For Photos, Maps etc. look under the school name on our website

Addison School

 (School Section No. 21)

There have been four schools in Addison. The first was built of logs and burned. Both the second and third schools[1] in Addison doubled as Episcopal and Methodist Churches. The second school was a stone building which stood beside the third, framed school. This school was moved to Benjamin Scott’s property and used as a horse stable. It was torn down in the early 1950’s. The third school is a frame building which was constructed in the early 1870’s. It continued to be the Addison School until the 1960’s. The building is now privately owned.

In the 1820’s a log school was erected to replace the one room educational centre in the smithy. This building gave way to a stone school which served Addison for 90 years.

 

Charles O.Stowell, who married the two daughters of John Ketchum, was born in Massechusetts February 17, 1797. Educated in the United States he came to Canada as a young man with a teaching certificate. In 1832 he took a teaching job at the old Addison school about 200 yards south of the old Perth Trail. This pioneer log school was later torn down and the school moved into the Methodist Church. When the Methodists build a new stone church on the other side of the road, now the Addison United Church, the old house of worship became a permanent school. This school served the community for 90 years until it became unfit for school purposes. It ended its days as a stable on the Scott Farm, where it eventually gave way to decay and collapsed.

 

A wooden frame school replaced the stone structure and in the late 1960’s it was closed. The Addison School was listed as S.S.no. 21

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Log building, 20×26 in size, constructed in 1850, condition: Good

1854: Stone building first opened in 1832

 

 

Bell’s School (School Section #24)

Wolford Twp (School Section #16)

 

Bell’s School was a shared school between Elizabethtown and Wolford Township. It was located on the Rocksprings Road and to the immediate east of the schoolhouse is the Bell’s Cemetery. There used to be a stone church in one corner of the emery, but all that remains now are a few foundation stones.

 

“The school was built on land donated by James Bell who settled there with his family on or before the year 1831. The land for the school was purchased from S. Harper for £30 it was lot 13” (Recorder and Times article)

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: no report

1854: Log building, first opened in 1838

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

To the Local Superintendent of schools for the Township of Elizabethtown. Pay to Mary B.Smith as ordered out of the school fund apportioned to School Section No. 24 in the Township of Elizabethtown the sum apportioned to said section (Signed and Sealed) Walter Bell and Richard Richards, Trustees-1871

 

 

 

Bolton School

(School Section # 23)

 

The old Bolton School once stool on the property of Henry White. The school once stood near the Bolton Cemetery on Lot 5 of the Tenth Concession in Elizabethtown.  There were several Berry Families located near the school, and their children made up the larger part of the student body.

 

The Bolton School was located in the hamlet of Shiloh.

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: no report

1854: Log building, first opened in 1842

 

 

 

 

Fairfield East School

(School Section #8)

 

The first school was a log cabin built on the west corner of the farm owned by McDougall’s. Johnathan Barr was the teacher and was noted for his stern and strict qualities. When the community became more settled it was found that the school was not central nor adequate enough so a second school was built about a mile and half farther west. This one also passed into history with the erection of a third, which was built a few rods [sic] east again and which is most up to date.[2]

 

About 1865 a wooden frame school was built west of the McDougall farm and around 1900 the third Fairfield East School was erected. The school was phased out during the school consolidation of the 1960’s. (R&T Darling Collection Bk3)

 

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Frame Building, size 20×24, no construction date, condition Good

1854: Log building, first opened in 1808

 

 

 

Glen Buell School

(School Section # 16)

 

“Peter Booth’ School 1842

Dr. John G.Booth’s eldest son was Peter Booth, born at the farm in 1825. In 1842 at the age of 17, he started teaching at the log school in Glen Buell. He had 63 children, ranging in age from 4 to 17, and received the magnificent salary of 2.5 pounds per month. Peter Booth died in 1860, of tuberculosis, leaving a wife and three young children. In 1842, and enthusiastic young buck, he wrote his first report to the district council:

I beg leave to submit the enclosed report of the Common School at present under my instruction. The school house in which this school is taught is on the rear of Lot 31, in the 6th Concession of Elizabethtown on the Main Road leading from Brockville to Farmersville.

All the pupils that have attended resided within two miles of the school house and there are probably from 16 to 20 children more living within that distance from the schoolhouse between the ages of 5 and 16 whose names are not on this report as they have not been in attendance. The school was commenced about the first pf April last, Teachers wages two pounds five shillings per month with the expectation that further aid would be granted from the public monies.” (from Lea Booth, John Booth, p54-55) [3]

 

The original school was a small log schoolhouse constructed by Eri Hayes in the 1820’s.

 

The school was closed in the spring of 1965 and pupils bused to either Addison or New Dublin depending on where they lived. Because of overcrowding at New Dublin a few years later, Glen Buell was re-opened for Grade 1 students for a short time.

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Log Building, size 24×24, construction date 1837, condition Good

1854: Frame building, first opened in 1844

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

That the request of the trustees of School Section No 16 be complied with that the sum of one hundred dollars be levied and collected on the rateable property of said section exclusive of expenses-1869
that the Trustees of School Section No 16 be paid the sum of $1 as non-collected school tax an that Lot 34 in the Seventh Concession of Elizabethtown and the Clerk order the sum to be paid to Boyd Hall-1870[4]

 

 

 

 

 

Greenbush School

(School Section No. 20)

 

The first school in Greenbush was built of logs in 1835 on land donated by James Haskin. It burned in 1845 after only ten years of use. The second school, made of stone, was constructed on the same site in 1848. It was twice as large as the first. However it was torn down in 1918 in order to build a larger school. Construction of the brick building was completed within six months, In 1905 the school grounds were enlarged, trees were planted and a fence erected. The land for the extension was purchased from Thomas Webster.

 

While construction was underway in 1918 classes were held in the United Church Hall. Between 1845 and 1848 classes were held above the store at Millhouse and in one of William Olds’ houses.

 

The first teacher on record is Miss. Sarah Taggart in 1840. She was followed by Miss. Lucinda Keller who received $5. per month.

 

The school was phased out of the school system in 1965. [5]

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Log Building, size 26×24, construction date 1830, condition Good

1854: Brick building, first opened in 1849

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

That Edward Davis be detached from school section no 18 and be attached to school section no 20-1858[6]

 

 

 

Halleck’s School

(School Section #5)

 

On June 28, 1963 the school rang its’ bell for the last time. The teacher at the time was Mrs.Marion Ross, and she was the last person to teach at the little brick school house located on the Halleck’s Road. The 27 remaining pupils from this school are being transferred to the Lyn Public School. About 10 years prior there were 34 pupils in the school

 

The original school was a log school house located in the north corner of the Halleck’s Road and No. 2 Highway. Rev. William Hallock built a school before 1810 which had a ready made class, what with 16 Coles, 13 Clows, 10 or 12 Fulfords and his own six children. The school was replaced by the present building in 1935, a trim neo-classical brick Edifice.[7] The brick school house was built further north on the Halleck’s Road around 1839. The land on which the present school was built was donated by Mr. Caleb Halloch (Squire Halloch) on May 12, 1838 and was built by Archibald Davidson a stone mason. A well was drilled for the new school in the 1930’s and toilets were installed around 1939. In the early 1940’s electricity was installed. Between 1886 and 1900 teachers salaries were from $220. to $300 per year.

 

Heritage Elizabethtown erected a plaque near the original school recalling an incident that took place during the War of 1812. The plaque reads as follows:

 

Hallock’s School and the ‘Underhill Incident’

 

“A one room school near here was the site of an international incident before the war of 1812. William Hallock (1770-1836), a Methodist preacher, established the school in a log cabin on his property. In 1809 the teacher was Isaac Underhill, an alleged American army deserter. On May 1, three American soldiers disembarked from a schooner on the St. Lawrence, seized Underhill at the school and dragged him, bound and gagged towards the river. When Underhill broke free and ran, his captors shot him from behind. They then fled to their boat with armed settlers in pursuit. Underhill died the next day. His murder was a flagrant violation of British sovereignty which outraged Canadians and lingered long on local memory” (Issac Underhill is said to be buried in an unmarked grave in the Fulford Cemetery)

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Frame Building, size 24×34, construction date 1811, condition: Not Good

1854: Frame building, first opened in 1817 (this report combines SS #3 and 5)

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1872

 

That the union of School sections no 3 & 5 be dissolved and that all resolutions uniting the same be rendered the same as if said divisions ere never united at the request of a public meeting held for that purpose signed by Henry Clow, Chairman- 1858
that the Clerk be instructed to prepare a Bylaw to unite School Sections No.3 and No.5 into one section agreeable to the request of the rate payers of said sections- 1869
that the application of the Trustees of School Section No 5 be complied with and the sum of $200 be levied and collected on the Taxable property of said section exclusive of expenses -1872[8]

 

 

Hawke’s School

Sectional School No. 27

(Rear of Young SS # 11)

 

 

There was a school in Glossville called “Hawke’s School. The school was so named because there were two group of Hawke’s children who attended the school in its early years. One Hawke farm was located north of the school the other farm to the south of the school. The school was sandwiched between the two farm families and filled with Hawke children. It was here that Glossville children were educated. The community sent its children to the old brick school long after people stopped using the name Glossville. After Hawke’s closed the children were bussed to Frankville or to Addison. Land for the school was donated to the area school board in 1857 by John Hawke, and it is probable that the stone building was erected within the following three years. Hawke’s School closed in 1962. The school was located at the junction of Hwy 29 and the Lake Eloida Road.

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: no report

1854: first opened in 1830

 

 

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

that $36 dollars of Clergy money be divided amongst the School Sections of this Township in the following manner, namely Sections No 1 $10, No 12 $5, No 26 $9, No 27 $9.31 cents, No 28 $5, No 29 $2, No 30 $5, No 31 $6 bring union section all the full Sections will leave the sum of $13.11 cents each and the Clerk ? the sum to be paid to the Trustees of each School Section- 1873[9]

 

 

 

Howard School

(School Section #6)

 

On the 12th Day of October 1861, a parcel of land was purchased on which to build the Howard School.  The indenture was between Andrew Donaldson and his wife Eliza and the School Section number 6 in the township of Elizabethtown, for a sum of sixty dollars. The parcel of land was described on the indenture as a part of the rear of the east half of Lot number twenty three in the Second Concession in the Township of Elizabethtown. In 1946 a well and pump were installed.[10]

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: no information except: condition: Not Good

1854: Frame building, first opened in 1850

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jellby

(School Section # 22)

 

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: No Report

1854: Stone building, first opened in 1826

 

 

 

 

Lillie’s School

(S.S. No. 12 Elizabethtown)

(S.S.No. 9 Front of Yonge)

 

Lillie’s School was located at Lillie’s about five miles from Lyn on the Graham Lake Road. The original school was built of wood and located on the west corner of Hendry Road a quarter of a mile west of the new school. The wooden structure blew down in a wind storm. It was replaced by one made of brick in 1880. This school was 40 feet long by 30 feet wide and could accommodate 35 students. The new brick school was used up until school consolidation in the 1960’s. The school was closed in June 1963, and was demolished in 1988.[11]

 

The school also served as a church and services were held there every two weeks on a Monday evening by Methodists Ministers from Lyn. One the first graduates of Lillie’s School was John Booth who became a provincial land surveyor and helped to survey the counties of Leeds and Grenville.

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Stone Building, size 26×36, construction date 1845, condition: Poor

1854: Stone building, first opened in 1842

 

 

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1872

 

That $36 dollars of Clergy money be divided amongst the School Sections of this Township in the following manner, namely Sections No 1 $10, No 12 $5, No 26 $9, No 27 $9.31 cents, No 28 $5, No 29 $2, No 30 $5, No 31 $6 bring union section all the full Sections will leave the sum of $13.11 cents each and the Clerk ? the sum to be paid to the Trustees of each School Section – 1873[12]

 

 

Lyn School

(School Section #7)

 

The first school house was located in the centre of the village by the creek. It was abandoned for a newer one room brick school at the west end of the Village, across from the present building. It was in use until 1867 when it burned down. The growth of the village led to a new two story, four room stone school house being built across from the one room brick structure.

 

The stone schoolhouse in Lyn was built in 1867 and served the children of the district until 1959/1960.  “The classrooms were on the ground floor and the second floor boasted a small stage so that concerts and plays could take place. Parties and dances were held there too”[13]

 

The Public School in Lyn was built in the year 1867. Although the first annual meeting of the school, on record, took place in 1876 there was undoubtedly meetings before that, as an entry in the old minute and account book shows that John Halliday was the Sect-Treasurer in 1871.  The first annual meeting of School Section No 7 was held in the school hall Wed, Jan 12, 1876 at 10 o’clock. Mr. Norman Coleman was appointed chairman and R.S.Hudson Sect. The school has to date had 60 teachers. The first school fair was held about 1914 on the old “Tan Bark Flats” with entries of cooking, vegetables, fancy work and collections of butterflies and insects. (Suzanne Coke, 1944) [14]

 

The “New” Lyn School opened its doors to 185 pupils on September 4, 1956. It was planned by architect Mr.Prus and built by contractor Mr.J.Saunders of Prescott for the cost of $92,000.  Miss. Anna Hudson was the prince[al of this new school. As the enrolment of the school increased with the closing of the Howard and Halleck’s School, it was found necessary to add four more room sto the original six room building. The addition was completed and ready for use in September 1963. The enrolment then was 263 pupils. Still the number increased and by 1965 all those pupils residing on the Howard Road were transferred to the Tincap School. In June 1965 the enrolment was 295. On June 29th, 1967 Miss Anna Hudson retired as Principal , Mr.J.Tallmire of Brockville became the new principal. (Anna Hudson, 1967) [15]

 

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: no report only: condition: Good

1854: Brick building, first opened in 1850

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1872

 

that the trustees of Lyn School Section No 7 be paid the amount due said section on account of debentures and the clerk order the same to be paid- 1871[16]

 

 

 

 

Manhards School

(School Section # 13)

 

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Stone Building, size 18×24, construction date 1847, condition: Good

1854: Stone building, first opened in 1844

 

 

 

 

Marshall School

(School Section No. 17- Elizabethtown)

(SS # 3 – Augusta)

Alt name Gosford School

 

The first children of the area of Linden Bank went to school in a crude log building, but in 1869 the farmers of the area constructed what became to be known as Marshall School.

 

The school was built out of stone on a low knoll on Gosford Road probably 100 yards off the North Augusta Road.  After serving generations pf Linden Bank children the school was phased out by the school consolidation of the 1960’s.

 

The school itself was built on land donated by the Marshall Family. Several families of Marshalls lived in the area, running their farms and contributing to community life. The school had rough wooden benches and desks. It had only one room, in which all the grades were taught. It was designated as Elizabethtown SS No. 17. A plague over the doorway gave the date of construction as 1869.

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Stone Building, size 32×26, construction date 1848, condition: Good

1854: log building, first opened in 1844

 

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

That the request of the trustees of School Section No 17 be complied with that the sum of three hundred and fifty dollars be levied and collected on the rateable property of said section exclusive of expenses-1869
that the Reeve be and is hereby authorised to notify according to law that portion of the Township formerly composed of Union School Section No 29, also School Section No 17 that the council intend to pass a Bylaw to attach the first named portion of the Township to School Section No 17 at the next sitting of the Council on the 4th of Oct next- 1871
that the Trustees of School Section No 17 be paid the sum of $200 dollars being part of the assessment on said Section for school purposes and the Clerk order the same to be paid-1873[17]

 

 

 

Maud’s School

(School Section No. 18)

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Stone Building, size 28×38, construction date 1830, condition: Good

1854: Log building, first opened in 1819

 

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

That Edward Davis be detached from school section no 18 and be attached to school section no 20-1858
That the request of the trustees of School Section No 18 be accepted and that the sum of $60. be levied and collected on the rateable property of said section for school purposes-1862
that the petition of the trustees of School Section No 18 be complied with and the sum of Thirty dollars be levied and collected on the assessed rateable property of said section free of all expenses for school purposes and paid to the trustees of said section- 1867
That the request of the trustees of School Section No 18 be complied with that the sum of sixty five dollars be levied and collected on the rateable property of said section exclusive of expenses-1869
that the application of the Trustees of School section No 18 be complied with and the sum of Eighty dollars be levied and collected on the rateable property of said section exclusive of expenses-1871
that the application of School Trustees Section No 18 be complied with and the sum of $100 dollars be levied and collected on the Taxable property of said section exclusive of expenses-1872[18]

 

 

Meads

Sectional School No. 14

 

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Frame Building, construction date 1826, condition: Good

1854: Stone building, first opened in 1820

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

that the sum of three dollars and fifty cents be paid to trustees of School Section No 14 of Elizabethtown as uncollectible and the clerk order the same to be paid Benjamin Frances 1873[19]

 

Moores School

(School Section #21)

 

We have no additional information about this school. If anyone has any information or photos, we would appreciate hearing from you.

 

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Log building, 20×26 in size, constructed in 1850, condition: Good

1854: Stone building first opened in 1832

 

 

 

New Dublin School

(School Section #15)

 

The first school was built near Lamb’s Pond, almost across the road from the Ernest Kendrick farm, later owned by Donald Stewart. Later a school was built on the Horton Farm near the present school. No dates are know for the erection of either of these buildings. The second school was torn down and while the third school was being built pupils attended classes in the first Orange Hall, a frame building between the present school and the Methodist Church. The third New Dublin School was built in 1880.

 

Annie Scott who taught in 1894 received $310. per year. [20]

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Log building, 20×24 in size, constructed in 1837, condition: Good

1854: Stone building first opened in 1813

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1872

 

That the sum of 21.50 pounds clear of all expenses be levied and collected on the rateable property of school section No 15.- 1862
that the application of the Trustees of School Section No 15 be complied with and the sum of $30 be levied and collected on the assessed taxable property of said School Section for School Purposes exclusive of expenses for the year 1869
that the application of the Trustees of School section No 15 be complied with and the sum of $115 be levied and collected on the assessed taxable property of said section exclusive of expenses for school purposes- 1871
that the application of the Trustees of School Section No 15 be complied with and the sum of $155 be levied and collected on the assessed taxable property of said Section exclusive of all expenses for the year 1872

 

 

 

Purvis Street School

(School Section # 8 Front of Yonge)

 

The first school was a stone structure built in 1844. The children sat on wooden benches and in the winter these benches were placed around a box stove to keep the pupils warm. On May 12, 1890 the local ratepayer held a meeting and voted to build a new school. The school closed in June 29, 1967. The school was located west of Lyn.

 

The pupils who attended this school will attend Caintown School until the new modern 12 room school is ready in Mallorytown. The present brick structure was built to replace a stone building which had been erected in 1844. On May 12, 1890 the ratepayers held a meeting and voted 11 to 9 in favour of building a new school. On June 16, 1890 the following resolution was passed “ The tender of George Aaron Purvis of Purvis Street to build a school similar to the one recently built near the Toll Gate on the Perth Road, at the rear of Brockville for the sum of $675.00 and use of the old material from the other school was accepted” The school referred to in this resolution nwas the Brick School on the Chemical Road. A plate bearing the date of the old school was transferred to the new one. The first teacher was Laura Clow (later Mrs.McCraken of Brockville) who received a salary of $225. Mr.Kenny was the inspector. The caretaker received $15. a year and hard maple wood was purchased for the box stove at $1.19 a cord. In 1891 William Young furnished the material and build a wood shed for $90. [21]

 

The stone used in construction was from another school on the Chemical Road[22]

 

 

Read’s School

(School Section 2- Elizabethtown)

(School Section 30 – Augusta)

 

Read’s Public School, a log structure, was built in 1831 and served the community of Bethel for nearly 50 years until a stone building was erected in 1880 on the same plot of land. The land had originally been donated by UEL Pioneer Guy Carleton Read (1785-1849), The Read family gave their name to the school and the nearby Read’s cemetery which dates back to 1800.

 

The original log school was also used by Methodist circuit riders for church services.

 

Among the early teachers were Jehiel Collins, in the early 1800’s; William Garvey around 1820; John Walker 1854; Tom Henderson 1855; Catherine Wright 1858 and many others. The school was located in Bethel.

(Recorder and Times, Darling Scrapbook Collection Book 3 pgs 17-29)

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Frame building, 28×30 in size, constructed in 1810, condition: Good

1854: Stone building first opened in 1853

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

 

that the request of the Trustees of School Section No 2 be complied with and that the sum of $160.00 clear of all expenses be levied and collected on the assessed rateable property of said school section for school purposes for the current year 1867
That the request of the trustees of School Section No 2 be complied with that the sum of two hundred dollars be levied and collected on the rateable property of said section exclusive of expenses- 1869
that the Clerk order the treasurer to pay the Trustees of School Section No 2 or their order the sum of $160 as part payment of the amount due said section- 1870
that the application of the Trustees of School section No 2 be complied with and the sum of Two hundred and forty dollars be levied and collected on the taxable property of said section exclusive of expenses-1871
that the application of School Trustees Section No 2 be complied with and the sum of $240 be levied and collected on the Taxable property of said section exclusive of expenses 1872[23]

 

 

 

 

 

Redan School

(School Section # 26 – Elizabethtown)

(School Section #20 – Kitley)

 

Redan was settled in the years 1840-1860 by Irish Immigrants. The original inhabitants were the Youngs, the Marshalls, Burnetts, Pritchards, Motts, Richards and Wilsons. The old Richardson homestead here was originally part of a clergy reserve. In 1854 the government released all clergy reserve land to the public and the Richard family took a 100 acre plot in the centre of this community.

 

Redan School was located a short distance from the Mott homestead.  The original schoolhouse was a log structure located near the junction of the Rocksprings and Redan roads. The site is now covered by a swamp.

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: no report

1854: Frame building

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

That the request of the trustees of school section no 26 be excepted and that the sum of $125. be levied and collected on the rateable property for the current year 1862- 1862
that the application of the Trustees of School section No 26 be complied with and the sum of $80 be levied and collected on the rateable property of said School Section exclusive of all expenses-1871
that the application of the Trustees of School Section No 26 be complied with and the sum of $80 dollars be levied and collected on the Taxable property of said section exclusive of expenses-1872
that $36 dollars of Clergy money be divided amongst the School Sections of this Township in the following manner, namely Sections No 1 $10, No 12 $5, No 26 $9, No 27 $9.31 cents, No 28 $5, No 29 $2, No 30 $5, No 31 $6 bring union section all the full Sections will leave the sum of $13.11 cents each and the Clerk ? the sum to be paid to the Trustees of each School Section-1873[24]

 

 

 

Rock School

 

The new Rock School, which stands today as a home, was built in 1937. The school was built of native granite quarried a few yards distant from the school. This new school is located on Hwy 2 west of Brockville, and west of Oakland Cemetery. It is regarded as a model rural public school with accommodations for over 30 pupils, indoor toilets, two cloak rooms, a teacher’s room, store room and a basement playroom.

 

The original Rock School was built in 1844, and stood to the west of the present site. Prior to this stone school and earlier log school stood on the bank of Grants Creek further east of the present location.

 

 

Rock Springs School

(School Section #25 – Elizabethtown)

(School Section # 19 – Kitley)

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: no report

1854: no report

 

 

 

 

Rowes Corners

(School Section # 4)

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Frame building, constructed in 1832, condition: Good

1854: Stone building first opened in 1846

 

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

That the sum of $73. clear of all expenses be levied and collected on the rateable property of school section No 4.-1862
that the application of the trustees of School Section No 4 be received and laid over for further consideration- 1868
that the Trustees of School Section No 4 of Elizabethtown be paid to Samuel McNish agreeable to the request of the Trustees of said Section- 1871
To the Municipal Council of the Township of Elizabethtown in Council assembled, Gentlemen, Please pay Samuel McNish the sum due School Section No 4 of Elizabethtown, signed Sidney Easton and Cyrus Wright- 1871
that James Daniels and John Daniels be relieved from paying School Tax to School Section No 4 amounting to $6.66 cents as said Daniels belong to the Separate School in Brockville and the collector get a copy of this motion- 1872[25]

 

 

 

 

Seeley’s School

(School Section #10)

 

 

The original school building made of stone was built in 1849. The second building was built of brick in 1889, the brick school burned one cold winter’s day on January  26, 1957. Only the bell in the belfry and one baseball bat in the basement were saved. Seeley’s School was built across from North Star Farms at Seeley’s Corners. There were 17 students in the last class at the school in 1957.

 

The growth of the settlement at Seeley’s necessitated the building of a school. In 1849 one was built on the corner of Sawmill Road and that leading to Leetuck, or Lee Road on the farm of Thomas Booth. This location was on the 6 acres purchased by Alexander Stewart. In 1889 the school became crowded and John W. Stewart, rather than have the new one so near his own dellings gave anther lot $50 and drew the bricks from one lot to the other. The first teacher of the new school was Homer Moore. On Sunday January 26, 1957 the building was destroyed by fire. The last teacher was Mrs. Allan Stewart and she and her twenty pupils’ were transported to the Old Lyn Public School. Starting the following September the pupils went to the new Lyn School then to the New Dublin School. (Mrs. Allan Stewart 1967) [26]

 

A teacher’s yearly salary in 1862 was sixty dollars.

 

The original building was probably a one room log building.

 

Old School Victim of Sunday Fire. A venerable brick building built in 1889 was complete. It destroyed by fire of unknown origins. The school had a capacity for 33 pupils, however at the end it had 20 students. Mrs. Alvin Gardiner, residing nearby spotted the fire about 1:10pm. Brockville Fire Department was called, but before the men could receive permission to make the trip, a second call was received stating that nothing could be done to save the building. There was no water supply and the nearby creek was frozen solid. The school was a sturdy building that served the community well during the past 68 years. The building was about 40 feet long and 30 feet wide, it had been the means of education for generations of district youngsters. The current students would be bused by Stewart’s bus lines to the Lyn School. [27]

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Frame building, constructed in 1810, condition: Not Good

1854: Stone building first opened in 1809

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

that the application of the Trustees of School Section No 10 be complied with and the sum of Two Hundred Dollars be levied and collected on the assessed Taxable Property of said section exclusive of expenses for School Purposes[28]

 

 

 

Sherwood Springs School

(School Sectional #3 Elizabethtown)

(School Sectional # 1 Front of Yonge)

 

 

The first school building was made of logs and located on the west side of Sherwood Springs Road, near the site of Jim Eligh’s brick house. It started in 1851, but not opened until January 3, 1854. The second school structure was a framed building built on the north side of Hwy 2 across from where Sherwood Springs Rd. now meets Hwy 2. This building was purchased by Fred Latham and moved down to the opposite side of the road and a second story was added.[29]

 

The third school was located on Hwy 2, where Woodland Park Zoo was built after the school closed. The school built in 1907 was closed in 1956 with an enrolment of 20 students. The original school which closed in 1906 was located in a white house at Latham’s Corners, Susie Doolan was the first teacher.

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Stone building, 30×36 in size, constructed in 1844, condition: Good

1854: report combined with SS#5

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

That the union of School sections no 3 & 5 be dissolved and that all resolutions uniting the same be rendered the same as if said divisions ere never united at the request of a public meeting held for that purpose signed by Henry Clow, Chairman- 1858
Annual school meeting of School Section No 3 of the freeholders and householders of said section, acceptance of financial report; that we have a free school this year; that Wm Clow & Mr.S.Fulford be auditors for the ensuing year; that one chord of wood be delivered at the school house and cut by each scholar that the teacher measure the wood and if it falls short that the person who brought it shall bring another chord; that the persons who send children to school shall board the teacher- 1862
That the petition of the trustees of School Section No 3 be complied with and that the sum of $140. clear of expenses be levied and collected on the rateable property of said school section for school purposes for the currant year 1865
that the Clerk be instructed to prepare a Bylaw to unite School Sections No.3 and No.5 into one section agreeable to the request of the rate payers of said sections- 1869
that the application of the Trustees of School section No.3 be complied with and the sum of $18 be levied and collected on the rateable property of said section exclusive of expenses – 1869
that the Trustees of School Section No 3 be paid the sum of $240 the amount levied on said section for School purposes and the Clerk order the said amount to be paid to William Wilson-1873[30]

 

 

 

Spring Valley School

(School Section #11)

 

 

Spring Valley School was first located at the corner of W.E.Stewarts field to the left of Ruben Davis’ driveway. The original school was an unpainted frame building, that got so old that it could no longer be kept warm in winter. In 1878 the present school was completed farther down the road and opened in September of that year. The foundation for this school was laid in 1877. The land was donated by Frank McCrae on condition that the building be used for both school and church purposes. The first contract to build the new school was not completed and later Harvey Hayes took the contract and hired James Davidson to do the work. Miss Jennie Grant was the first teacher in 1878. The first gathering in the school was a church service on Sunday conducted by Rev.Mr.Blair who was the Pastor of the Lyn Circuit. The enrolment of the school in 1950 was 18 pupils, in 1902 it was 27. (the original name of Spring Valley was Niblock’s Corners)

 

The school had it’s last class on June 29, 1965, students were then bussed to the new school at New Dublin.

 

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Stone building, 22×28 in size, constructed in 1843, condition: Not Good

1854: Frame building first opened in 1816

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

That the sum of 20 pounds clear of all expenses be levied and collected on the rateable property of school section No 11.- 1862
Tax levies for School section No 11- 1862[31]

 

 

Stewarts School

(School Section #1 – Elizabethtown)

(School Section #16 – Augusta)

 

 

Adiel Sherwood inherited Lots 1 & 2 on the death of his father in 1826, and four years later sold Lot 1 to Henry Bradfield, a stone mason. Bradfield who lived here for 50 years also donated land for a school in 1860 (S.S.#1) on the Highway. [32]

 

School Superintendents Report for 1854 shows that the school was made of stone and opened in 1860[33]

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Stone building, 20×26 in size, constructed in 1844, condition: Good

1854: Stone building first opened in 1860

 

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

That the request of the trustees of Union School section No 1 in Elizabethtown and No 1 in the Twp of Augusta be completed and the sum of 90 pounds be levied and collected on that property 1862
that the trustees of School Section No. 1 be paid the sum of $0.67 cts as School tax on 12 acres of land on part Lots 7&8 in the 1st concession of Elizabethtown assessed to William Holms and the clerk order the same to be paid 1870
that the application of the trustees of School Section No 1 be complied with and the sum of $100 be levied and collected on the assessed taxable property of School Section No 1 of the Township of Elizabethtown for school purposes free from all expenses for the year 1870
that the application of the Trustees of School section No 1 be complied with and the sum of $150 be levied and collected on the rateable property of said section exclusive of expenses 1871
that the Trustees of School Section No 1 be paid the sum of $52.82 as balance of the amount levied and collected in said Section for school purposes and the clerk give an order for the same- 1872
that the application of trustees of school section No 1 Elizabethtown be complied with and the sum of $150 be levied and collected and the rateable property of said section for school purposes exclusive of expenses- 1872
that the Trustees of School No 1 be paid the sum of $150 dollars being the amount levied on said section for School purposes and the Clerk order the sae to be paid to Alexander Miller- 1873
that $36 dollars of Clergy money be divided amongst the School Sections of this Township in the following manner, namely Sections No 1 $10, No 12 $5, No 26 $9, No 27 $9.31 cents, No 28 $5, No 29 $2, No 30 $5, No 31 $6 bring union section all the full Sections will leave the sum of $13.11 cents each and the Clerk ? the sum to be paid to the Trustees of each School Section- 1873
that the Trustees of School Section No 1 be paid the sum of $150 dollars being payment of the amount collected on said section for school purposes and the Clerk order the same to be paid to the Trustees[34] – 1873

 

 

 

 

Tin Cap School

(School Section #9)

 

 

The unique name of Tincap was given to the community by some early settlers because the old stone schoolhouse boasted a cupola with a tincap, and as this was the only building of note, Tincap seemed a very suggestive name.

 

The school was burned about 1894, classes were then held for a short time in a stone house owned by Mr.M. O’Donnell.

 

A new frame building was built, it was equipped with a tin cap and bell, to keep this school linked to the original. The first teacher in the new school was Miss. Susie Hanna of Lyn.

 

Here is an excerpt from Alvyn Austin in his unpublished 2000 book “ The History of Elizabeth Township”  The Tin Cap- “ Another more fanciful version is that Breakenridge furnished the militia with ‘tin caps’ during the war of 1812 and placed one on the school cupola, which sparkled in the sun and could be seen for miles. The log schoolhouse was replaced by stone in 1850, which burned in 1894; the present school (the 4th) has a replica of the famous “Tin Cap” in its foyer”

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Stone building, constructed in 1844, condition: Good

1854: Frame building first opened in 1800

 

 

 

Tincap School

New Building

 

 

The new all brick structure was opened on Monday November 7th, 1960. The school continued as a complete grade 1-8 until 1972. At that point the older grades were transferred to Lyn School, and Tincap remained as JK to grade ?,

Until it’s final closure in  2005.

 

 

 

 

Yonge Mills School

(School Section #28 – Elizbethtown)

(School Section # 2 & 3 – Front of Yonge)

 

 

The Yonge Mills School house is located on the Yonge Mills Road, some 3 ½ miles west of the village of Lyn.  On September 26th 1874 a ¾ acre lot was severed from the land owned by Mr. Griffin and Phillips and transferred to the Trustees of the Public School Section. The school opened in 1874 and was in use until its closure in 1968. The school was built from stone and similar to others built around the same time period.

 

In 1954/55 a wall was erected across the room so that the lower level students could be taught by a second teacher. In 1960 a well was dug and a furnace room added. Prior to 1960 the school was without running water and each day a student had to carry a bucket of water from Gardiner’s across the road to the school. The lavatory was divided with the teacher’s in the centre and two on either side for the boys and girls.

 

The first school in Yonge Mills was a wooden structure located on the corner of Devil’s Door Road and County Road 27, opposite Yonge Mills Church. The second school was a brick structure which held classes from 1859 to 1874. The third school was a stone structure built in 1874 and was open until June 1968.

 

In 1956 the enrolment of the school was over 50 pupils. [35]

 

This was a Union School Section some of the pupils coming from Elizabethtown Township and some from Front of Yonge Township.

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: No Report

1854: No Report

 

 

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

that $36 dollars of Clergy money be divided amongst the School Sections of this Township in the following manner, namely Sections No 1 $10, No 12 $5, No 26 $9, No 27 $9.31 cents, No 28 $5, No 29 $2, No 30 $5, No 31 $6 bring union section all the full Sections will leave the sum of $13.11 cents each and the Clerk ? the sum to be paid to the Trustees of each School Section[36]

 

 

 

 

 

Name Unknown (Moores  ??)

Sectional School No. 19

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Log building, 22×28 in size, constructed in 1836, condition: Good

1854: No Report

 

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

introduce a Bylaw to set forth and establish the Boundaries of School Section No 19- Elizabethtown
that said by law do now pass and be entitled ByLaw to set forth and establish the Boundaries of School Section no 19- Elizabethtown
That payment of 7 pounds be given to Peter Buell Section Treasurer of School Section no 19 as uncollected and non resident tax for that section
That the sum of $175. clear of all expenses be levied and collected on the rateable property of school section No 19.
that the clerk be authorized to communicate with the Chief Superintendent of Schools respecting voucher for ten pounds of school moneys for school section No 19 in Elizabethton for the year 1860 to inform him if he received such voucher and if the money is available
That Stephen Scott treasurer be authorized to retain $8.13 from the ten pounds revenue from the Chief Super indent of Education and apply it to school purposes ten pounds being moneys paid for school purposes for school section no 19 out of the funds of this municipality in 1862
that the request of the trustee of school section No 19 be complied with and the sum of sixty dollars clear of all expenses be collected of the assessed house holders and free holders of said section for current year 1867
that the application of the Trustees of school Section No 19 be compiled with and the sum of $160. be levied and collected on the rateable property of said section free of all expense
that the Clerk order the treasurer to pay the Trustees of School Section No 19 or their order the sum of $160 as part payment of the amount due said section
that the Trustees of School Section No 19 be paid the balance of assessment due said section and the clerk order the sum to be paid the William Stafford
that the sum of $150 be levied and collected on the rateable property of School Section No 19 for school expenses agreeable to the request of the Trustees of said Section exclusive of expenses
that the Prayer of the Petition Wm Mott and others be complied with and that rear part of Lot No 9 in the first concession of the Township of Elizabethtown from the corporation of the Town of Brockville back to the Second Concession in said Township be detached from School Section No 32 and attached to School Section No 19 is said Township
that the Trustees of School Section No 19 be paid the sum of $52.31 cents being balance of assessment and such section and the clerk order the same to be paid Charles Wesley ?  ? Of said section[37]

 

 

 

 

Brockville Schools

Sectional School No. 29

 

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

that the Reeve be and is hereby authorised to notify according to law that portion of the Township formerly composed of Union School Section No 29, also School Section No 17 that the council intend to pass a Bylaw to attach the first named portion of the Township to School Section No 17 at the next sitting of the Council on the 4th of Oct next 1871
that $36 dollars of Clergy money be divided amongst the School Sections of this Township in the following manner, namely Sections No 1 $10, No 12 $5, No 26 $9, No 27 $9.31 cents, No 28 $5, No 29 $2, No 30 $5, No 31 $6 bring union section all the full Sections will leave the sum of $13.11 cents each and the Clerk ? the sum to be paid to the Trustees of each School Section[38] 1873

 

 

 

Name Unknown

Sectional School No. 30

 

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

that $36 dollars of Clergy money be divided amongst the School Sections of this Township in the following manner, namely Sections No 1 $10, No 12 $5, No 26 $9, No 27 $9.31 cents, No 28 $5, No 29 $2, No 30 $5, No 31 $6 bring union section all the full Sections will leave the sum of $13.11 cents each and the Clerk ? the sum to be paid to the Trustees of each School Section- 1873 [39]

 

 

 

 

 

Name Unknown

Sectional School No. 31

 

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

that $36 dollars of Clergy money be divided amongst the School Sections of this Township in the following manner, namely Sections No 1 $10, No 12 $5, No 26 $9, No 27 $9.31 cents, No 28 $5, No 29 $2, No 30 $5, No 31 $6 bring union section all the full Sections will leave the sum of $13.11 cents each and the Clerk ? the sum to be paid to the Trustees of each School Section- 1873[40]

 

Name Unknown

Sectional School No. 32

 

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

that the Prayer of the Petition Wm Mott and others be complied with and that rear part of Lot No 9 in the first concession of the Township of Elizabethtown from the corporation of the Town of Brockville back to the Second Concession in said Township be detached from School Section No 32 and attached to School Section No 19 is said Township-1871[41]

 

 

 

 

 

 

Name Unknown

Sectional School No. 33

 

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

that the application of school trustees of School Section No33 in the township of Elizabethtown be complied with and that the sum of seventy five dollars be levied and collected on the taxable property of said section for school purposes exclusive of expenses for the year 1873
that the Clerk be and he is hereby authorized to correct the assessment of school Sect No 33 by adding the assessment of Joseph Miller, John B.Moor and Ruben Per to said Section-1873[42]

 

 

 

 

Sheldon School

 

 

Reference Notes:

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

(Petition) To the Honourable Council in New Dublin Assembled; The humble petition of the undersigned most humbly requests that your honourable body will be pleased to grant a sum of money on road section leading from the town line of Kitley to Johnston School House partly between Lots No twenty one and twenty two in the eleventh concession of Elizabethtown the ? obstruction is a steep precipice which is very injurious to the traveling community for which your petitioners shall as in duty bound for ever pray (signed) Bouf W Tackaberry, ?, Joseph Portes, Jacob Smith, S,Johnston. John Humpres-1854
that the clerk be authorized to prepare a Bylaw to Divide the township of Elizabethtown into two Electoral Divisions for elections purposes the first division to be five front concessions and the poling place to be at the Stone School house near the tin cap in the third concession of said township and the second division to consist of the six read concessions of said township and the poling place to be at the town hall at Dublin Corners-1866
that the request of the Trustees of School Section No ? be complied with and that the sum of $85.00 free of all expenses be levied and collected on the assessed rateable property of said school section for school purposes for the current year-1867

 

 

[1] Greenbush and Addison Villages a look at the history and homes by Karen Clout BA pub 1994

[2] The Recorder & Times Apr 11, 1927 “ Fairfield and its Pioneers by Mrs. H.E.Pyke

[3] The History of Elizabethtown Township, by Alvyn Austin unpublished 2002

 

[4] Lyn Museum Archives

[5] Greenbush and Addison Villages a look at the history and homes by Karen Clout BA pub 1994

[6] Lyn Museum Archives

[7] An unfinished history of Elizabethtown Township 2000 by Alvyn Austin

 

[8] Lyn Museum Archives

 

[9] Lyn Museum Archives

[10] Board of Trustees Annual report for 1946

 

[11] Focus on the District by Harry Painting February 1980

 

[12] Lyn Museum Archives

[13] Lyn 1784-1984 by Mary G.Robb

[14] Women’s Institute History Book 3 page 159

 

[15] Women’s Institute History Book 3 Pg 167

 

[16] Lyn Museum Archives

[17] Lyn Museum Archives

[18] yn Museum Archives

[19] Lyn Museum Archives

[20] Recorder & Times May 1965

[21] Women’s Institute History Book 3 Pg 175

[22] Lyn 1784-1984 by Mary Robb

[23] Lyn Museum Archives

[24] Lyn Museum Archives

[25] Lyn Museum Archives

[26] Women’s Institute History Book 3 page 174

[27] The Recorder and Times Jan 1957

[28] Lyn Museum Archives

[29] Education in Front of Yonge 1784-2000 by Sandra Wells 2008

[30] Lyn Museum Archives

[31] Lyn Museum Archives

[32] The History of Elizabethtown by Alvyn Austin 2002

[33] Archives Ontario- Microfisch No.

[34] Lyn Museum Archives

[35] A brief history of Yonge Mills School by Joe Moore 1997

[36] Lyn Museum Archives

[37] Lyn Museum Archives

[38] Lyn Museum Archives

[39] Lyn Museum Archives

[40] Lyn Museum Archives

[41] Lyn Museum Archives

[42] Lyn Museum Archives

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