1893) , 19th president of the United States. The Hayes migrated here from Connecticut.

In the 1840’s Glen Buell must have been fairly populous, for 17 year old teacher Peter Booth reported in 1842 that he had 63 pupils in his one room country school. Booth the first teacher estimated there were as many more eligible students in the area.

The first known record relating to the Glen Buell area is the deed granting Lot No. 28, Seventh Concession of Elizabethtown to Henry Clow on November 5, 1787.  (Recorder and Times c1980, Darling Book #3)

 

The Hayes Family (Leavitt)

Eri Hayes, Sr. was born in Connecticut, December 6th, 1780, his parents being Ashael and Anna Hayes. In 1796, Eri removed to Canada and in 1805 he settled on Lot No 32 in the 6th Concession of Elizabethtown; he afterwards purchased 35 acres at the place known as Hayes’ Corners. Mr. Hayes married Anne, daughter of David Derbyshire. In 1807 the parents of Mr. Hayes came to Elizabethtown, locating on Lot 30 in the 5th Concession. Eri died in 1839, his wife surviving until 1860. His family consisted of the following children: Eri Jr. born January 24th 1808, married Betsey daughter of Benoni Wiltse; Carmi, born in 1810, married Mary, daughter of Neil Palmer; he died at Grand Rapids in 1876; Daniel born in 1811, married Deborah, daughter of Daniel Wing; Ira, born in 1815, died in 1844; Chauncy, born in 1816, married a daughter of William Knowles.glen-buell-jos-hayes-leavitt-pg-146

 

Joseph Hayes was born May 10th 1818; he resides on the homestead. In 1839 he married Thankful, daughter of Gardiner Lee, by whom he has ha five children. Mrs. Hayes dying in 1850, Mr. Hayes married for his second wife, Emily, daughter of the late Rosewell Rowley of Elizabethtown. Mr. Hayes’ family consisted of the following children: Ervin, who died in Michigan in 1874, leaving a widow and two children; Eri Jr. born in 1844, married Louisa daughter of John Cummings of Elizabethtown; William born in 1846, resides in Michigan; Charles , born in 1848, married a daughter of James Cummings of Lansdowne; Emeline, born in 1850 married Solomon Rowley of Elizabethtown.

Eri Hayes, Sr. had the following daughters: Sarah married Albert Blanchard; Orilla resides in Iowa.

(History of Leeds and Grenville by Thad. Leavitt pub 1879)

 

Methodist Church

Glen Buell Methodist Church- The land for this church was bought in 1888 from Boyd Hall and his wife. The church was built in 1890 with William Gray and Edmund Westlake as carpenters. The bricks used to build this church were brought from Lyn. They were from the Wesleyan Methodist Church in Lyn which was blown down during a storm in 1888.

glen-buell-church-toledo-library
Original Interior
glen-buell-methodists-church-built-1890-darling-bk3p81
Glen Buell Church c1980

 

 

 

 

 

 

methodist-church-at-glen-buell-1890-digital-mack-6
Glen Buell Church – photo 2015
methodist-church-at-glen-buell-1890-digital-mack-4
Interior looking to the back of the church – photo 2015
methodist-church-at-glen-buell-1890-digital-mack-2
Interior looking to the front of the church -photo 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Purchased at a garage sale in the region.
Glen Buell Store and Post Office c1890 , this is a ‘glass plate photograph’
Purchased at a garage sale in the region.
Glen Buell Store and Post Office c1890
Purchased at a garage sale in the region.
Glenn Buell Post Office and Store c1890 facing Highway 29, north of the church
glen-buell-house-wb6
House at Glen Buell c1890
Purchased at a garage sale in the region.
House at Glen Buell c1890

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Purchased at a garage sale in the region.
Canoeing on Lamb’s Pond c1890
Purchased at a garage sale in the region.
Lamb’s Pond c1890

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1-glen-buell
Counties Map of 1998
Purchased at a garage sale in the region.
Glen Buell School, c1890- located facing Hwy 29, south of the intersection, the school was torn down in the 1980’s

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

glen-buell-cemetery-august-2016-3
Glen Buell Cemetery steps on Hwy 29 -photo 2016
glen-buell-cemetery-sep-2016-4
Glen Buell Cemetery – photo 2016
glen-buell-cemetery-sep-2016-21
Glen Buell Cemetery – photo 2016

Glen Buell Cheese Factory

glen-buell-cheese-factory-1892

In the spring of 1881, Mr.C.J.Gilroy erected the cheese factor which is illustrated at the head of the article. The cut is from a pencil sketch by our special artist and was engraved especially for the columns of the Reporter.

The making room is 28×32 feet, is well arranged and under the efficient supervision of Mr. B.S McConnell, is so well kept and clean that there is scarcely color enough to indicate the business carried on in the room. The drying room is 20×40 feet. On the day of our visit there were between 75 and 100 cheese on the shelves which had a remarkably fine and uniform appearance. The whey house is a separate building in the top of which are the vats for the storage of whey. A steam injector forces the whey into these tanks, from which the drawers get their supply under cover.

This spring Mr. Gilroy threw out the old boiler and supplied its place with a fine new one of 16 horse power, and in order to make room for it and a large water reservoir, he enlarged the engine room to more than twice the size shown in the cut.

The factory is now in its eleventh year and under Mr. Gilroy has steadily increased in business and popularity until this season he is making up the milk from 586 cows. He assured our representatives that this large number of cows was obtained without driving a mile or canvassing a single person for their milk. We understand it is Mr.Gilroy’s intention in putting in te large boiler to heat the building with steam and thus paving the way for making up to the 1st of January each year.

Mr. Gilroy is and has been the efficient secretary of the Brockville Dairymen’s Board of Trade for several years, a position he occupies to the satisfaction of the cheese men and credit to himself. He is also the proprietor of a finely arranged country store, is postmaster of Glen Buell, and runs a large farm in connection with his other business. He is also identified in active church work and the fine new brick church, now nearly completed, owes its inception and present location in a large measure to the untiring energy and zeal of Mr. Gilroy. On the day of our visit a number of the farmers from the vicinity were busily engaged helping Mr. Gilroy plant some very fine ornamental trees in front of the church lot. It is expected that the church will be ready of dedication in a short time, when we hope to be able to give a short synopsis of the opening as well as a cut of the building.

We may add in some conclusion that the neighbourhood of Glenn Buell is peopled with a class of farmers whose comfortable condition, industrious habits, genial disposition, and courteous intercourse with each other are very commendable. These are the sterling qualities which go to form the basis of Ontario’s intellectual, social and financial greatness.

Article from the May 10, 1892 issue of the “Athens Reporter”

Edna’s Scrapbook”

is a paperback book written by Edna B. Chant and was published in 1998. Edna Chant was a reported with the “Athens Reporter” for 23 years and she is the author of four books.

Her book, which is made up of news clippings from various sources, from which we have taken excerpts, gives us a glimpse into life in our area for over a hundred year period ending with stories from 1975.

While her book covers many areas of Leeds and Grenville we have only focused on the area within Elizabethtown-Kitley Township.

Glen Buell

The new Methodist Church at Glenn Buell was built in 1890 and 91. The mason was James Walker of Algonquin. All the limestone used for the foundation, base, corners and sill were taken from the old Methodist Church at Lyn and redressed by Charlie Denny stone cutter of Athens.

A well known Glen Buell resident, Walter Darling, was drowned in Watertown, NY on July 1, 1893. He was employed in Brockville as a bookkeeper. The body was brought to his home at Glen Buell where the funeral was held.

Mrs. Sarah Collins of Glen Buell, aged 87 years, has been a very active woman and hard worker both inside and out. On May 10, 1897 she was carrying a mattress upstairs when she dropped dead with the mattress on top of her. She had carried it down a few hours before and out it out in the sun to air.

Milo Lee of Glen Buell died in a mysterious way on April 8, 1897. He was repairing a windmill for George Elwood and was at the top of it, when his body was seen to be hanging by one arm. He made no reply to shouts from the ground so Mr. Elwood climbed up to see what was wrong, and found he was dead. Help was soon on hand and it was with great difficulty that the body was lowered to the ground. He had slipped his arm through a brace at the top and this had prevented him from falling down.

Just five minutes after the teacher at Glen Buell schoolhouse called her pupils in after recess, a high wind blew the roof off of the school, on April 21, 1909. If the children had been in the yard some might have been killed.

On July 12, 1915 a Ford car driven by T.J.McConnell of Lyndhurst was struck by the B&W train at Glen Buell crossing. Passengers in the car were Mrs. George Rooney, her son Travers, Miss. Alma Graham and Miss. Beatrice Webster. All were thrown out except the driver who had a fractured leg. He was sent to hospital in Brockville. Dr. Roy Donovan of Brockville was on the train and he attended the injured. The ladies had cuts and bruises. Miss. Graham required stitches to her face and knee. The driver and all his passengers said the train did not whistle. It was raining at the time and the car top was up and the side curtains closed. The car was damaged beyond repair.

November 18, 1919 the Glen Buell Cheese Factory was burned.

The house and barn of Burton Baxter at Glen Buell were burned on October 16, 1930. The cows were saved but everything else was destroyed. A year ago another barn owned by Mr. Baxter was burned.

On August 31, 1953 Robert Perkins age 72 years was instantly killed on the highway near his home at Glen Buell when a farm tractor he was driving was struck by a car driven by J.B. Kelly of Athens.

In September 1958 the Glen Buell Church was saved from burning by the quick action of neighbours. Mrs. Melvyn Benton went into the church to place flowers in memory of her mother. When she opened the door she was met by the flames. She ran to a nearby house and rang the fire alarm system which worked well, as in a very short time help was coming from all directions. The stove sitting just inside the door burned its shape into the floor when a leg on the old woodstove gave way and the stove fell over on its side. The church board are going to order an oil burner.

Three persons died in a two car head on crash at Glen Buell on November 15, 1967. Mr. and Mrs. Philip Pereira of Athens were returning from an auction sale near Lyn when their car was in collision with a car driven by Joseph Burke of Ottawa, who was accompanied by his wife. Mrs. Pereria and Mr. and Mrs. Burke were killed. Mr. Pereira was seriously injured. Both cars were wrecked.

Forthton – A Hamlet in Elizabethtown

Forthton (Unionville)

2-forthton-1862-62
Map of 1861-62

John Kilborn and his wife Elizabeth Baldwin established a store at Unionville about 1816. He was also given a government post assisting settlement of immigrants. Many of the early residents of the Perth area passed through his hands. The settlers travelled overland by wagon and in some cases had to cut their own roads through the forests. John Kilborn was a 17 year old store clerk in Brockville when the War of 1812 broke out. He immediately enlisted in a regiment being formed in Brockville. In September 1812 he took part in the raid by British and Canadian forces on Ogdensburg. He remained in the militia and in 1845 was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. (Recorder and Times, Darling Scrapbook No.5)

 

By the 1840’s Unionville was a thriving entrepot at the junction of the Macadamized Road to Smith’s Falls and the Plank Road to Farmersville. A private company, the Farmersville Plank Road Company, was chartered with a capital of £1600 divided into 320 shares at £5 each, “to make a plank road from Unionville to Farmersville, build toll gates and bridges, secure the necessary stones and make all the grading required for the road”.

victoria-rd-br-may-10-1849-sfb5

Victoria Macadamized Road- May 17, 1849

An advertisement appears calling for tenders for the completion of the several sections of the Victoria macadamized road leading from the residence of John Taylor, in the fourth concession of Elizabethtown, to Unionville. The tenders were to state the lowest terms for which the whole or any part of the road would be planked or macadamized. Tenders were referred for particulars to Thomas Hume, district surveyor.

 

When the post office opened in 1831, postmaster E. H. Whitmarsh changed the community’s name from Stone’s Corner to Unionville. Two years later the post office was suspended, but the place kept the name, last appearing on a map in 1861.

 

 

Unionville Fairunion-fairgrounds-forthton-pab-7-f10-10

As the village of Unionville grew, the Elizabethtown Agricultural Society held its annual fair in a vacant field opposite the Forth Hotel. Permanent buildings were constructed, including barns, exhibit halls and bleachers. The Unionville Racetrack was located along Highway No. 42 north of Forthton.

 

 

 

bkv-fair-tbt-feb-22-1905

Brockville Fair Feb 22, 1905

Directors Meet to Organize- a Four Day’s Exhibition This Year.

At a meeting of the new Board of |Directors of the Brockville Fair, held yesterday afternoon, R.H. Field was re-elected secretary and Ed. Davis treasurer. The following committees were appointed:

Sports- W.H.Comstock, F.I Rtchie, N.H.Beecher, D.Forth.

Printing and advertising- R.H.Field, R.J.Jelly, G.A.Wright

Messrs Beecher and Field were delegated to represent the association at the meeting of representatives of fairs of Eastern Ontario in Ottawa on March 8th.

The four-day exhibition proved such a great success last year that it was decided to repeat the performance in 1905, beginning with either Monday Sept. 11th or Tuesday Sept. 12th which will be definitely settled later.

The Board will meet again on March 10th for the purpose of revising the prize list.

Forthton is located north of Brockville on Highway 29 at the intersection of Hwy 42

(selected excerpts from Elizabethtown: The Last of the Royal Townships, by Alvyn Austin pub 2009)

 

 

forthton-stn-sb2p3r
Old B&W Railroad station at Forthton
old-forth-residencs-at-forthton-taken-in-1978-2
Old Forth Residence c1978
forthton-former-inn-photo-alvyn-austin
Former Inn and Hotel at Forthton
4-h-homemaking-club-2-54-416
Forthton 4-H Homemaking Club c1954
img051
Road sign on 29 Highway
1-forthton
1998 Map of Forthton

 

“Edna’s Scrapbook”

is a paperback book written by Edna B. Chant and was published in 1998. Edna Chant was a reported with the “Athens Reporter” for 23 years and she is the author of four books.

Her book, which is made up of news clippings from various sources, from which we have taken excerpts, gives us a glimpse into life in our area for over a hundred year period ending with stories from 1975.

While her book covers many areas of Leeds and Grenville we have only focused on the area within Elizabethtown-Kitley Township.

Forthton

The first post office at Unionville was opened on April 16th, 1841

At the Unionville Fair in August 1898, a special attraction was a race horse “Geraldine”, the Guideless Wonder”. The horse will race any horse, running without a rider and has never been beaten.

An amusing incident occurred at the Unionville Fair in 190. A woman borrowed a loaf of homemade bread fro a neighbour as she was expecting visitors. It looked so nice she entered in the fair and she got first prize.

Mowat Jackson 33 of Plum Hollow was killed on Oct 23, 1940 at Forthton.

Two men lost their lives in a motor accident at Forthton on No.29 Highway. Harry Countryman died instantly on October 30, 1941. His passenger William J. Hewitt died of injuries the next day.

A young resident of Forthton, Ronald Chant,21, was drowned in Lyn quarry on August 7, 1967. He had been swimming with other friends across the quarry when he seemed to tire suddenly and called for help. When friends reached him he disappeared. It took firemen and police almost an hour to recover the body. He was the only son of Mrs. Hazel Chant and the late Cecil Chant. He was employed at the Johnston Shoe Company in Brockville.

Fire destroyed a large dairy barn on the farm of Earl Seabrooke at Forthton on April 9, 1969. Mr. Seabrooke had just let his cows out to water, but the young cattle were in the barn. He was able to get 13 calves and a horse out safely but one calf, milking equipment and all other contents were lost. It is believed a short circuit in the wiring caused the fire.

The Athens Reporter and County of Leeds Advertiser

Excerpts have been taken from this paper referencing the following hamlet for the years 1889, 1894 and 1895

Tuesday Dec. 4, 1894 issue-

Forthton– Friday Nov 30-

Mrs. Giles of Montreal was the guest of Mrs. D.J.Forth last week.

Miss. Ella Hall and Mr. John M. Percival spent last week in Brockville.

Mr. John Forth is recovering from a severe attack of pleurisy.

The trustees of our school have engaged Miss. Anna Scot as a teacher for the coming year.

The social given by Epworth League on Friday evening was a grand success. The programme consisted of readings by Misses Hall and Clow which showed great vocal talent, solos by Misses Towris and Orton were exceptionally well rendered, and recitations by Hamilton, Lyn, and Chas. Howe, show that in the near future Glen Buell may produce some great orators. The chair was ably filed by Rev. J. Perley who gave a very appropriate address. Rev. W. Coates closed by a very interesting address on League work. The refreshments were such as “Delmonico’s”. By the way the cake vanished into a vacancy in a high corner of the house, one could conclude that they had a heart for the missing link of the chain band. Bob, did you get any !

Tuesday Aug 20, 1895 issue

Obituary

Dies at his residence near Unionville, on Sunday evening last, Charles Knapp, aged 61 years. Mr. Knapp was born in Plum Hollow and has always resided in this locality. He was a brother of Ithamer Knapp, postmaster, Plum Hollow

Stewart’s – A One Room School House in Elizabethtown

Stewart’s School

(School Section #1 – Elizabethtown)

(School Section #16 – Augusta)

 

Adiel Sherwood inherited Lots 1 & 2 on the death of his father in 1826, and four years later sold Lot 1 to Henry Bradfield, a stone mason. Bradfield who lived here for 50 years also donated land for a school in 1860 (S.S.#1) on the Highway. [1]

 

stewart-sch-ss1-photo-1955-1
Stewart’s School, photo taken in 1955
stewart-sch-ss1-photo-1955-2
Stewart’s School photo from 1955, unfortunately the people are unknown

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If anyone has any additional information or photos on this school, we would appreciate hearing from you.

 

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Stone building, 20×26 in size, constructed in 1844, condition: Good

1854: Stone building first opened in 1860

 

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

That the request of the trustees of Union School section No 1 in Elizabethtown and No 1 in the Twp of Augusta be completed and the sum of 90 pounds be levied and collected on that property 1862
that the trustees of School Section No. 1 be paid the sum of $0.67 cts as School tax on 12 acres of land on part Lots 7&8 in the 1st concession of Elizabethtown assessed to William Holms and the clerk order the same to be paid 1870
that the application of the trustees of School Section No 1 be complied with and the sum of $100 be levied and collected on the assessed taxable property of School Section No 1 of the Township of Elizabethtown for school purposes free from all expenses for the year 1870
that the application of the Trustees of School section No 1 be complied with and the sum of $150 be levied and collected on the rateable property of said section exclusive of expenses 1871
that the Trustees of School Section No 1 be paid the sum of $52.82 as balance of the amount levied and collected in said Section for school purposes and the clerk give an order for the same- 1872
that the application of trustees of school section No 1 Elizabethtown be complied with and the sum of $150 be levied and collected and the rateable property of said section for school purposes exclusive of expenses- 1872
that the Trustees of School No 1 be paid the sum of $150 dollars being the amount levied on said section for School purposes and the Clerk order the sae to be paid to Alexander Miller- 1873
that $36 dollars of Clergy money be divided amongst the School Sections of this Township in the following manner, namely Sections No 1 $10, No 12 $5, No 26 $9, No 27 $9.31 cents, No 28 $5, No 29 $2, No 30 $5, No 31 $6 bring union section all the full Sections will leave the sum of $13.11 cents each and the Clerk ? the sum to be paid to the Trustees of each School Section- 1873
that the Trustees of School Section No 1 be paid the sum of $150 dollars being payment of the amount collected on said section for school purposes and the Clerk order the same to be paid to the Trustees[2] – 1873

[1] The History of Elizabethtown by Alvyn Austin 2002

[2] Lyn Museum Archives

Row’s Corners – A One Room School House in Elizabethtown

Row’s Corners

rowes-corners-school-1861-62-map
Location of Rowe’s Corners School – Map 1861-62

(School Section # 4)

 

This is all the information we have on this school. If anyone as any additional information or photos on this school we would appreciate hearing from you.

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Frame building, constructed in 1832, condition: Good

1854: Stone building first opened in 1846

 

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

That the sum of $73. clear of all expenses be levied and collected on the rateable property of school section No 4.-1862
that the application of the trustees of School Section No 4 be received and laid over for further consideration- 1868
that the Trustees of School Section No 4 of Elizabethtown be paid to Samuel McNish agreeable to the request of the Trustees of said Section- 1871
To the Municipal Council of the Township of Elizabethtown in Council assembled, Gentlemen, Please pay Samuel McNish the sum due School Section No 4 of Elizabethtown, signed Sidney Easton and Cyrus Wright- 1871
that James Daniels and John Daniels be relieved from paying School Tax to School Section No 4 amounting to $6.66 cents as said Daniels belong to the Separate School in Brockville and the collector get a copy of this motion- 1872[1]

[1] Lyn Museum Archives

Rock Springs – A One Room School House in Elizabethtown

Rock Springs School

(School Section #25 – Elizabethtown)

(School Section # 19 – Kitley)

rock-springs-school-1861-62-map
Location of school on a map from 1861-62

 

This is all the information we have on this school If anyone has inforation or photos we would appreciate hearing from you.

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: no report

1854: no report

 

Read’s School – A One Room School House in Elizabethtown

Read’s School

(School Section 2- Elizabethtown)

(School Section 30 – Augusta)

 

Read’s Public School, a log structure, was built in 1831 and served the community of Bethel for nearly 50 years until a stone building was erected in 1880 on the same plot of land. The land had originally been donated by UEL Pioneer Guy Carleton Read (1785-1849), The Read family gave their name to the school and the nearby Read’s cemetery which dates back to 1800.

The original log school was also used by Methodist circuit riders for church services.

Among the early teachers were Jehiel Collins, in the early 1800’s; William Garvey around 1820; John Walker 1854; Tom Henderson 1855; Catherine Wright 1858 and many others. The school was located in Bethel.

(Recorder and Times, Darling Scrapbook Collection Book 3 pgs 17-29)

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Frame building, 28×30 in size, constructed in 1810, condition: Good

1854: Stone building first opened in 1853

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

that the request of the Trustees of School Section No 2 be complied with and that the sum of $160.00 clear of all expenses be levied and collected on the assessed rateable property of said school section for school purposes for the current year 1867
That the request of the trustees of School Section No 2 be complied with that the sum of two hundred dollars be levied and collected on the rateable property of said section exclusive of expenses- 1869
that the Clerk order the treasurer to pay the Trustees of School Section No 2 or their order the sum of $160 as part payment of the amount due said section- 1870
that the application of the Trustees of School section No 2 be complied with and the sum of Two hundred and forty dollars be levied and collected on the taxable property of said section exclusive of expenses-1871
that the application of School Trustees Section No 2 be complied with and the sum of $240 be levied and collected on the Taxable property of said section exclusive of expenses 1872[1]

[1] Lyn Museum Archives

reads-sch-100th-anniv-in-1981-darling-bk3
100th Anniversary 1981
reads-public-1921
Read’s School Class of 1921
reads-school-c1900-darling-bk3-1
Read’s School Class c1900

“Edna’s Scrapbook”

is a paperback book written by Edna B. Chant and was published in 1998. Edna Chant was a reported with the “Athens Reporter” for 23 years and she is the author of four books.

Her book, which is made up of news clippings from various sources, from which we have taken excerpts, gives us a glimpse into life in our area for over a hundred year period ending with stories from 1975.

While her book covers many areas of Leeds and Grenville we have only focused on the area within Elizabethtown-Kitley Township.

Read’s School

One of the oldest schools in the area is Read’s Stone schoolhouse which has been preserved in good repair. The very first school in the district was built in 1830 of logs. In 1880 it was replaced by the stone school and it served the district for 82 years, being closed in 1962. The school as well as the pioneer cemetery nearby was named after the Read Family. Guy Landon Read once owned an inn here. After the school was closed, it was purchased by Miss. Athalie H.M.Read who attended school here from 1923 to 1930. Guy Carleton Read once owned the land on which the school stands. Reads is located on the third concession of Augusta Township. The first teacher in the old log school was Johiel H.Collins. The first teacher in the stone school was Isabella Ross. The last teacher was Mrs. Horton Tanney.

 

Read’s School- May, 2017 photo by Hans-Ulrich Raffelt

 

 

 

 

Moore’s – A One Room School House in Elizabethtown

Moore’s School

(School Section #21)

 

 

We have no additional information about this school. If anyone has any information or photos, we would appreciate hearing from you.

 

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Log building, 20×26 in size, constructed in 1850, condition: Good

1854: Stone building first opened in 1832

 

 

Mead’s – A One Room School House in Elizabethtown

Mead’s

Sectional School No. 14

We have very little information on this school. If anyone has any information or photos we would appreciate hearing from you.

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Frame Building, construction date 1826, condition: Good

1854: Stone building, first opened in 1820

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

that the sum of three dollars and fifty cents be paid to trustees of School Section No 14 of Elizabethtown as uncollectable and the clerk order the same to be paid Benjamin Frances 1873[1]

[1] Lyn Museum Archives

Maud’s – A One Room School House in Eizabethtown

Maud’s School

(School Section No. 18)

 

We have very little information on this school. If anyone has any information or photos we would appreciate hearing from you.

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Stone Building, size 28×38, construction date 1830, condition: Good

1854: Log building, first opened in 1819

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

That Edward Davis be detached from school section no 18 and be attached to school section no 20-1858
That the request of the trustees of School Section No 18 be accepted and that the sum of $60. be levied and collected on the rateable property of said section for school purposes-1862
that the petition of the trustees of School Section No 18 be complied with and the sum of Thirty dollars be levied and collected on the assessed rateable property of said section free of all expenses for school purposes and paid to the trustees of said section- 1867
That the request of the trustees of School Section No 18 be complied with that the sum of sixty five dollars be levied and collected on the rateable property of said section exclusive of expenses-1869
that the application of the Trustees of School section No 18 be complied with and the sum of Eighty dollars be levied and collected on the rateable property of said section exclusive of expenses-1871
that the application of School Trustees Section No 18 be complied with and the sum of $100 dollars be levied and collected on the Taxable property of said section exclusive of expenses-1872[1]

[1] Lyn Museum Archives

Manhard’s – A One Room School House in Elizabethtown

Manhards School

(School Section # 13)

manhard-school-1861-62-map
Location of school on a map from 1861-62

We have no information on this school. If anyone has any informaion or photos we would appreciate hearing from you.

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Stone Building, size 18×24, construction date 1847, condition: Good

1854: Stone building, first opened in 1844

 

Jellby – A One Room School House in Eizabethtown

Jellby School

(School Section # 22)

jellby-school-1861-62-map
Location of Jellby School – Map of 1861-62

 

We have no information about this school, if anyone has any information or photos we would appreciate hearing from you.

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: No Report

1854: Stone building, first opened in 1826

 

Kitley – The Early Years

Kitley –  The Early Years

elizabethtown-kitley-master-1800-map-1-copy
Kitley Township

When the United Empire Loyalists travelled up the St. Lawrence River in their bateaux, Durham Boats and canoes, in 1784 to claim their new homesteads, Kitley Township was still a wilderness, inhabited only occasionally by nomadic Indian tribes on hunting and fishing expeditions.

While UEL pioneers were settling along the riverfront townships, the future township of Kitley was undeveloped and uninhabited.

Edwardsburgh, Augusta and Elizabethtown were first settled, but north of these new townships, dense forests stretched to the Rideau River and beyond.

The land had formerly been Indian Territory, though the natives used it only for occasional hunting and fishing expeditions. They had no permanent settlements such as those which once existed in Augusta Township. The Iroquois had a number of trails running through the wild forest which covered the area, the paths starting at the St. Lawrence and winding up in the Rideau District.

French Canadian fur traders also criss-crossed the area but left no permanent camps to mark their passage.

gov-haidimand
Gov. Frederick Haidimand

In 1790, Governor Frederick Haidimand, a British army general, ordered surveys of the lands north of the settled townships.

Survey parties under Lt. Gersham French and Capt. James Sherwood of Jessop’s Rangers, examined the area which was to become Kitley and found it suitable for habitation and settlement. They were impressed by the numerous mill sites found along inland streams.

The actual survey of Kitley was delayed for seven years until 1797. In the meantime, Kitley had its first settler, a pioneer farmer named James Finch. With his family, James Finch settled on what was later to become Lot No. 29 in the 7th Concession.

The Pioneer Upper Canada Surveyor, Lewis Grant, laid out the lines of Kitley Township in 1797. It consisted of approximately 100 square miles of dense forest. For some reason, probably because its northern end was closer to the Rideau Canal than to the St. Lawrence, for shipping purposes, the concessions ran from north to south rather than from south to north as in Elizabethtown and Augusta Townships.

But Grant and his helpers laid out the township from the south starting with Concession 10. When they reached the Northern end they discovered that Concession 1 was only half as wide as the other nine. That’s why Concession One is narrower than the others and has fewer lots.

Marking off the Lots, the surveyors started at no. 30 in the west and worked their way eastward, then discovered another major error; they actually ran out of room! As a result, this mistake by the surveyors robbed Kitley of the first three lots in every concession. Starting in the west with Lot No. 30, Lot No. 4 is the most easterly. Lots numbers 1, 2 and 3 do not exist!

Later surveys show No. 22 to be a reserve lot. James Finch who had already cleared five acres on Lot No.22 moved over to Lot No. 21. (Possibly before anything was officially signed.)

Both lots lie along the road which became the main street of Toledo. Although Mr. Finch erected a log cabin, dug a well, and cleared 16 acres on Lot No. 21, his claim to the land was disputed by the government.

The Kitley census of 1800 lists James Finch as a settler, but he is missing from the count in 1804. Historians believe that he got fed up with government delays in approving his claim and left the area in disgust.

Irishmen formed the backbone of old Kitley Township 150 years ago, and this tiny farming community boasted a fair sampling of sons of Erin (Ireland) along with UEL folk, some of whom came from the deep south of the United States.

In the 1820’s, Irish, English and Scottish settlers flooded into Kitley, helped by free passage over the Atlantic, guaranteed by the government and an offer of 100 acres of free land per family.

After the great Irish migration of the 1830’s and 1840’s to Canada, when the Irish fled their homeland to escape the ravages of droughts and famine, Kitley folk numbered 3,565 souls. There were 962 citizens from Ireland or of Irish extraction as well as 67 Scots, 61 Englishmen, 93 Yankees, 24 Quebecois, 15 Maritimer’s, one German and one East Indian. As well, over 2,000 of these residents were native Indians who still hunted in the hills and valleys and along the lakes and creeks.

Kitley Township was named after Kitley, Devonshire, England, home of a British M.P. John Bastard and the township of Bastard was named after the M.P. himself.

Abel Stevens, the Baptist elder who colonized Bastard and parts of Kitley, listed 39 families in Kitley in 1798.He didn’t mention James Finch but listed two sons, Richard and Henry Finch.

Toldeo researchers found that James Finch had been granted 200 acres on Lot No. 22 on May 22, 1801, but Finch sold the property the next year to Hugh McIlmoyl, who then sold to Eben Estes the same year. After several more transactions the lot came into possession of Wyatt Chamberlain, the founder of the village.

Wyatt Chamberland, a retired preacher, called this settlement Camberlain’s Corners. He opened the first store in a log cabin. Rev. Chamberland also built the first frame dwelling in the area, was the first postmaster and became a justice of the peace. His first wife was Catherine Halleck, daughter of pioneer missionary Rev. William Halleck, for whom Halleck’s Road, west of Brockville was named.

Chamberland’s Corners officially became Toledo in 1856. The village was named after Toledo in Spain, scene of a British victory over a French army in the Spanish Campaign of 1813.

In 1851, Kitley boasted 3,525 souls, men outnumbering women by only 25. There were 962 residents Irish or of Irish extraction and only 24 French speaking citizens. 91 were from the United States and 128 from England, Scotland and Wales.

The township listed 540 families living in 529 homes. The dwellings were said to consist of 32 in stone, 81 frame, 300 log cabin style and 110 shanties.

The Township of Kitley, in Leeds and Grenville County, Ontario, was incorporated effective January 1, 1850 under the terms of the Baldwin Act, Chapter 81, Canada Statutes, 1849.

James Graham was elected the first Reeve. Hiram McCrea took over the reeve ship in 1861. He lost to William Bell in 1862-63 but regained the position in 1864-66.

Kitley has grown and waned over the years and remains today a busy township, with a number of enterprising communities contributing to the well-being of Eastern Ontario.

(Recorder and Times c1985, Darling Collection Book 5)

 

Absentee Land Owners Plagues Early Kitley

Absentee land-lords were the plague of Kitley’s early days and were in a large measure responsible for the delayed development on the township.

Hon. William D. Powell chief justice of Upper Canada, already a wealthy man, became even richer with the grant of 1,200 acres in Kitley in 1797. He never saw an acre but simply held on to the land until the time was ripe for an enormous profit. Then he sold his 1,200 acres in parcels. He also got 1,200 acres for his wife, and sold those lots as well.

Another man who never saw his land was Major Hazelton Spencer, who lived in Niagara but was granted 1,200 acres of Kitley land. He sold at a good profit without ever visiting the site.

There were many large grants of land which eventually were sold to give the owners a good profit.

(Recorder and Times c1985, Darling Collection Book 5)

 

The First Mill

Joseph Haskins, the first miller in these parts, settled on the future site of Jasper in 1802. At that time, Irish Lake was a muddy swamp or marsh, drained by Irish Creek which turned into the Rideau River, north of Haskins’ Mill.

Mr. Haskins dammed the creek near his homestead then used the dam water to run a grist mill he erected. A sawmill followed and pretty soon a hamlet grew up around the homestead.

Damming of the creek backed up water to form a lake where the marsh land had existed. The name Irish Lake was given to this body of water.

Haskins’ Dam created such a body of water that when Col. John By’s surveyors were laying out the route of the proposed Rideau Canal in 1825, they seriously considered running the new waterway down Irish Creek, through Irish Lake and thence westward to Bellamy’s Mills, now Toledo. However the prospect of having to cut through high ground west from Toledo, deterred the surveyors and further tests on Irish Lake indicated some six feet of mud would have to be excavated over the entire length of the lake to make a channel feasible.

The Irish Creek – Irish Lake idea was abandoned and the surveyors laid out the canal route past the estuary of Irish Creek on to Smith’s Falls, eventually cresting the height of land at Newboro and then going downhill along the Cataraqui River to Kingston.

First called Irish Creek, the village became Jasper when postal service was inaugurated in the late 1830’s.

The Livingston’s were also millers and among the first to provide their neighbours with milled flour. Later the Bellamy Brothers put up grist mills and sawmills on Bellamy Pond. (Recorder and Times c1985, Darling Collection Book 5)

 

Early Religion

The ‘old time’ Methodist circuit riders brought religion to Kitley’s pioneers by horseback. In 1818 the good folks of Kitley organized their first Methodist congregation.

Up until that point, these circuit riders had been holding Sunday services in various homesteads. Records show that Reverend Ezra Healey conducted worship in 1818 at the home of Alex McClure.

Four families formed the first Methodist Society. They were the families of Duncan Livingston, Jonathon Lyman, Horace Tupper and Ephraim Koyl.

Kitley’s first Methodist Church was erected in 1839 in Toledo by Alex McLean and George Marshall, the builders.

The Presbyterian congregation was organized in 1843 and a church was built shortly thereafter.

In 1830, the Roman Catholics built a church at Belamy Mills. (Kitley).  Irish settlers contributed their labour in the construction and formed the largest segment of the parish. (Recorder and Times c1985, Darling Collection Book 5)

 

Cheese Factories

When there was a surplus of milk in the early days, it was used for making butter. The surplus butter was packed in wooden tubs or boxes and taken to market in the autumn or early winter.

About a century ago, in response to a demand in the British market, there was a shift from butter making to cheese making.

To make Cheddar Cheese it was necessary to have a factory, with considerable equipment, to which the farmer could deliver milk daily. The first item of equipment was a steam boiler to provide heat to the vat in which the cheese making took place. Therefore the factory had to be located where there was a reliable source of water.

There have been ten factories in Kitley or on its boundaries, although they were not all in operation at the same time.

The Ross Factory was later removed to Newbliss and McAndrew’s Factory was located at the intersection of the Bastard Town Line and the Fourth Concession before Donovan’s was established. Bellamy’s Cheese Factory was  first located under the hill, and later beside the pond. Cameron’s Factory was located at Shane’s and Moore’s was near Eloida and Frankville, Crystal and Jasper.

When Robert T. Beckett came to Kitley in the late 1890’s, he helped to organize what was known as Donovan’s Factory. About 1900 he left Johnnie Donovan in charge there and came to Newbliss. He was a man who tried to lead the way to brighter things.

The Newbliss Factory consisted of three frame buildings. The factory proper is still in use as a store. The curing room has been moved across the road and made into a garage and dwelling. Directly behind the main building was the boiler room.

The weighing-in stand was under a canopy facing the highway. The cans of milk were raised by a hand operated hoist, which was later replaced by one run by steam power. The milk cans were of the thirty gallon size, which held up to three hundred pounds, or the forty gallon size which had a capacity of four hundred pounds.

From the scales, the milk passed through a conductor pipe and a strainer, made from several piles of cotton, into a vat. When the vat was filled to a certain level and heated to a prescribed temperature, rennet was added, and also colouring, in the case of coloured cheese. The additives were thoroughly mixed with the milk and then the vat was covered and allowed to set.

In due time the curd was cut and the whey drained off. Next, the curd was washed, salted and placed in the press. Enough curd was put into the press to yield a cheese weighing between ninety and one hundred pounds after the air and moisture had been squeezed out. The cylindrical block of cheese had a skin made of cotton gauze known as a cheese cloth.

The blocks of cheese were placed on tables in the curing room, where they were kept at a constant temperature for a period of some weeks. When ready for shipment they were placed in cylindrical wooden containers, known as cheese boxes. Protected by a thin coat of paraffin wax, the cheese could withstand the moderate changes of temperature but would be damaged by freezing.

Usually the factory patrons took turns hauling the cheese to the railway station, from where it was shipped to the Brockville Cheese Board.

When Wilfred Bruce was running the factory he lacked only a few cents of having a thousand dollars for making cheese in the month of June. He was being paid about four cents a pound, so he must have produced about 25,000 pounds of cheese. (Recorder and Times article dated March 15, 1967) (Recorder and Times c1985, Darling Collection Book 5)

 

Excerpts from “Leeds Grenville: their first two hundred years” by Ruth McKenzie pub. 1967

We come to Kitley bounded by Wolford on the east and South Elmsley on the north. Kitley is an inland township watered by tributaries of the Rideau (Irish Creek and Hutton Creek), but not extending as far north as the main Rideau River.

Most of the early settlers in Kitley drew their land on the seventh, eighth or ninth concession, the three lines nearest to Elizabethtown to the south. Some of these early settlers were Baptists who came to Canada with Able Stevens, founder of Bastard Township. Among the names of the pioneers who arrived before 1800 were Read, Livingston and Soper.

The first of the Read family (also spelled Reed) was Major William Read, a Loyalist who settled in New Brunswick after the American Revolution and then came up the St. Lawrence to Upper Canada towards the end of the century. He drew 400 acres of land in Kitley, a 200 acre lot on the eighth concession, where he lived and another on the seventh. Major Reed became a leader in the community and, in the years preceding the War of 1812, he trained a band of some sixty volunteers for the war he feared was coming. Among the volunteers were his three sons, one of whom, William Junior, became a Captain in the War of 1812.

When Major Read died in 1828 at 79 years of age, he was buried on his farm in what is now an abandoned cemetery “small, dilapidated and overgrown with prickly ash”, as it was described recently.

 

Providence Chapel

Providence Chapel at Crystal

Methodists worshipped anywhere they could find shelter, a barn being used on more than one occasion but in 1834, the congregation built a log chapel on the eastern edge of Kitley Township in the community known as Crystal and the church subsequently bore the name “Providence Chapel”.

The church was used until church union in 1935 when it was sold to a local resident who in turn donated it in 1960 to Upper Canada Village.

In October 2016, Upper Canada Village allowed us access to the chapel for photographs. They told us that the only original feature on the inside of the building is the pulpit and railing. The pews were added but reflected the pews in use at the time.

 

providence-chapel-2
Front Door of the Providence Chapel (2016)
providence-chapel-7
Side View Providence Chapel at Upper Canada Village, October 2016
providence-chapel-8
Rear view of Providence Chapel
providence-chapel-10
Providence Chapel October 2016
providence-chapel-9
Side View of the Providence Chapel October 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

providence-chapel-20
Inside the Providence Chapel
providence-chapel-15
Looking to the front of the Chapel and the original pulpit
providence-chapel-16
The original pulpit
providence-chapel-1
Looking from the pulpit to the back of the chapel
providence-chapel-18
Interior of the Providence Chapel at Upper Canada Village October 2016

 

Montgomery House

The Montgomery Log House

The Montgomery House was moved to a site on Highway 29 just north of the main Frankville intersection where it remained for many years. A popular misconception was that this was the original home of Louise Crummy McKinney,  her home still exists on the Lake Eloida Road.

The Montgomery Cabin was originally on the 188 Line 8 Frankville property originally owned by Joseph Montgomery. Joseph and his wife are buried on this property in the late 1800’s.

The log house was moved to Upper Canada Village where it has been refurbished on the inside into a very comfortable and modern cabin. It is used to house students who spend time at the village during the summer months, it can also be rented out to families who want to spend extra time experiencing life at Upper Canada Village.

We appreciate Upper Canada Village allowing us access to the building and allowing us the opportunity of sharing these photos.

 

montgomery-cabin-frankville-c1985-1
The log house when it was in Frankville c1985
montgomery-cabin-frankville-c1985-2
The log house in Frankville c1985

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

montgomery-house-3
Upper Canada Village October 2016
montgomery-house-4
Upper Canada Village October 2016
montgomery-house-5
Washrooms and showers have been added in the addition to the right

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

montgomery-house-10
Downstairs interior kitchen area October 2016
montgomery-house-9
Downstairs area October 2016
montgomery-house-8
Downstairs Area October 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

montgomery-house-12
Upstairs Sleeping area October 2016
montgomery-house-14
Upstairs sleeping area 2016
montgomery-house-1
Upstairs sleeping area 2016

The log Cabin originally stool on the Montgomery property on Kitley Line 8

Map of 1861-62

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Montgomery’s are buried in a private grave on their original farm.

Joseph Montgomery Sr Dec 23 1883 @ 93yrs

 

Margaret Montgomery Mar 20 1869 @ 82yrs 

 

 

 

Confusion about the connection between Louise Crummy and the Montgomery Cabin

 

The Plaque Reads as Follows: Louise C. McKinney (1868-1931) Born on a nearby farm Louise Crummy taught school in Leeds County and in 19896 married James McKinney. In 1903 they settled in Claresholm Alberta. A leader in the temperance movement and strong advocate of female suffrage she was elected as an Independent member of the Alberta legislature in 1907. She thus became the first woman in the British Empire to gain a parliamentary seat.

 

In 1967 a plaque was erected in front of the Montgomery House to honour Louise Crummy McKinney, who was born in the Frankville area. Unfortunately the placement of this plaque in front of the Mongtomery Cabin, led many to believe that this cabin was the birthplace of Louise Crummy.

This cabin was not her birthplace.

 

 

 

 

Sherwood Cemetery

Sherwood Cemetery

Concession 1, Lot 1 Location: behine 1937 Hwy 2, on the eastern boundary of Elizabethtown, on Burnside Road Alternate Cemetery Name: Old Thomas Sherwood Family Cemetery – Twp of Elizabethtown* GPS- 44.614576, -75.643404

 

picture2
Photo Fall of 2013
picture1
Photo Fall of 2013
picture4
Photo Fall of 2013
picture3
Photo Fall of 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

List of Graves

Martha wife of James Sherwood

Nov. 29, 1865 – aged 75 yrs.

James Sherwood

Not legible

Jane M wife of Thos. Sherwood

Oct. 7, 1805 – Nov. 12, 1894

Thos. Sherwood

Aug. 9, 1813 – Mar. 27, 1895

Sherwood – not legible

Elizabeth G. Dire wife of Henry J. Arnold

May 29, 1852 age 23

 

Horton Cemetery

Horton Cemetery

6539 New Dublin Rd, cor 7th Concession, in field On Private Land, Cemetery Status: Closed to further burials – Twp of Elizabethtown*  GPS- 44.667882, -75.795032

 

horton-cemetery-b-gibson-2013-7
Frederick Moore 1770-1848

 

Frederick Moore Sr. 1770-1848

Eliza Bolton 1773-1815

NCO Irish Yoeman Calvary

Q.M. Sgt. War 1812

Ensign 1st Leeds Militia

 

horton-cemetery-b-gibson-2013-1
William Moore 1740-1820

 

 

William Moore 1740-1820

Married in Dublin c1766

Frances Proctor c1714-c1816

Member Barbers-Surgeons Guild

Yeoman Loyalist Co. Wexford 1798

Arrived Aug 1817 Younge Twp

 

 

horton-cemetery-b-gibson-2013-2
Photo Fall of 2013
horton-cemetery-b-gibson-2013-3
Photo Fall of 2013
horton-cemetery-b-gibson-2013-4
Photo Fall of 2013
horton-cemetery-b-gibson-2013-5
Photo Fall of 2013
horton-cemetery-b-gibson-2013-6
Photo Fall of 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Horton Cemetery

List of internment’s

  1. Sarah Moore who died Jan 20, 1816 in the 18th year of her age (footstone, small marker)
  2. Foot Stone (E.M.)
  3. Frederick Moore, Sr. who died Sep 4, 1848 in the ?? year, b.1770
  4. George Thompson, Born in Co. Tyrone Ireland, died in Elizabethtown, Oct 2, 1840 at 84 yrs
  5. George Evans, who died August 1856, age 21 yrs & 8 mos
  6. Ellen Maud, wife of James Astleford, who died Mar 28 1874 aged 36 yrs, 3 mo, 24 days
  7. Hannah Cockral, wife of Henry Maud who died Aug 30, 1857 aged 60 yrs
  8. Susan, wife of Henry Maud, who died Mar 23, 1874 aged 72 yrs, also her Grand-daughter Margaret Akice. (Erected by her daughter Sarah Astleford)
  9. Adam Horton, d Aug 29, 1861, Ann wife of Adam Horton d Aug. 7 1856 aged 70 years (Stone Broken)
  10. Willm. Davis d July 15, 1868 age 80 years
  11. Jane daughter of Willm & E.Davis died Oct 10, 1855 age 27 yrs
  12. Caroline A., dau’r of John & Caroline A. Shannon died Aug. 11, 1870 aged 4 yrs, 3 mos & 6 days
  13. Rev. James Samuel Evans, died July 24, 1910 aged 78 yrs, 7 mos, 1 day
  14. John Evans, died Juy 29, 1885 aged 85 years 28 d’s also his wife Mary Ann Thompson died Feb 18, 1890 aged 90 yrs. Natives of Drummond, Tyrone Co., Ireland
  15. Delorma, son of George and Lucinda Evans died Nov 11, 18??, age 2 yrs
  16. William James, son of W.J. & C.Cooper, died June 11, 1897 age 33 yrs, 3mos
  17. William Baker, 1845-1913
  18. John Horton died Aug 18, 1905 aged 93 yrs, 7 mos.
  19. Ann Maud wife of John Horton died March 1, 1894 aged 69 years & 10 months
  20. James Astleford, born Aug 19, 1838 died Aug 129, 1892, his wife Ann Horton born Feb 27, 1851 died Jan 8 1935
  21. Jane Astleford, wife of Henry Maud, died Sep 17, 1905, aged 68 yrs, Henry Maud born April 15, 1840, died March 8, 1913

 

 

Scott’s Farm Cemetery (Campbell Cemetery)

Scott’s Cemetery – Campbell Cemetery

Concession 10, Lot 4, Cty Rd 7 to Atkins Lake Rd before the county line (Alternate names: Mrs. Scott’sFarm, Scott’s Farm Cemetery)

scott-campbell-pic2
Photo Fall 2013
scott-campbell-pic1
Photo Fall 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

List of Graves: 

Inserted “?” if not legible

 

JELLY, William John

Died May 16, 1909 age 46 yrs. 4 mos.

 

 

CAMPBELL, George

Died 1890 age 72 yrs

CAMPBELL, Jane

Died May 23, 1897 age 52

Maria, wife of George

Died June 14, 1890 age 7?

 

 

CAMPBELL, George A, sone of George & Maria

Feb. 9, 1855 – July 2, 1928

Maria Melissa, wife of W.J. Jelly

1859 – 1951

 

 

 

 

Week’s Cemetery

Week’s Cemetery

Concession: 2, Lot: 25/26; Location: next to 2418 Murphy Road; Cemetery Status: Closed to further burials  – Unregistered Cemetery- on Private Property–  GPS- 44-583896, -75.760260

 

img_0475
Photo 2012
img_0474
Photo 2012

 

WEEKS, Neoma (wife of John Weeks) – died 1851 at age 70 yrs

 

 

Sanford / Loverin Burying Ground

Sanford / Loverin Burying Ground

Concession 9, Lot 26-27), Location: West of Greenbush, 9330 Addison Greenbush Rd, north side- Twp of Elizabethtown* GPS not available

 

david-and-wealtha-sanford
David Morton Sanford d Jun 12, 1912 age 53 years (R) Wealtha Hurlbert, wife of David Morton d Jun 21 1893 age 34y,8mo,6days (L)
sanford-loverin-cemetery-photo-2011-1
Photo taken 2011
sanford-loverin-cemetery-photo-2011-2
Photo taken 2011
sanford-loverin-cemetery-photo-2011-4
Photo 2011
sanford-loverin-cemetery-photo-2011-3
Photo 2011
sanford-loverin-cemetery-photo-2011-6
Photo 2011
sanford-loverin-cemetery-photo-2011-5
Photo 2011
sanford-loverin-cemetery-photo-2011-7
Simeon Loverin 1834-1913, his wife Margaret Alguire 1844-10928

Graves:

 

David Morton Sanford

Died June 2, 1912

Aged 53 yrs.

Wealtha Hurlbert

Wife of David Morton

Died June 21, 1893

Aged 34 8 mos. 6 days

Margaret Alguire

1844 – 1928

Simeon Loverin

1834 k- 1913

Amanda Simeon Loverin

Died June 26, 1877

Loverin

illegible

Lucy Sanford

Died Sept. 3,, 1840

Illegible
Joseph Loverin

Died Feb. 21, 1815 (Baby)

Mother

illegible

Elizabeth wife of

Joseph Loverin

Died March 8, 1818

George Sanford

1844 k- 1926

Wife Eliza Hanes

1844 – 1930

Deleah wife of

David

Died Nov. 25, 1880

53 yrs.

White’s Corners – A Forgotten Hamlet in Elizabethtown

White’s Corners (Whitehurst and Orchard Valley)

 

1- 1861-62 Map of Elizabethtown

This forgotten community lies just east of Jellby, on the Jellby – North Augusta Road. The area is reached via the Greenbush Road to Greenbush, Rocksprings Road through its junction with the Jellby Road. Landmarks to look for are John Jelly’s old homestead and ¾ of a mile beyond that, Bill Jelly’s old home which is located at the exact centre of what was once White’s Corners.

The second cheese factory burned down around 1940, the old shingle mill vanished in decay over the years and the only reminder of what was White’s Corners is the former home of Bill Jelly. The cheese factory was known as The Orchard Valley Cheese Factory and was located across from what was Bill Jelly’s house. The Orchard Valley cheese factory was owned by Jim White and J. Cardwell Ferguson was the last operator when the factory burned down. In the 1930’s cheese was selling around 13¢ a pound

Few in the area recall the settlement that once flourished just east of Jellby, but the old Shiloh Church which served the settlers still rises majestically on Shiloh Road.

Originally four families of Whites settled in the area. They located east of where the Ottawa- Brockville CPR line was to run in later years and at their back door was the Augusta Township Line. They settled on the ninth and tenth concessions of Elizabethtown.

Joseph White was the first to settle, followed by his brothers Eli, Henry and George. On February 24, 1824, Joseph White fresh from his native Ireland, bought 100 acres of land on the west half of Lot No. 3 on the Tenth Concession , paying pioneer farmer Enoch Knowlton 100 pound sterling for the land.

Joseph White died February 20, 1835. The White’s are buried in the Bolton Cemetery.

The old Bolton School once stool on the property of Henry White. The school once stood near the Bolton Cemetery on Lot 5 of the Tenth Concession in Elizabethtown. There was also another school, Bell’s School, in the area that served the children’s educational needs. Bell’s school was located close to the Bell’s Cemetery.

The Bolton Cemetery was sometimes referred to as Whitehurst, from the name of a nearby railway crossing. Old maps show the crossing as Whitehurst and more modern maps call it Bell’s Crossing from the Bell families living around there. There was a post office nearby supplying the Jellyby area (Recorder and Tines, Darling Collection Book 3)

 

2- James White’s Cheese Factory at the corner of Jellyby Rd and Shilo Road

 

White’s Corners* 

as written by a descendant of John White

Lucy (Kilborn) White, was the wife of John White who died about 1817/18 at the age of 50 years.

After her husband’s death she and her sons moved to the northeast part of Elizabethtown in an area that borders on Augusta Township. Here they established a small village once known as “White’s Corners”. Lucy’s sons Eli and Henry settled on Lot 9 of the 9th Concession of Elizabethtown not far from the village of Jellby. In her later years Lucy lived with her son Joseph who had acquired land on Lot 10 of the 3rd Concession of Elizabethtown.

Lucy White lived into her eighties and when she died on March 15th, 1857 she was buried on Lot 5 of the 10th  Concession. She lies next to her son Joseph. Her stone reads “Lucy, wife of John White died (dates missing) age 84 years.

James White, the eldest son of Henry R.S. White and Sarah Berry, took over the family farm on the 9th Concession of Elizabethtown from his widowed mother probably when he was in his early twenties. The home lot on the 9th Concession was variously referred to as Whitehurst or Orchard Valley. It was here that James White constructed a cheese factory that became an important supplier of this product for the surrounding district.

According to Wilma White, a granddaughter of James White, “The Orchard Valley Cheese Factory was situated in a grove of apple trees on the corner of Shiloh and Jellyby Roads”. This corner was called appropriately. “Whites Corners. The original cheese factory burned down around the turn of the century (1900) and James White replaced it with another factory he purchased in a nearby community he called Roebuck. Unfortunately this factory also burned down in 1940, but this was long after the property had passed into the hands of the Jelly family.

“John Jelly recalls White’s Corners chiefly because of his son Bill Jelly who occupied the last home owned by the Whites here. His house was once the property of James White and at the rear doorstep lies a tombstone which once adorned the grave of Henry White in Bolton Cemetery.

The railway crossing a mile north of John Jelly’s farm is known as Bell’s Crossing, but more than 100 years ago it was called Whitehurst. There was a post office there supplying the Jellyby area” (Harry Painting “John Jelly recalls Paltry $37 Cheese Cheques” Brockville Recorder and Times March 27, 1981)

*Excerpts on White’s Corners are from the book “A White Family Odyssey 1635-1997, Massachusetts to British Columbia, Canada” by Robert White

Jellyby or Jellby- In researching this hamlet we have come across both spellings, and a sentence by someone that they never knew which was the correct spelling as Jellby was used by the old timers in the area.

3-W.H. Whites at Whites Corners was his first farm which he later sold when he moved to Greenbush

 

5-James and Annie White

 

4-Anna Pearson White

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6-James White’s Gingerbread Clock manufactured in Connecticut in the possession of his descendant Robert White

 

whites-cors-jim-white-home-darling-bk3p207
7-Jim White’s Home at Whites Corners c1980
whites-cors-sarah-ann-warren-white-1869-darling-bk3p207
9-Sarah Ann (Warren) White 1869
whites-cors-thomas-white-1869-darling-bk3p207
8-Thomas White 1869

 

Shiloh – A Forgotten Hamlet in Elizabethtown

Shiloh  (Bell’s Crossing)

The hamlet of Shiloh is located at the intersection of Shiloh Road and the road to Rocksprings.

The old Bolton School once stool on the property of Henry White. The school once stood near the Bolton Cemetery on Lot 5 of the Tenth Concession in Elizabethtown.

A Methodist church was built here in 1882. It was built by three Methodists congregations, Hill’s Chapel in the 9th Concession; a congregation that worshipped in the Bell’s Schoolhouse and another congregation that worshipped at Bolton’s School house. The beautiful red brick structure served the community well. It is located on the tenth concession of Elizabethtown at the intersection of the Shiloh Road with the Rocksprings Road. When the church was built in 1882 its’ postal address was Whitehurst, a nearby community which at that time had a post office. Whitehurst was used as a postal address until 1911 when rural mail delivery came into effect. Then the postal address was changed to Jellby. Nearby Boulton Cemetery was the actual burying ground for the Shiloh Church.

(Recorder and Times, Darling Collection Book 3)

 

shiloh-church-10863-shiloh-church-rd-july-2016-3
Shiloh Church- photo July 2016
shiloh-church-c1980-darling-bk3p191
Shiloh Church c1980 from the Recorder and Times

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

100th Anniversary Commemorative Plate for the Shilo United Church 1882-1982

 

shiloh-remains-of-old-cosgrove-home-darling-bk3p192
Remains of old Cosgrove Home c1980

 

 

The Athens Reporter and County of Leeds Advertiser

 Excerpts have been taken from this paper referencing the following hamlet for the years 1889, 1894 and 1895

Tuesday June 25, 1895 issue

Visitors –  Mrs. M. Kendrick and little daughter of Shilo is visiting friends here this week. (at New Dublin)

Bell’s Crossing – A Forgotten Hamlet in Elizabethtown

Bell’s Crossing (Shiloh, Whitehurst and White’s Corners)

 

“What was the neighbourhood at Bell’s Crossing called before the railway was put through there – was it Whitehurst? The name Whitehurst was simply the name of the post office, and as far as I can remember there was no post office bells-crossing-1861-62there before the railway (Brockville and Ottawa RR) was built. The name to most of us is a mystery, at the time many comments were made upon it. The reason generally given as to why it didn’t start with Bell was the railway said that there were already too many names starting with Bell.

 

Before the railway went through, the place was generally called the Bell Neighbourhood, and the school house always the Bell School house. The reason for this is that all the land around was owned by James Bell. The majority of all this land was simply wilderness when it was settled before 1831. There was a large section of wet swamp. The area where the railway went was practically filled with the original logs mixed with clay and some stone. What we called the ‘Island’ was surrounded by swamp through which a log road was built to drive over. Atkin’s Lake down to Cranberry was a big stream of water in which we all washed our sheep, and the boys would often go there to have a good bath.

 

As for the Shiloh Church, this Methodist Church was built after the church union of 1871 when the Wesleyan and New Connexion [sic] Methodist Churches became the Methodist Church of Canada. The Wesleyan Methodist Church worshipped in Bolton’s School House in what we commonly called ‘the Berry Neighbourhood’. After union these two congregations merged into one and built the Shiloh Church in a central place for all to come together for worship. This church was built upon the Moore property.” (Recorder and Times Letter to the editor, no date)

bells-school-ss24-1937-good-3
Bell’s School taken in 1937
bells-school-ss24-1937-good-1
Bell’s School class of 1937

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

bells-cemetery-11654-rocksprings-rd-july-2016-3
Bell’s Cemetery next to the school photo 2016
bells-crossing-august-2016-3
Bell’s Cemetery taken 2016
bells-cemetery-11654-rocksprings-rd-july-2016-2
Bell’s Cemetery on the Rocksprings Road next to the school
bell-cemetery-by-b-gibson-2015-4
Bell’s Cemetery photo fall of 2015

 

 

 

Kerr Family Cemetery

Kerr Family Cemetery

Concession 9, Lot 25, Location: East side of County Road 7, just north of Greenbush, behind #9472 Cty Rd. 7, – Twp of Elizabethtown* – GPS- 44.701591, 75.858257

kerr-cemetery-photo-b-gibson-2012-2
photo 2012
kerr-cemetery-photo-b-gibson-2012-1
photo 2012
kerr-cemetery-photo-b-gibson-2012-4
photo 2012
kerr-cemetery-photo-b-gibson-2012-5
photo 2012
kerr-cemetery-photo-b-gibson-2012-3
photo 2012
kerr-cemetery-photo-b-gibson-2012-6
photo 2012
kerr-cemetery-photo-b-gibson-2012-7
photo 2012

 

 

List of Graves: 

 

Inserted “?” if not legible

 

KERR, Susan (daughter of George & Eleanor) – died February 5, 1863

KERR, Charlotte – 1841 to 1914

KERR, George – died 1881 at age 82 yrs.

KERR, Eleanor – died 1890 at age 76 yrs.

KERR, Elizabeth – 1839 to 1895

 

??, Sarah – not legible

 

YOUNG, Herbert H. – died 1898 at age 37 yrs.

 

YOUNG, John – died 1890 at age 83 yrs.

 

KERR, Susannah (wife of Michael Kerr) – died 1856 at age 43 yrs.

 

KERR, Edward – died 1839 at age 74 yrs.

 

KERR, Susannah (wife of Edward) – died 1851 at age 85 yrs.

 

CAVANAGH, Martin – died 1879 at age 61 yrs.

 

CAVANAGH, Margaret (wife of Martin) – died 1888 at age 90 yrs.

 

YOUNG, Humphrey R. (son of H.B. & S.) – died 1819 at 12 mos.

 

YOUNG, Maragret (wife of E.A. Horton) – 1859 to 1905

 

KERR, Jane (wife of John Young) – 1826 to 1892

 

HOSKINS, Joab – died 1892 at age 70 yrs.

HOSKINS, George – died 1870 at age 20 yrs.

HOSKINS, Abigail – died 1883 at age 9 yrs.

HOSKINS, Edward J. – died 1883 at age 9 yrs.

 

Hill Cemetery

Hill Cemetery

Concession: 10, Lot: 10; Location: north side of the Jellby Road, next to 10724 Jellby Rd. – Twp of Elizabethtown*, GPS- 44.741193, -75.803239

 

hill-cemetery-photos-b-2
Hill Cemetery Entrance photo Nov 2012

 

 

hill-cemetery-photos-b-4
Photo Nov 2012
hill-cemetery-photos-b-5
Photo Nov 2012
hill-cemetery-photos-b-3
Photo Nov 2012
hill-cemetery-photos-b-1
Photo Nov 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

George White – Died Juy 29, 1879 age 78 yrs
In Memory of Mary wife of George White, Died June 22, 1899, Aged 85 yrs & 10 mos “Gone but not forgotten”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In Memory of Maria Daughter of George & Mary White who died Sept 2, 1859 Aged 3 yrs, 6 ms, 4 days

 

Jane, Daughter of George White Died Feb 6, 1866, age 26 y, 7 mos & 12 D

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

L to R- Jane, George and May White

List of Graves: 

Inserted “?” if not legible

CANNON, James – died 1898 at age 72 yrs.

CANNON, Alice Armstrong (wife of James) – died 1912 at age 75 yrs.

CANNON, Priscilla (daughter of James and Alice) – died 1898 at age 38 yrs.

MCCULLY, Ann Elizabeth – died 1855 at age ?

MCCULLY, Andrew – died 1898 at age 73 yrs.

MCCULLY, Rebecca (wife of Andrew) – died 1868 at age 40 yrs.

HILL, Thomas – died 1855 at age 66 yrs.

HILL, Elizabeth – died 1870 at age 74 yrs.

CONDELL, Priscilla – died at 1803 at ?

HILL, Catherine – died ??

CONDELL, John

HILL, Thomas – died 1810 at age 87 yrs.

HILL, Olive L – died 1881 at age ??

Name not legible – died 1819

HILL, Richard – died 1885 at age 48 yrs.

WIFE Eliza Jane – died 1871 at age 39 yrs.

WIFE Elizabeth Cornell – 1849 to 1934

CORNELL, James

HILL, Rolland (son of Thomas & Mary) – died 1818 (may be incorrect) at age 11 yrs.

HILL, Thomas Henry – 1858 to 1915

WIFE Mary Bissell – 1854 to 1936

HILL, George Edward – died 1900 at age 37 yrs.

HILL, William – died 1902 at age 82 yrs.

HOPKINS, Francis Jamima – died 1898 at age 80 yrs.

Mrs. Norton Hill – July 1896 at age 23 yrs.

HILL,  ?? – 1860 – 1933

TURNER, Jessie A.- 1865 to 1961

GIBSON, Rebecca Hill Armstrong – died 1941 at age 69 yrs.

GIBSON, James – 1872 to 1950

ARMSTRONG, Sarah Eliza (daughter of Robert and Mary Armstrong) – died 18?? At age 33 yrs.

ARMSTRONG, Catherine (daughter of Robert and Mary) – died 1871 at age 24 yrs.

ARMSTRONG, Elizabeth P. (daughter of Robert & Mary) – died 1872 at age 17 yrs.

ARMSTRONG, Robert – died 1894 at age 83 yrs.

ARMSTRONG, Mary (wife of Robert) – died 1885 at age 69 yrs.

ARMSTRONG, Robert N. (son of Mary and Robert)- died 1890 at age 29 yrs.

???, Maria – not legible

WHITE, Jane (daughter of George White) – died 1886 at age 26 yrs.

WHITE, George – died 1873 at age 39 yrs.

WHITE, Mary (wife of George) – died 1899 at age 85 yrs.

ABLOW, Mary Jane – died 186?

Wife of William ??? – died 1875 at age 25 yrs.

ABLOW, William – died 1888 at age 77 yrs.

ELLARD, John – died 1859

ELLARD, Thomas – died 1858 at age 15 yrs….or months

Hanton Cemetery

Hanton Cemetery

Concession 9, Lot 14, 565 Kitley Line 8, Unregistered cemetery, east of Frankville on Kitley Line 8 Rd, on private property GPS: 44.742420, -75.926664

hanton-cemetery-b-gibson-fall-2015-10
Hanton Cemetery Fall of 2013
hanton-cemetery-b-gibson-fall-2015-8
Wm. Connor, died May 5, 1887
hanton-cemetery-b-gibson-fall-2015-9
Ellen Connor died April 28, 1887 aged 78 years
hanton-cemetery-b-gibson-fall-2015-2
Fall of 2013
hanton-cemetery-b-gibson-fall-2015-6
Fall of 2013
hanton-cemetery-b-gibson-fall-2015-5
Fall of 2013
hanton-cemetery-b-gibson-fall-2015-3
Fall of 2013
hanton-cemetery-b-gibson-fall-2015-4
William Mulvuagh Sep 20, 1819 – Jun 23 1896
hanton-cemetery-b-gibson-fall-2015-7
William Mulvaugh
hanton-cemetery-b-gibson-fall-2015-1
Sacred to the Memory of Mary Mulvaugh wife of Alonzo Soper, Who departed this life Jun 9th, 1859 age 51 years

 

Inserted a ‘?’ if not legible

Tombstones Names:

 

MULVAUGH, Mary wife of Alonzo Soper

Died Jan. 9, 1859 age 51 yrs.

MULVAUGH, William

Sept. 20, 1819 – June 23, 1896

4 gravestones – not legible
MULVAUGH, Jane wife of ?

187?

1 gravestone – not legible
SOPER, Andrew

Died Oct. 25, 1868 age 36 yrs.

REYNOLDS, Mary Ann wife of Robert E. Bates

Died Apr. 6, 1916 age 79 yrs.

GODRICH, Elizabeth wife of William Godrich

Died Jan. 25, 1856 age 30 yrs.

FERGUSON, William son of James and Anne

?

Eliza Anne ?

Maria E. ?

FERGUSON, Anne & James

?

ARNOLD, Margaret wife of Harold

1873

Francis, son of John

? age 2 days

SMITH, Henry

186?

CONNOR, Robert

Died Feb. 28, 1878 age 72

CONNOR, William Henry

Died Nov. 15, 1859 age 22 yrs.

Grave – not legible
CONNOR, William

Died May 5, 1887 age 90

Ellen, wife of William Connor

Died Apr. 28, 1887 age 78

HANTON, Hannah wife of Richard

Died Feb. 13, 1876 age 54 yrs.

Grave – not legible
HANTON, Jemima J.

Died June 30, 1877

HANTON, Frances wife of Richard

1803

HINTON, Ann

?

HANTON, William

Died Dec. 15, 1896 age 92

Johanna wife of William

Died July 6, 1905 age 87 yrs.`

2 graves – not legible
ALTIMUS, Jemima wife of
George Altimus

Died Apr. 9, 1895 age 86

ALTIMUS, George

Died Nov. 18, 1882 age 84

ALTIMUS, Emma

Died Dec. 17, 1896 age 45 yrs.

ALTIMUS, George

Died Oct. 25, 1900 age 56 yrs.

ALTIMUS, Hannah

1857

Grave – not legible
? Elizabeth
HANTON, Elizabeth
3 Graves – not legible

 

 

 

Greenbush / Smith’s Cemetery

Greenbush / Smith’s Cemetery

Concession 8, Lot 24  Jellyby Road, Location: In a field just east of Greenbush; Cemetery Status: Abandoned (1826-1952) –Twp of Elizabethtown*  GPS- 44.689178, -75.841724

 

greenbush-cemetery-by-b-2
Photo Fall 2015
greenbush-cemetery-by-b-1
Photo Fall of 2015
greenbush-cemetery-by-b-4
Photo Fall 2015
greenbush-cemetery-by-b-3
Photo Fall 2015
greenbush-cemetery-by-b-5
Photo Fall of 2015

Earl Cemetery

Earl Cemetery

Concession 6, Lot 23, New Dublin Road- Interments moved to New Dublin  GPS: 44.667378, -75.801238

Photos taken Fall 2015

picture2
Earl Cemetery Tombstones
picture1
Earl Cemetery Tombstones

picture3 pictures4

 

 

 

 

Brown Cemetery

Brown Cemetery

Concession: 5, Lot: 4/5; Location: Bains Road, south of Manhard Cemetery; Cemetery Status: Closed to further burials – Privately Owned  GPS: 44.670993, -75.711386

browns-cemetery-by-b-gibson-2015-3
Brown Cemetery on a hill photo 2015

 

browns-cemetery-by-b-gibson-2015-2
Brown Cemetery Sign 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

browns-cemetery-by-b-gibson-2015-1
Ruben Brown Sept 25, 1900 – Aug 4, 1992 His beloved Wife Mildred M. Yateman, Jul 18, 1911 – Jan 9, 1985
browns-cemetery-by-b-gibson-2015-4
Robert C. Mulholland, 1932-2011 Beloved Husband of Luella J. Yateman, 1924-

 

 

 

Booth Burying Ground

Booth Burying Ground

Concession: 4, Lot: 32; Location: Seeley’s, on the west side of Perth Road between Kilkenny Road and Howe Road; Cemetery Status: Closed to further burials – Twp of Elizabethtown*, GPS: 44.584538,- 75.805278

 

booth-cemetery-b-gibson-2015-2
Sacred to the Memory of Charles Booth
booth-cemetery-b-gibson-2015-1
Photo taken Fall of 2015
booth-cemetery-b-gibson-2015-3
Photo taken Fall of 2015
booth-cemetery-b-gibson-2015-5
Photo taken Fall of 2015
booth-cemetery-b-gibson-2015-4
Photo taken Fall of 2015
booth-cemetery-b-gibson-2015-6
Photo taken Fall of 2015

 

Bolton Cemetery #1

Bolton Cemetery

Concession 11, Lot 13, west of Twp Road 28– Private Land GPS Not available

bolton-cemetery-1-2
Cemetery located in a field fall of 2015

 

bolton-cemetery-1-5
Brush covering stones- Fall 2015
bolton-cemetery-1-6
Crumbled Stones
bolton-cemetery-1-3
Fallen stone behind fence
bolton-cemetery-1-4
Overgrown cemetery

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brockville & Westport Railway- Right of Way

Here are detailed maps of the old B&W right of way from Westport into Brockville. The maps detail the lots and concessions through which it passed as well as listing information on the date of purchase and from whom the right of way was purchased. There are a series of 24 maps detailing the right of way.

If you want to learn a bit more about the old B&W and discover where the route was located here is your chance.

(We realize that these images are hard to read, if you want to have a better copy email us with the Book Number that you want and we will send you the original image)

 

bw-acover

 

 

 

 

bw-1a
Book 1- Westport
bw-1
Book 1 – Westport

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

bw-2a
Book 2
bw-2
Book 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

bw-3a
Book 3 – Newboro
bw-3
Book 3 – Newboro

 

 

 

 

 

 

bw-4
Book 4
bw-4a
Book 4

 

 

 

 

 

 

bw-5a
Book 5
bw-5
Book 5

 

 

 

 

 

 

bw-6
Book 6
bw-6a
Book 6

 

 

 

 

 

 

bw-7
Book 7
bw-7a
Book 7

 

 

 

 

 

 

bw-8
Book 8
bw-8a
Book 8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

bw-9
Book 9 – Delta
bw-9a
Book 9 – Delta

 

 

 

 

 

 

bw-10
Book 10
bw-10a
Book 10

 

 

 

 

 

 

bw-11
Book 11
bw-11a
Book 11

 

 

 

 

 

bw-12
Book 12
bw-12a
Book 12

 

 

 

 

 

 

bw-13
Book 13 – Athens
bw-13a
Book 13 – Athens

 

 

 

 

 

 

bw-14
Book 14
bw-14a
Book 14

 

 

 

 

 

bw-15
Book 15
bw-15a
Book 15

 

 

 

 

 

bw-16
Book 16
bw-16a
Book 16

 

 

 

 

 

 

bw-17
Book 17
bw-17a
Book 17

 

 

 

 

 

bw-18
Book 18
bw-18a
Book 18

 

 

 

 

 

bw-19
Book 19
bw-19a
Book 19

 

 

 

 

 

bw-20
Book 20 Lyn
bw-20a
Book 20 – Lyn

 

 

 

 

 

bw-21
Book 21 – Lyn
bw-21-pt2
Book 21 – Lyn
bw-21a
Book 21 – Lyn

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

bw-22
Book 22
bw-22a
Book 22

 

 

 

 

 

 

bw-23
Book 23 – Brockville
bw-23a
Book 23 – Brockville

 

 

 

 

 

bw-24
Book 24 – Brockville
bw-24a
Book 24 – Brockville

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kitley- One Room School Houses

One Room School Houses in Kitley

 Blanchard School  (School Section No. 4 or 11)

Concession #1, Lot 26, built 1834

Coad School and Dack’s School  (School Section No. 6)

Concession #4, Lot 17, built early 19th Century

Cornell School  (School Section No. 9)

Concession #5, Lot 22, burned in 1865

Crystal School  (School Section No. 12)

Concession #7, Lot 6, built 1875

Frankville School

The old Frankville school was built in 1875 and served until a new school was built in 1975.

Hutton’s School   (School Section No. 1)

Concession #1, Lot 7, built late 1870’s

Judgeville School  (School Section No. 7)

Concession #4, Lot 26, built prior to1870

Kinch St. School  (School Section No. 8)

Concession #6, Lot 9, built 1840’s

Lake Eloida School  (School Section #17)

Concession #10, Lot 27

Lehigh’s School  (School Section #18)

Concession #9, Lot 22

Mahon’s School  (School Section No. 10)

Located at Bellamys Mills

Mitchell School  (School Section No. 14)

Concession #8, Lot 23, built late 1840’s

Motts Mills School  (School Section No. 3)

Concession #3, Lot 21, built c1833

Newbliss School  (School Section No. 5)

Concession #4, Lot 13, built late 1830’s

Rathwell’s School  (School Section #22)

(Wolford School Section No. 6)

Concession #4, Lot 4

Redan School  (School Section #20)

(Elizabethtown School Section # 26)

Concession 11, Lot 31 in Elizabethtown

Rock Springs School  (School Section # 19)

(Elizabethtown School Section #25)

Concession 10, Lot 22 in Elizabethtown

Shane’s School  (School Section No. 2)

Concession #1, Lot 9, in SouthElmsleyTownship

Soper’s School  (School Section No. 13)

(also known as Otterman’s School)

Concession #9, Lot 12, built 1850

 

Toledo

Toldeo had  3 log schools

Unidentified School

Concession #6 Lot 28, We cannot find a name for this school.

Manhard – A Hamlet in Elizabethtown

Manhard

This is only community in the eastern side of the township, because the only road north from Brockville was the 1-manhardnotorious and deserted “smugglers’ highway’, was Manhard. Manhard is located at the junction of the 5th Concession, at the edge of the Manhard Bog. It was settled by David Manhard, a German, and his many sons.

David Manhard built an imposing Inn in the 1830’s, the only stage coach stop between Brockville and Merrickville. It was two stories on the front, three at the back and a full for storeys at the end. It contained a lot of windows at a time when window glass was heavily taxed.(Elizabethtown: The Last of the Royal Townships by Alvyn Austin pub 2009)

manhards-inn-1830-photo-alvyn-austin
Manhard’s Inn built in 1830 (photo Alvyn Austin)

 

 

 

 

manhard-brothers-1866
Manhard Brothers photo taken in 1866

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Five Manhard Brothers

Sons of William Manhard, photographed on December 15th, 1866 are left to right: Henry 59, William 57, Seaman 53, Niamiah 51 and David 48.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Religion

manhard-church-with-sheds-no-date
Manhard Church with horse sheds. photo not dated

Manhard United Church- the land for this church was purchased from David Manhard in December 1892 by the trustees of the Manhard settlement congregation of Wesleyan Methodists.  The church however opened its’ doors on December 24, 1871, 21 years before the land was officially purchased.

In 1871 Manhard was part of the North Augusta Circuit with Mr. David Manhard as local leader.  In 1884 it became part of the Maitland circuit. In 1904 it again changed becoming part of the Augusta circuit and the name changed to the Algonquin Circuit. The parsonage was changed from Maitland to the corner brick house in Algonquin.

After Union in 1925 this residence was sold and one was purchased in North Augusta to become the United Church Manse. In 1971 the circuit was known as the North Augusta Pastoral Charge.

 

Taken from the Brockville Recorder, Thursday, December 7, 1871:

“Dedication: A new Weysleyan Church has been erected in the Manhard neighbourhood, a few miles from Brockville. The church will be dedicated Sunday the 24th The Chairman of the district, Rev. J. Williams, will preach in the morning and other clergy in the afternoon and evening. Services commence at half past ten, half-past two, and half-past six. A collection will be taken at the close of each service. A tea meeting is also to be held on the 28th when speeches and music will be the order of the day.”

Originally the church had a gallery at the back. The porch was built in the 1930’s and was used as a woodshed and housed two box stoves. When the gallery was removed the stoves were moved inside.

The following information is taken from the booklet “Centennial of Manhard United Church 1871-1971

“The church received its name “Manhard” because of the many Manhards who had settled in the area.

Previous to the building of the church people worshiped in the Manhard School (on the 6th Concession) as early as 1859. This being the only place of worship, the people of Fairfield joined with them walking a distance of 2 ½ miles.

Those were the days of the horse and buggy. Sheds were built to shelter the horses in all kinds of weather. They were constructed to extend in a North-South direction.

The ground floor was used as a dining space. Booths were outside for selling ice cream. Varied programmes of music and humour followed the hot supper of delicious home cooked food.

No porch existed until the early thirties. Originally there was a gallery in the church. The back of the church had two doors at the entrance, There was a large wood box in the porch which fed two huge box stoves inside, thus having no wood inside the church. Electric lights replaced the kerosene lams in 1951 and electric heat replaced the antique wood stoves in 1965.

Young People’s Association

During the ministry of Rev. Lalonde, 1929-1930, a young people’s group was organized. About fifty members met in homes every two weeks for social, literary, devotional and missionary programmes. During the war years the association disbanded as attendance was dwindling due to some of the boys  going into the services and others to projects outside the community.

manhard-sunday-school-picnic-in-houghs-woods-1892
Manhard Sunday School Picnic in Hough Woods 1892
manhard-sunday-school-1971
Manhard Sunday School 1971

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ladies Organization

In the early years a Ladies’ Aid group of dedicated women held meetings and raised money to help finance the work of the church.

After Union in 1930 the Women’s Association was organized in accordance with the Manual of the United Church under the guidance of G.F. Lalonde with Mrs. Charles Edwards as the president and Mrs. Fred Bain as Sectary Treasure.  This organization raised money in various ways such as quilting, socials, chicken suppers, crokinole parties, and penny bag races where members were divided into sides, the losers preparing delicious meals, the winners humorous concerts. Travelling baskets were used where each member contributed an article as well as purchasing one and it went on its way.

In 1962 under the leadership of Ref. James Gibson the W.A. became a new organization known as the ‘United Church Women’. In 1971 with Mrs. Edward Williams as president it continued to raise raise money in various ways for the upkeep of Missions, Manse, Camp for Youth, Summer Schools, etc.

 

 

Manhard’s School (School Section # 13)

Located on the 6th Concession

manhard-school-c1860
Manhard School c1860

from the School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

1850: Stone Building, size 18×24, construction date 1847, condition: Good

1854: Stone building, first opened in 1844

 

 

manhard-methodist-church-july-2016-3
Manhard Church July 2016
manhard-methodist-church-july-2016-2
Manhard Church July 2016
manhard-methodist-church-july-2016-1
Manhard Church interior July 2016

 

manhard-cemetery-july-2016-2
Manhard Cemetery across from the church July 2016
manhard-cemetery-july-2016-1
Manhard Cemetery July 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Addison- A Village in Elizabethtown

Addison (Lewis’ Corners)

addison-1861-62
Addison from a map of 1861-62

The stone home that sits on the south west corner of the intersection at Addison, was built by a Mr. Lewis as a dwelling, but legend says that it was once an inn, a hotel, and later a general store. In the palmy days of the stagecoaches, it was a stagecoach station. Stables at the rear catered to the stage horses and provided shelter for the steeds used by horseback wayfarers, who stopped at the inn.

The house was strategically located at an intersection of country roads. From Brockville, the old Perth trail ran past the front door and veranda. The Greenbush- Addison- Athens road crossed the Perth Road at the intersection. In the pioneer days these were mere dirt roads, rutted in spring and fall, sometimes impassable because of the mud the spring and fall rains created.

Two United Empire Loyalists built most of the old stone houses still standing in this area. They were John Ketchum Jr. and Ira Lewis. Mr. Lewis was a refugee from the American Revolutionary War, who volunteered to fight for the British and Canadian Forces in the War of 1812. For his service to the Crown, Mr. Lewis gained a share of a special $50,000.00 fund set up by the Government of Upper Canada for 1812 veterans.

He married Phoebe, daughter of the founder of Lyn, Abel Coleman and they settled in Addison. Mr. Lewis then built the stone building on the corner in Addison.

Mr. Lewis also built an ashery near the house and ran a flourishing business. At one time he employed eight workers, working day and night producing potash, soda and lye for soap making. He shipped his products to Brockville and from there they were taken overseas for sale in Britain and the European continent.

John Ketchum was a United Empire Loyalist from Connecticut who fled the aftermath of the American Revolutionary War and reached Canada a few years before 1798 but did not reach this area until 1800. Mr. Ketchum built two of the Blanchard stone houses south of Addison.

For the first half of the 19th century, there were a couple of grist mills operating here. In 1873 one of the mills was replaced by a cheese factory, producing Addison cheese for 70 years until it closed in 1942. The factory was then turned into a feed mill and store.

Though a small village, Addison at one time, boasted its own newspaper. Bethuel Loverin, descendant of Greenbush area pioneers, farmed southwest of Addison. He was secretary of the Unionville Agricultural Fair and in addition to farming, he sold farm machinery.

In 1880 Mr. Loverin made a trip to Northern New York State and returned with a small printing press. He set up the machine in a room of his farm dwelling, and began turning out notices for sales and other advertising material. Then he decided to print a newspaper, and the “Addison Reporter” was born.

At first the Addison Reporter was a one page weekly. As he began to gather news, Mr. Loverin expanded the newspaper, but he soon realized that Athens, still known as Farmersville in the 1880’s, was ripe for a newspaper. He moved his operation to Farmersville and the “Athens Reporter” came into existence May 22, 1884.

In its heyday, Addison boasted two hotels, a stagecoach station, post office, two grist mills, a cheese factory, livery stable, shoemaker’s shop, barber shop, lumber business, livestock market, a newspaper, a millinery shop, dry goods store and two grocery stores.

Village Schools

The village’s first school was housed in an unused room of the Taplin Blacksmith Shop. Pioneer Thomas Taplin, who fled from Vermont after the American Revolutionary War, was the first school teacher.

In the 1820’s a log school was erected to replace the one room educational centre in the smithy. This building gave way to a stone school which served Addison for 90 years.

Charles O. Stowell, who married the two daughters of John Ketchum, was born in Massachusetts February 17, 1797. Educated in the United States he came to Canada as a young man with a teaching certificate. In 1832 he took a teaching job at the old Addison school about 200 yards south of the old Perth Trail. This pioneer log school was later torn down and the school moved into the Methodist Church. When the Methodists build a new stone church on the other side of the road, now the Addison United Church, the old house of worship became a permanent school. This school served the community for 90 years until it became unfit for school purposes. It ended its days as a stable on the Scott Farm, where it eventually gave way to decay and collapsed.

A wooden frame school replaced the stone structure and in the late 1960’s it was closed. The Addison School was listed as S.S.no. 21 (for additional photos of the school go to our post on “One Room School Houses in Elizabethtown)

(Recorder & Times c1980, Darling Scrapbook No.3 pages 1-9)

addison-school-turnstyle-photo-2
Addison School notice the boy without shoes
addison-school-2016-2
Addison School House taken in 2016
14329379_10209983402998823_1970106674_o
Addison School, Notice the Turnstile for a gate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cyrenus Stowell

addison-cyrenius-stowell-home-leavitt-history-p144
Cyrenus Stowell Home in Addison, taken from Leavitt History pub 1879

“Oliver O. Stowell was born in Massachusetts, February 19th, 1797. He came to Canada and began teaching at Lewis’ Corners about 47 years ago. At that time Ira Lewis Esq. was keeping a hotel at the Corners. After teaching about four years, Mr. Stowell devoted his attention to farming, settling on Lot No. 36 in the 8th Concession of Elizabethtown. He married Harriet Ketchum, who died in 1843; he subsequently married Abigail, a sister of his first wife. His son Cyrenus Stowell is a successful agriculturist, his farm being a model of neatness and order, in fact second to none in the wealthy Township of Elizabethtown. He has two children, Charles Mason and Edward Norman.”

(History of Leeds and Grenville by Thad. Leavitt pub 1879)

 

Coleman Lewis and the Lewis Family

At an early age, Ira Lewis ran away from home in Connecticut. At the time of his departure, he was a boy without money, and had no settled idea as to his destination. When he set out on his travels, he found a horse shoe, which he sold for 12 ½ ¢. He invested the money in a boys’ lottery and fortunately drew the highest prize of $1.00. With this ‘mine of wealth’, he journeyed to Ogdensburg, N.Y., a distance of 200 miles. After remaining in Ogdensburg a few years he proceeded to Brockville and from there to Lyn, where he opened a shoe shop (having learned the trade in Ogdensburg). While a resident of Lyn, he married Phoebe Coleman. Not being contented with the village, he removed to Brockville, but soon returned again to Lyn where he resided until 1824. During the year 1824 he purchased land at the point where the present village of Addison is located. After moving to that place, he for many years, operated a shoe shop, a farm and inn. During the War of 1812, he entered the British service, and subsequently received a pension for his patriotic conduct.

addison-coleman-lewis-home-leavitt-history-p146
Coleman Lewis Home, taken from Leavitt History pub 1879

“Mr. Lewis’ eldest son, Wellington, married Cordelia Wilson. Coleman married Melinda Taplin; he is one of the most successful merchants in the County of Leeds, having conducted the mercantile business in Phillipsville and Addison, where he resides, carrying on a general store and a large farm. Two of his sons are also engaged in commercial pursuits: Levi S. at Newboro, and Charles H. at Brockville. Mr. Lewis’ residence is an elegant brick structure, a view of which is given in this work. Sarah Lewis married Mr. Adams of Oxford, Ira Jr. married Julia Dwight a grand-daughter of President Dwight of Yale College, Ira being a graduate of that University and a barrister. He practices his profession at Goderich, Ontario. William H. married Angelina Gates; Mary Louisa married Alfred Nelson of the Canadian Land Company, Toronto. We learned from Ira Lewis Sr. that the first house built in Farmersville was a log tavern which was kept by a man named Dickson.”

(History of Leeds and Grenville by Thad. Leavitt pub 1879)

Lewis Corners

addison-1861-62-map
Addison the corners in detail from a map of 1861-62

The original farm belonging to John Ketchum stretched from the present school site north to what is now Highway 29.

Where the road leading to the Ketchum farm intersected the old Perth Road (Hwy 29), the small settlement was known as Lewis Corners. The Lewis family had settled at the crossroads in 1784, built up a hamlet, and opened an inn and hotel, which is now used as a private dwelling.

(Recorder and Times; Darling Collection Book No.3)

 

 

 

 

 

Anglican Church – The land for this church was purchased from Levi Munroe in 1915 for $20.00. The cornerstone was laid in August, 1916 and completed in December of the same year.

“The church was a crenulated castle as a split from the Irish church at Redan, three miles north, which was considered too ‘high church’ because it put a cross on its steeple” (Elizabethtown: The Last of the Royal Townships, by Alvyn Austin pub 2009)

church-2-58-005
Anglican Church c1958
methodist-church-blt-1881-darling-bk-3
Methodist Church Built in 1881
addison-anglican-church-toledo-library-1
Anglican Church
addison-anglican
Interior of Anglican Church

Bethuel Loverin [1]

At one time Addison boasted a newspaper, which was a small sheet of paper, double about the size of a window pane. Bethuel Loverin owned the printing press, which was operated on his farm, situated next to the Stowells. He hired two printers, Lewis and Luther Murphy, twin brothers. Later the press was moved to Farmersville and in the passing of the ‘Addison Reporter’ we find the origins of the ‘Athens Reporter’.

In his early life Mr.Loverin followed farming for a time, and was secretary of the Unionville Fair for many years, travelling about the country as a machine agent, and installing Lodges of the Good Templars throughout the counties of Leeds and Grenville, and in New York State. He had always been greatly interested in printing, and in 1880 he bought a small press and started printing sale bills, fair notices etc. at his farm near Addison.

 

Potash [1]

While some farmers converted the ashes into potash themselves, it was more usual to sell the ashes to a potash factory.

At the Lewis ashery in Addison, “from eight to ten men were employed day and night, manufacturing the collected ashes into potash, soda and lye.”

The Telephone [1]

In 1878, the first telephone exchange in Canada was opened in Hamilton and in 1880, the Bell Telephone Company of Canada was organized. The telephone came soon after to Brockville as it was on the main line from Toronto to Montreal.

Brockville got its first telephone exchange in March, 1881 but only twelve subscribers out of a population of 7,000 were bold enough to have telephones installed.

It is no exaggeration to say that the people of those days were incredulous when they heard of the marvel of the telephone. That they would be able to speak to neighbours and friends who were out of sight and beyond ordinary hearing distance, seemed unbelievable. Indeed early users of the telephone used to shout into the instrument, thinking it would enable the other person to hear better.

When a demonstration of the long distance telephone service was held in Prescott, a farmer participated. He was amazed to hear voices speaking from Brockville, eleven miles away. On his return home he told a neighbour about the ‘miracle’, but the neighbour refused to believe it. “Utterly impossible and a complete fabrication”, he protested.

Addsion Rural Telephone Company, established in 1908, was purchased by Bell in 1964.

[1] Leeds and Grenville, their first two hundred years by Ruth McKenzie

milk-delivery-to-addison-gen-store-darling-bk-3
Milk delivery to Addison General Store
quinns-general-store-addison-darking-bk3-1
Quinns General Store
howe-bros-addison-house-on-east-side-of-road-l-r-levi-carmanharoldfred-digital-email
Howe bros of Addison the house is on the east side of the road LtoR Levi, Carman, Harold and Fred
howe-family-addison-on-east-side-of-road-didital-email
Howe Family Gathering on their front porch
florida-house-hotel-addison-darling-bk3-1
Florida House Hotel, Addison
calamity-janes-addison-darling-bk3-2
Calamity Janes in Addison
flemming-house-hwy-29n-addison-toledo-library-3
Flemming House Hwy 29 Addison
addison-ira-lewis-hotel-c1830-photo-alvyn-austin
Ira Lewis Hotel operated in 1830 (Photo Alvyn Austin)
addison-didigital-by-email
Welcome to Addison, woman unknown
addison-orange-lodge-photo-alvyn-austin
Orange Lodge Building (Photo Alvyn Austin)
addison-church-toledo-library-1
Methodist Church, Addison
rev-r-h-whiteside-pastor-addison-utd-church-1933-35-daring-bk3
Rev. R.H. Whiteside pastor Addison United Church 1933-35

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

pattersons-hardware-at-addison-1
Patterson’s Hardware Store at Addison c1975

 

 

 

 

addison-savings-bank-1892
Addison Savings Bank Advertisement in “The Athens Reporter” 1892
addison-h-b-brown-agent
Advertisement from The Athen’s Reporter c1889

 

“Edna’s Scrapbook”

is a paperback book written by Edna B. Chant and was published in 1998. Edna Chant was a reported with the “Athens Reporter” for 23 years and she is the author of four books.

Her book, which is made up of news clippings from various sources, from which we have taken excerpts, gives us a glimpse into life in our area for over a hundred year period ending with stories from 1975.

While her book covers many areas of Leeds and Grenville we have only focused on the area within Elizabethtown-Kitley Township.

Her book, which is made up of news clippings from various sources, from which we have taken excerpts, gives us a glimpse into life in our area for over a hundred year period ending with stories from 1975.

While her book covers many areas of Leeds and Grenville we have only focused on the area within Elizabethtown-Kitley Township.

 

Addison

On August 3, 1890, two Addison men had a horse race to settle a bet and after the race, the winning horse seemed to be breathing heavily. It was decided to let off a little blood to relieve tension, but they could not get the bleeding stopped and the horse bled to death.

The barns and sheds of Horace Booth near Addison were burned on July 15, 1891 of unknown causes. No insurance was carried.

Two young men from Addison had reason to visit some lady friends at Forthton on January 22, 1895 and they tied their horse and cutter in John Forth’s shed. When they started home, they noticed that the horse was having great difficulty in travelling and pulling the cutter. When they got out to investigate they saw they had been making a track like a steamboat, and they found they had one of Mr.Forth’s pig troughs firmly wedged between the runners. It was all they could do to dislodge it, but finally were on their way home, the horse travelling on wings of light.

On April 26, 1895 an Addison man Chancey Botsford, was fatally injured when he fell from the platform of a moving train and had his right leg and his left foot cut off. He only lived a few minutes.

For some weeks a demented woman has been haunting Addison area and Redan. She stays in the swamp but comes out to farmhouses for food. One farmer caught her milking his cow, and she told him she was on her way to Ottawa. It is not know who she is or where she came from. On May 15, 1898, a group of men banned together to try to catch her, and take her to the insane asylum for treatment and care, but she ran deep into the swamp and eluded them.

The home of Philander Brown at Addison was burned on April 18, 1898 Neighbours were able to carry out most of the furniture.

An aged Addison man had no home, and had been going from farm to farm begging. A group of men got together and built him a small shack. But that didn’t solve the food problem On Nov 20th a meeting was called to discuss the problem. One farmer agreed to give him room and board for the winter for $40. A canvass was made of the village and $16. was collected. One farmer gave the huge sum of ten cents. It is hoped the remaining $24. can be collected.

A tramp was found in a barn at Addison on December 19, 1900. He was in a very sad condition. Both feet were frozen solid and he was taken to hospital where one foot had to be amputated, and all toes were removed from the other foot. He told police his name was Ryan and he gave his address as Montreal.

The beautiful home of Edward Duffield ¾ of a mile north of Addison was burned on January 20, 1907. It was a large frame house and one of the finest in the country and formerly occupied by Cyrenus Stowell of Brockville. Neighbours were able to carry out some of the furniture.

On March 28, 1908 fire destroyed the home of Frank Wiltse at Addison. Nothing was saved except for a few chairs. Overheated stove pipes were the cause.

James W. Brown of Addison age 79 years, died on February 13, 1920. He was going to his barn and slipped on ice and fell injuring his hip and was unable to rise. He was found four hours later by his son Malcome of Athens. Death was due to pneumonia. Ten children survive.

An Addison woman had an odd accident. She was hanging out cloths and took hold of the wire clothesline, and then found she could not let go. Her family and several neighbours offered advice but nothing helped. The line was then cut on each side of her hand which was then soaked in hot water. After several minutes her fingers opened.

The barns of W.H. Murphy of Addison were burned on July 20, 1917 after being struck by lightning. Volunteers were able to save the house, but one side was badly scorched.

Joseph Greenham 57 of Addison was drowned in a water tank May 3, 1921

Derk Vandermear, 7, was killed by a car near Addison on June 28, 1951

The barns of Asa Peterson at Addison were destroyed by fire June 27, 1953

On February 22, 1956 Nancy Ann Moore, 19, of Lyn District and Gerald Walker of Addison district were found dead in a car.

The home of Stanley Madigan of Addison was burned on June 8, 1958

On February 14, 1963 the home of Mr. and Mrs. William Djkes of Addison area was burned. The couple were visiting neighbours for the evening and when they returned home at 10:45 pm they saw a light in the window. When they opened the door they were met by flames. Mrs. Djkes ran back to the neighbours to call the fire department, but couldn’t get through. Mr. Djkes and his neighbour, Mr. Gringhuis tried to fight the fire with snow, but the flames gained the upper hand. They got all the cattle out of the nearby barn and by using snow were able to save it.

At the end of 1964, one of the few remaining telephone companies in eastern Ontario went out of existence when the Addison Rural Independent Telephone Co. was purchased by the Bell Telephone Company.

Theodore Martin Vanasseldonk, 16, of RR 1 Addison was fatally wounded in a hunting accident on the family farm.

Mrs. Anna Merkx, 62, of Addison was killed on 401 Highway.

 

Grant’s Creek

Crossing Grant’s Creek

The creek takes its name from the original settlers of the area the Grant Family. We are fortunate to have old post cards, prints and photos showing how the original bridge looked. Today as you drive along the highway, you can cross the creek without really even knowing it’s there.

 

grants-creek-wb6-1
The mouth of Grants Creek as it flows into the St. Lawrence River c1900
grants-creek-1907-post-card
Grant’s Creek Bridge from an old postcard c1900
grants-creek-wb6-3
Grant’s Creek Bridge looking south
grants-creek-wb6-2
Grant’s Creek Looking towards the St. Lawrence River c1900

Brockville Cemeteries

The Brockville Cemeteries

The cemetery comprises 14 acres of land on either side of the highway. It has been owned and operated by the City of Brockville since 1860, when all the older in-town cemeteries were closed and the graves moved into this area.

The land was purchased from the Grant Family. The land south of the highway had been granted by the Crow to Sgt. Allen Grant in 1789. This land was divided into three sections for use by the Anglicans, Roman Catholics and other Protestant denominations.

In 1890 an additional 46 acres were purchased on the north side of the highway and the area was named Oakland Cemetery.

For additional photos of these cemeteries, look on our website for Cemeteries in Elizabethtown.

 

oakland-cemetery-pab7f19a3
Wood & Buchanon Undertakers, c1890
oakland-cemetery-pab7f19a2
Oakland Cemetery c1890
oakland-cemetery-pab7f19a1a
Oakland Cemetery c1890

 

bkv-cemetery-br-may-16-1859-for-website

 

From the Brockville Recorder

May 16, 1850 On purchasing land for a new cemetery

 

At a meeting of the town council held on Monday evening previous, tenders were received for land for a public cemetery for Brockville. There were three offers, viz.: A lot of 20 acres belonging to R.Bell, at £15 per acre, one of 15 acres belonging to Mrs. Jas. Dack, at £7 10s an acre, and a lot of 12 acres belonging to Allan Grant, at £13 per acre. It was agreed that the committee should examine the ground and when satisfied as to the most eligible site, call a public meeting of the inhabitants of the town to decide whether the corporation should purchase the ground, or be obliged to private parties for the liberty of interment, or “when this liberty cannot be obtained, that they be compelled to pitch the dead into any hole or ditch that may be most convenient to their dwellings.” Messrs. Rankin and Crawford were the only two members of the council opposed to the purchase of ground from the funds of the corporation.

 

 

 

 

 

Brockville Cemetery Memorial Works

The Brockville Cemetery Memorial Works

Just past the Lyn road on the south side of the highway you would come to this next business.

Lancelot de Carle was the founder of the business now known as Brockville Cemetery Memorial Works.

Lancelot de Carle was first in business in Prescott on that town’s King Street one door west of Norton Miller’s bookstore. De Carle advertised gravestones, monuments etc. in marble, granite or sandstone.

His first local plant was set up in 1861 at No.8 Railroad Street, Brockville north to the railway tracks and it is presumed that the marble works were located on the west of the street near its junction with King Street. The street began life with the name Buell Street, but for some years was known as “Railroad St.” n it reverted back to Buell and has been known by that name ever since.

In the 1866 Fuller’s Directory of Brockville, Lancelot’s business was identified as “Central Canada Marble and Stone Works”

In 1875 the de Carle works passed into the hands of Lancelot’s son Leopold. The plant moved in 1869 from Railroad Street to a point on the south side of old No.2 Highway near the Brockville Cemetery.

Leopold called his factory “Brockville Cemetery Marble Works”. The family chose the site in order to be close to the burying grounds However, de Carle stones blossomed in cemeteries throughout the United Counties.

Their two story headquarters was equipped with pneumatic drills for engraving and used the most modern machinery of the times as well as employing highly skilled mechanics.

Leopold de Carle himself was an expert craftsman as well as an astute businessman and a pillar of the community. His literature proclaimed “Always on hand a large stock of finished work fro which to select in marble and granite. I import direct from the famous granite quarries in Scotland and Sweden and also from various quarries in Canada and the United States. Superior Designs and lowest estimate supplied on application”

John Johnston, who lived on the Lyn Road not far from the marble works was employed as one of the stone masons carving and chiselling the various headstones.

Fred W.Grant took over the business in 1939. He joined the firm at 18 in 1927 and retired in 1974. Fred died on January 14, 1983.

The business was sold to George and Peter Rigos of Kingston.

(excerpts from the R&T- Darling Scrapbook No. 1 pg 135)

decarle-cemetery-works-wb6-6-medium
Marble Works c1900

 

l-decarle-stone-works-1866-fuller-ab26
Advertisement from Fuller’s Directory 1866

 

decarle-cemetery-works-c1890-4
LeCarle Marble Works Notice that is was right on the road
decarle-cemetery-works-wb6-3
LeCarle Marble Works
decarle-cemetery-works-c1890-2
LeCarle Marble Works

 

or-leroy-marble-dealer-1866-fuller-ab26
Advertisement from Fuller’s Directory of 1866
decarle-cemetery-works-wb6-1-medium
John Johnston is the tall man in the centre of this photo c1890

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

decarle-cemetery-works-wb6-5-medium
Taken in the winter, notice the narrowness of the road and the closeness of the old building to the cemetery c1890

 

 

bkv-cemetery-memorial-works-f-w-grant-1961x
F.W.Grant c1961
bkv-cemetery-memorial-works-1-61-505
F.W.Grant Memorial Works c1961
bkv-cemetery-memorial-works-1961-2
F.W.Grant Memorial Works c1961

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nedow’s Garage

Nedow’s Garage

If on you trip along the highway your car had problems, you could always pull into Nedow’s Garage on the corner of the Lyn Road and Hwy No. 2. Bill Nedow was the owner and operator of this establishment. He operated a car junk yard and if you were ever looking for a part, you could usually count on Bill to find it for you.

As well as the garage, Bill Nedow also acted as the Willys Jeep Dealer for this area for many years.

nedows-garage-lyn-rd-1960-1
Bill Nedow standing next to the Jeep c1960
accident-hearse-2-64-226
Nedow’s Garage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

nedows-garage-lyn-rd-1960-2
Willys Jeep Sales