New Dublin- A Hamlet in Elizabethtown

New Dublin (Lamb’s Pond; Dublin Corners)2 New Dublin

 

Lamb’s Pond was the original name of this settlement, the name being taken from a mile long body of water on the Lamb Homestead.

 

Nicholas Burns was born in Dublin, Ireland and as a lad of 19, migrated to Canada in 1820. He settled at Lamb’s Pond in Elizabethtown Township and when a community was developed there he was instrumental in renaming the hamlet “New Dublin”, obviously in honour of his own birthplace. Burns did not remain long in New Dublin, for history records that he established his permanent home on Gosford Road, east of the community known as Gosford, about 1822.

 

When the municipal form of government came to the townships and villages of Leeds and Grenville Counties in 1850, New Dublin was chosen as the township seat. Jacob A. Brown, the area’s first school inspector, was named as the first clerk of the township and he was succeeded some 20 years later by his son Nicholas.

New Dublin had a mill that was set up around 1840 and was operated for years by Byron Cadwell. At the same time, it is probable that the Eyres had a grist mill on their homestead east of New Dublin. Cadwell’s mill was taken down in the 1890’s by Ira Mallory, who used it as a saw mill and cheese box factory until 1923, when he closed it. Orville Brundige ran the mill with steam power for several years, but it was abandoned around 1960. It was subsequently demolished and nothing remains of the old factory. The village also boasted a tannery, cheese plant and other small industries that turned out various products.

 

In 1830 Christ Church was opened and this house of worship served the community for 64 years, until the present St. John the Evangelist was dedicated on the same site. The first church was built as an outpost of St. Peters in Brockville, since many of the residents of the area attended St. Peter’s and required a house of worship of their own. The church was built with tall Grecian pillars and when the building was torn down in 1893 to

New Dublin St John The Evangelist July 2016 (2)
St.John the Evangelist- July 2016

make way for St. John the Evangelist, the front pillars were rescued. They were moved, and graced the front porch of the Webster homestead at Bellamy’s.

 

New Dublin St John The Evangelist July 2016 (1)
St. John the Evangelist – July 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

new-dublin-anglican-church
St. John the Evangelist c1900

 

 

 

The congregation took the step of demolishing the old church because it was too small and in a bad state of repair. It was decided that renovations would be too costly and a new church was erected. On July 6, 1893, the cornerstone of the new church was laid with the appropriate ceremonies. The land for this church was donated by John Burns Sr. and John Burns Jr.

 

 

 

 

 

Families of New Dublin

The names of the Rowsome, Bolton, Moore, Eyre, Bissonette and Horton families dominated the early history of this area.

New Dublin Bissonnette, Rosealie Darling bk3p152
Rosealie Bissonnett
New Dublin Bissonette, Antoine Darling bk3p152
Antoine Bissonette

 

 

 

 

New Dublin Horton Family Darling bk3p150 - Copy
Horton Family

 

New Dublin Horton, William Henry Darling Bk3p148
William Henry Horton
New Dublin Bissonnett, Joseph and Georgina Darling bk3p154
Joseph and Georgina Bissonnett
New Dublin Healey and Horton Wedding 1903 Darling bk3p144 - Copy
Healey and Horton Wedding 1903

 

New Dublin Bolton House 1900 left Henry and Sarah Bolton buggy is William Bolton Darling Bk3p149
Bolton Home 1900 to the left if Henry and Sarah Bolton seated in the buggy is William Bolton

Thomas and Jane Eyre emigrated from County Wexford, Ireland in 1817 and settled just east of New Dublin. With them came their sons, Henry b.1801; Thomas b.1803; and William b.1809. The Eyre’s had three more children after they arrived here, John, Samson and Thomasiana. The original Eyre homestead stands near the Bellamy’s crossing of the CPR line between Brockville and Smiths Falls. The house was build by Thomas Eyre, from stone that was quarried from a field a short distance away. (Recorder and Times, Darling Collection Book 3)

“By the 1880’s, New Dublin was a busy industrial village, with a grist mill and sawmill nearby and roads in all directions. Accordingly, in a spirit of civic pride, the village had a building boom. This was when the infrastructure was built, four stone buildings, all in miniature: a new Anglican church and a Methodist Chapel, a school, and the crowning glory, the Township Hall. About the same time, in an effort to clean up New Dublin, a general store replaced the tavern where Ogle Gowan used to drink with the lads. Nevertheless, the backbone of New Dublin remain the Irish settlement of John Burns and Nicholas Horton.”(Elizabethtown: The Last of the Royal Townships by Alvyn Austin pub 2009)

Elizabethtown Offices July 2016 (1)
Elizabethtown-Kitley Township Office – July 2016

 

 

 

New Dublin Methodist Ch Juy 2016 (2)
Methodist Church- July 2016
New Dublin Methodist Ch Juy 2016 (1)
Methodist Church – July 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Dublin School SS15 - New Dublin Scrapbook (2)
New Dublin School Class – date unknown
New Dublin School 1917- New Dublin Scrapbook (1)
New Dublin School Class of 1917
New Dublin School 1896- New Dublin Scrapbook
New Dublin School Class of 1896

 

New Dublin School photo- New Dublin Scrapbook
New Dublin School- SS#15

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Dublin workers at Ira Mallory SAwmill 1920's Darling Bk3p155
Workers at Ira Mallory Sawmill c1920’s
Yarn Spinning Bee- New Dublin Scrapbook
Yarn Spinning Bee
New Dublin General Store- New Dublin Scrapbook
New Dublin General Store
New Dublin Robert Earl Leavitt P146
Robert Earl’s Home taken from Leavitt’s History of Leeds and Grenville pub 1879
New Dublin John Earl Leavitt p146
John Earl’s Home at New Dublin taken from Leavitt’s History of Leeds and Grenville pub 1879
3 Dublin's Corners
Dublin’s Corners Map from 1861-61

 

 

Humour New Dublin 06.16 P32b
New Dublin Post Card c1910

 

 

 

“Edna’s Scrapbook”

is a paperback book written by Edna B. Chant and was published in 1998. Edna Chant was a reported with the “Athens Reporter” for 23 years and she is the author of four books.

Her book, which is made up of news clippings from various sources, from which we have taken excerpts, gives us a glimpse into life in our area for over a hundred year period ending with stories from 1975.

While her book covers many areas of Leeds and Grenville we have only focused on the area within Elizabethtown-Kitley Township.

New Dublin

 Robert Bolton, aged 20 years, of New Dublin, was drowned in the St. Lawrence River on July 31, 1895. He and a friend, Leslie Row, took a canoe, and started out for a paddle but the wind came up and they decided to turn back. However, as they attempted to turn the canoe capsized and both were thrown into the water. Both could swim a little but they clung to the boat, calling for help. A Mr. Stevens heard their cries and went out in his boat to help them. Just as he reached them, Bolton slipped beneath the surface and did not reappear. Row was rescued and they spent an hour looking for Boulton. His body was not found until August 6th, a mile away at Morristown, NY.

The following article was written on May 12, 1985 by Stanley W. Cadwell of Solvay, NY in his 90th year:

“The first man to settle at New Dublin was named Lamb and as there was a small body of water nearby, the settlement became known as Lamb’s Pond. Not long after this several Irish Immigrants moved in and the hamlet was named “New Dublin”. The store at the four corners was owned by a man named Sheppard Rowsome, who also ran the post office in the store. Directly across the road was the home of a Mr. Barry. The house between that and the old school, which was built in 1890, was the home of a stone mason, Aaeron Sherman. Between there and Glen Buell were settlers named Bolton, Walker and Davis. These people were farmers. At the four corners lived a man named Kendrick. He raised bees and sold honey. On the same road was the blacksmith shop, owned and operated by Len Orr. At the foot of the hill on the same side of the road lived the father and mother of Len Orr. Directly across the road lived a family named Sheridan. My father, Byron Cadwell, and my mother lived in Athens and were married in 1872. Dad and his father operated a carriage shop where they made wagons, sleighs and some furniture. At that time, there was a sawmill for sale in New Dublin and dad purchased it in 1886 and they moved to New Dublin. He bought a piece of land across from the mill, where he built a home in 1887. I wish to say at this point that there was probably no better constructed house anywhere. Dad used to say if there was anything worth doing, it was worth doing right. And at that time he fully expected to spend the rest of his life there. He used only the best materials, and even then realized the importance of insulation, as he filled the walls from foundation to the eaves with the course sawdust from the mill. My mother used to say it was the warmest in winter and the coolest in summer of any house she had ever known. He guilt an addition to include a grist mill, and he also made cheese boxes and shingles. All this was done before I was born. The youngest of four children, I was born September 24th, 1896 and attended the old school. In 1903 my father was badly injured when a truckload of lumber fell on him at the mill. This made it impossible for him to carry on the business and in 1904 he sold it to Ira Mallory of Brockville. We then moved to Brockville where we lived for four years, and then moved to our present address in New York State.”

It is quite unusual to have a wedding at two o’clock in the morning, nut it happened in April 1907. Miss. McConkey of New Dublin was to marry Mr. Justus of Chesterville at her father’s home at seven o’clock in the evening. It started to snow about four o’clock and soon turned into a real old fashioned blizzard. The guests began to arrive and Rev. Cannon Grout who only had to come from Lyn, also got there although the roads were rapidly filling in. However the groom didn’t come. But the bride didn’t loose faith and said he would come. Games were played and every effort made to make the waiting plesant and at midnight the wedding supper was served. Then about 1:30 am the groom arrived very cold and tired but ready for the ceremony which was held as soon as hot drinks and warm kisses had revived him.

On February 27, 1911 J.H. Rowsome’s store and outbuildings burned at New Dublin.

A very unusual occurrence took place at the home of William Rowley of New Dublin on October 21, 1913. His aged mother Mrs. Solomon Rowley had been ill with heart trouble, and his youngest child Margaret, aged eight months, had also been ill for several days. On Tuesday, October 21st, they both died in the same room at the same minute of the same hour.

On September 2, 1948 Ivan Stewart of New Dublin drowned at Cornwall.

On February 21, 1966 an early morning fire destroyed a home in New Dublin and claimed the life of seven year old Frederick Donald Meilleur.

Arner Brundige, 62, of New Dublin was killed in a truck crash on October 10, 1974.

Clifford Crummy, 43, was killed by a train at New Dublin on December 23, 1975.

5 thoughts on “New Dublin- A Hamlet in Elizabethtown

    1. Good morning Sharon,

      Thank you for that great photo of the church in New Dublin. If it’s all right with you I will add it to our post on New Dublin.

      I read through your blog, and I must say it is interesting and very well done, congratulations. I don’t know if you ever heard of a small soft covered book called “Edna’s Scrapbook”, it contains news clippings she collected og this area. I am going through it for articles of interest and so far have come across two in which the Bolton name is mentioned. I don’t know if there is a connection with you or not but thought you might find them of interest.

      “Robert Bolton, aged 20 years, of New Dublin, was drowned in the St. Lawrence River on July 31, 1895. He and a friend, Leslie Row, took a canoe, and started out for a paddle but the wind came up and they decided to turn back. However, as they attempted to turn the canoe capsized and both were thrown into the water. Both could swim a little but they clung to the boat, calling for help. A Mr. Stevens heard their cries and went out in his boat to help them. Just as he reached them, Bolton slipped beneath the surface and did not reappear. Row was rescued and they spent an hour looking for Boulton. His body was not found until August 6th, a mile away at Morristown, NY.”

      The following article was written on May 12, 1985 by Stanley W. Cadwell of Solvay, NY in his 90th year.
      “The first man to settle at New Dublin was named Lamb and as there was a small body of water nearby, the settlement became known as Lamb’s Pond. Not long after this several Irish Immigrants moved in and the hamlet was named “New Dublin”. The store at the four corners was owned by a man named Sheppard Rowsome, who also ran the post office in the store. Directly across the road was the home of a Mr. Barry. The house between that and the old school, which was built in 1890, was the home of a stone mason, Aaeron Sherman. Between there and Glen Buell were settlers named Bolton, Walker and Davis. These people were farmers. At the four corners lived a man named Kendrick. He raised bees and sold honey. On the same road was the blacksmith shop, owned and operated by Len Orr. At the foot of the hill on the same side of the road lived the father and mother of Len Orr. Directly across the road lived a family named Sheridan. My father, Byron Cadwell, and my mother lived in Athens and were married in 1872. Dad and his father operated a carriage shop where they made wagons, sleighs and some furniture. At that time, there was a sawmill for sale in New Dublin and dad purchased it in 1886 and they moved to New Dublin. He bought a piece of land across from the mill, where he built a home in 1887. I wish to say at this point that there was probably no better constructed house anywhere. Dad used to say if there was anything worth doing, it was worth doing right. And at that time he fully expected to spend the rest of his life there. He used only the best materials, and even then realized the importance of insulation, as he filled the walls from foundation to the eaves with the course sawdust from the mill. My mother used to say it was the warmest in winter and the coolest in summer of any house she had ever known. He guilt an addition to include a grist mill, and he also made cheese boxes and shingles. All this was done before I was born. The youngest of four children, I was born September 24th, 1896 and attended the old school. In 1903 my father was badly injured when a truckload of lumber fell on him at the mill. This made it impossible for him to carry on the business and in 1904 he sold it to Ira Mallory of Brockville. We then moved to Brockville where we lived for four years, and then moved to our present address in New York State.”

      Thanks again for thinking of us, John Mack

  1. Thanks for that, John! I will file it away for future reference.
    Great website – I’ve spent quite a while browsing and loved the YouTube tour as well. Keep up the rest work!

  2. I was looking for more history on my house I had purchased last August. I bought the house that the Boltons lived in. I’m sure it’s the same house. Now the address is 3102 county rd 29 .. I was looking for images an who first built it. Curious of the history. Such an intesting home. I love it.

    1. Hi, Is the stone house we have posted as Bouton’s House in 1900 the same one as you have on Hwy 29 ? Everything we have has been posted on the website. However keep looking on the website as you never know when something else might come to light.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *