The Lyn Cemetery Recording

by George A.Neville

(as it appeared in the booklet “Families” vol.22, no. 4, 1983, November)

NOTE: Grave Location Maps at the very end of this post

NOTE: Alphabetical Listing of Names is in the middle section of this post

The Lyn cemetery was recorded during three major visitations on the 6th, 11th and 16th of November 1975, largely through the efforts of Ibra L. Conners, the author (George A. Neville) and his wife, Iris Neville of Ottawa together with generous assistance by Elizabeth Stuart of Osgoode and Elizabeth M. Gordon, Marjory Phillips and Mary L. Boyd of Ottawa. In total more than 110 man hours were required for recording tombstones, double checking the inscriptions and in preparing a recording map showing the relative locations of the stones in the cemetery. Unfortunately, the pressure of editorial work and other engagements prevented final preparation of the recording until September 1982 when a final visitation was made to clarify some of the questions which had arisen during preliminary typing of the inscriptions. At this time some additional tombstone data were added in cases know to the author of demises during the preparatory interval; however it was not possible to make a complete re-check of the cemetery, the recording of memorials must be dated effectively from November of 1975.

During the September visitation following the seven year interim, it was noted that several of the abandoned tombstones (A series) had been grouped together and laid flat into the lawn along the north fence a few paces east of the main gate. This arrangement is shown opposite, the particular stones being (fore to aft) A3, A4, A6, A8, A17, A18, A21, A22 and A27. In addition, three stones, 413, 414 and 416, previously located elsewhere in the cemetery in 1975 as shown on the map, were now found at the eastern (aft) edge of this embedded grouping. Likewise the grouping happily contains two new tombstones, A30 and A31 (re the latter, see also 144) previously not seen but presumably resurrected during cemetery maintenance. A third, newly found tombstone, A29, may be seen laid into the lawn near the north fence a few paces west of the main gate. During November, 1982, much of the wild brush growth and a few dead trees between the northern fence and the limestone outcropping were cut out exposing numerous broken remnants of old abandoned tombstones which, in due course will probably be added tot he memorial arrangements.

Using the Cemetery Recording

The numerical sequence of the cemetery recording is purely arbitrary. Numbers were assigned to each memorial (also to bases of missing memorials to indicate the existence if plots) starting at the north side with the most westerly row (the newest section) south of the gate below the Anglican Church. Numbering was continued south to the end row; then it was continued northward along the second row. In this way numbering advanced eastward while working rows alternately south and north as indicated by the attached recording map. Sometimes during checking of the recordings, a missed tombstone would be found. Such previously missed stones are identified by the letters A or B following the number of the most proximate stone, e.g. tombstone 479A located near stone 479 was missed on the first round. In addition, a series of tombstones and fragments were found along the north fence in November, 1974 after frost had denuded and reduced much of the vegetation. These stones, indicated by the prefix A, are appended as a separate group at the end of the principal recording. Names from all recorded tombstones have been indexed alphabetically for convenience of reference to transcribed memorials, the number following each name indicating the particular store bearing the memorial or group of memorials. Double entries have been made in the case of names of females:

1) a given name followed by a capitalized surname indicates the married name of the woman, e.g. Eleanor CLOW (470) (seen under Aird) signifies that Eleanor Aird was married as Eleanor Clow

2) a given name following a surname in lower case indicates the woman’s name before marriage, e.g. Georgina May (Pettem) (49) seen under ANDERSON signifies that the former Georgina May Pettem was married to an Anderson. The relationships were all derived from the inscribed information, and this system of surname presentation is simply given to maximize cross-reference and name retrieval.

Whenever possible, affiliation of the deceased with a lodge or lodges, as judged by the presence of lodge markers near the tombstones, has been indicated within parenthesis in the tombstone inscriptions as follows: (I.O.O.F.) Independent Order of Oddfellows; (Masonic) Masons of Canada; (A.O.U.W.) Ancient Order of United Workmen; (R. Of R.) Daughters of Rebecca; (Eastern Star) Order of Eastern Star.

Acknowledgement

The Author is indebted to the late Walter Jarvis, Gerald Coon and to Alan Hanna for information bearing on cemetery organization and operation.

Alphabetical Order

Map of Grave Locations

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