Halleck’s – A One Room School House in Elizabethtown

Halleck’s School 

(School Section #5)

hallecks-school-1861-62-map
Location of school from map of 1861-62

 

On June 28, 1963 the school rang its’ bell for the last time. The teacher at the time was Mrs. Marion Ross, and she was the last person to teach at the little brick school house located on the Halleck’s Road. The 27 remaining pupils from this school were transferred to the Lyn Public School. About 10 years prior there were 34 pupils in the school

The original school was a log school house located in the north corner of the Hallecks Road and No. 2 Highway. Rev. William Hallock built a school before 1810 which had a ready made class: with 16 Coles, 13 Clows, 10 or 12 Fulfords and his own six children. The brick school house was built further north on the Halleck’s Road around 1839. The land on which the present school was built was donated by Mr. Caleb Halloch (Squire Halloch) on May 12, 1838 and was built by Archibald Davidson, a stone mason.

The school was replaced by the present building in 1935, a trim neo-classical brick Edifice.[2] A well was drilled for the new school in the 1930’s and toilets were installed around 1939. In the early 1940’s electricity was installed. Between 1886 and 1900 teachers salaries’ were from $220. to $300 per year.

Heritage Elizabethtown erected a plaque near the original school recalling an incident that took place during the War of 1812. The plaque reads as follows:

Hallock’s School and the ‘Underhill Incident’

“A one room school near here was the site of an international incident before the war of 1812. William Hallock (1770-1836), a Methodist preacher, established the school in a log cabin on his property. In 1809 the teacher was Isaac Underhill, an alleged American army deserter. On May 1, three American soldiers disembarked from a schooner on the St. Lawrence, seized Underhill at the school and dragged him, bound and gagged towards the river. When Underhill broke free and ran, his captors shot him from behind. They then fled to their boat with armed settlers in pursuit. Underhill died the next day. His murder was a flagrant violation of British sovereignty which outraged Canadians and lingered long on local memory” (Issac Underhill is said to be buried in an unmarked grave in the Fulford Cemetery)

The old school was converted into a home and is located at 2301 Hallecks Rd.N.

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Frame Building, size 24×34, construction date 1811, condition: Not Good

1854: Frame building, first opened in 1817 (this report combines SS #3 and 5)

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1872

 

That the union of School sections no 3 & 5 be dissolved and that all resolutions uniting the same be rendered the same as if said divisions ere never united at the request of a public meeting held for that purpose signed by Henry Clow, Chairman- 1858
that the Clerk be instructed to prepare a Bylaw to unite School Sections No.3 and No.5 into one section agreeable to the request of the rate payers of said sections- 1869
that the application of the Trustees of School Section No 5 be complied with and the sum of $200 be levied and collected on the Taxable property of said section exclusive of expenses -1872[1]

[1] Lyn Museum Archives

[2] Elizabethtown: The Last of the Royal Townships by Alvyn Austin pub. 2009

Halleck's School SF6#11
Halleck’s School

 

Halleck's School Class of 1896 SF6#13
Class of 1896

 

 

 

Halleck's School Fair 1937-38 Teacher Anna Hudson SF6#18
1937-38 School Fair, Anna Hudson teacher
Halleck's School Fair SF6#1
School Fair
Halleck's School 1938-1939 SF6#5a
Class of 1938-39

 

 

 

One thought to “Halleck’s – A One Room School House in Elizabethtown”

  1. Thank you for this exhibit. Rev. Hallock was an ancestor of mine. From what I’ve been able to discern, his school was every bit his passion as was his vocation as a presbyter.

    Again, Thank You!

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