Lyn Historical Facts

Some Historical Facts for Lyn

 

Bark Flats

First School Fair Sep 21 1915 on the tan bark WI bk4p319
Lyn School Fair Sep 21, 1915 on the Bark Flats

When the tannery owned by Henry Booth was in operation, the flat south of the village was covered with hemlock bark brought in by the farmers in the winter. This bark was used in the tanning of hides and some of the residue was used in insulating homes. The soil on this flat is still made up of hemlock bark. (J.McCrady) (1)

 

 

 

Business

Bakery

The home now owned by Mr.& Mrs. Charles Cross was at one time a bake shop in which Mr. Serviss baked bread. Mr. Serviss was assisted in starting in business by Mr. James Cumming who gave him his first flour. Mr. Serviss’ son Dick peddled the bread around the village and surrounding area with a horse and wagon (sleigh in the winter). The bread was sold unwrapped.(1)

Coon's Bakery Lyn WB1
Coon’s Bakery on Main Street, Lyn

The next bake shop was owned by Wilfred Coon who baked in the shop where Mr.Serviss did, but sold the bread from a store under the Oddfellow’s Hall.(1)

 

 

 

 

Cheese Factories

There were several cheese factories in and around Lyn. One stone building, still standing is on the Centennial (Howard) Road on the Howard (Pietersma) Farm. It was one of the first. Two miles west of the village was the Union Cheese Factory.(2)

 

 

Mills

The first flour mill was located in a large building on Main St. East, which was burned. After closing this flour mill the building housed the Post Office and a store run by Omer Mallory, and later by Mr. Walter Billings. (1)

Main St Lyn WB4 Pond #24
The first mill was located to the right of the dam on the Lyn Pond

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By 1860 R.Coleman & Co. had built the 5 story mill in the Lyn Valley. The Lyn Manufacturing Co. larger than anything ever attempted in Eastern Ontario. There was a 50’ drop from Lyn Mill Pond down to this facility where it powered 5 separate mill operations including Grist; Saw and Tanneries. The flour mill produced 300 bags a day of several different brands of flour.(3)

Mill at Lyn WB3 (1)
The Grist Mill was the five story building on the left, the other buildings composed the Tannery, Shoe Last Factory and Saw Mill

 

 

 

 

Shoe Factory, Tannery and other buildings were destroyed by fire in 1914(1)

 

 

 

General Store

The first store seems to have been run by a druggist named Mr. A.T.Trickey. Mr. Gardner bought the store from Mr. Trickey in 1885, he was not a druggist so he hired Mr. C.M.Taylor who later became his son-in-law. The store was then sold to the McCrady family. (2)

C.M.Taylor Drugs 1911 Darling Bk.1P12
C.M.Taylor Drugs c1911

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other Businesses

Lowell’s Directory for 1871 listed the following businesses:

Bulloch Coleman- manufacture of lasts, boot trees, pegs and dies, decoy ducks etc.

James Coleman- Harness Maker

Erastus Cook- manufacture

J.Cooper & Co. sheepskin tannery

Ambrose Curtis – Miller

Horton & Taylor – Hub and spoke makers

Hover and Co- Vulcanite rubber comb works

Lyn Flour and Grist Mills

George McNish – Iron Foundry

Horace E.Rowe – Chinese Blood and Liver Syrups

William Thompson- Carriage Maker

Henry Lee- Butcher

S.B.William – Cheesemaker (2)

 

 

Cemeteries

Howard Cemetery: off of the Centennial (Howard) Road. At the Parslow Road. Early stones in this cemetery were made of marble as granite was not used until after 1810.

Fulford Pioneer Cemetery (Fulford Point Road): Dedicated approximately 1786. This cemetery is one of the earliest cemeteries in Leeds County; One of the earliest burial grounds of United Empire Loyalists in the Region.

The land was given by Jonathan Fulford, born in Wallingford, Connecticut and was a Sergeant in Jessup’s Corps.  He was granted 108 acres of land on Lot 28 in Concession 1, Elizabethtown.  John and Jacob Elliot shared Lot 29, Adam Cole had Lot 31 and Lot 30 went to Thomas Sparham.  Lots were drawn from a hat, not chosen.

The first grave in the burial ground was Jonathan’s infant son, on June 7th, 1786.  Families using this private burial ground have been descendants of Jonathan Fulford, and shared by the Cole family.  Jonathan’s sister, Thankful Fulford, married Adam Cole before the war, which suggests that Cole also came from Connecticut.  Cole was a private in Jessup’s Corps.  Through intermarriage, the families of John and Jacob Elliot also used the burial ground.  Robinsons are also buried there.

Lyn Cemetery: Located behind St.John’s Anglican Church, it was dedicated sometime around 1790. The oldest known stone in the cemetery marks Able Coleman’s grave and reads “In memory of Able Coleman who departed this life in full assurance of eternal life”(1765-1810)

Yonge Mills Cemetery: Surrounds the little stone church. It was built in 1837 on land donated by Peter Purvis. When the Grand Trunk Railway was built the tracks were laid right through the middle of the cemetery. (located west of Lyn)

Oakland Cemetery: Located on Hwy #2 just west of the Lyn Road is the main cemetery for this area.

Churches

Bricks from the Methodist Church blown down in a severe windstorm on Jan 21 1890 were used in the building of the GlenBuell Church in 1890. The old Methodist Church on the hill was blown away, all that is left is the spire, part of the church being carried across the road into Cumming’s orchard.(1)

The facts about the earliest church are unclear but there seems to have been a small log church called Union or perhaps St.Paul’s, just east of the present St.John the Baptist Church. Various denominations used this facility.(2)

The Methodists seem to have been the first to build a church. Eventually there were two Methodists Churches in Lyn, one a brick church at the top of the hill, and the other near the stone school house on Main St. The Episcopal Methodist Church blew down in a severe storm and the one still stands and was transferred to St. Andrews R.C. Church in 1965 (Now Closed) (cor of Church and Main Sts.)(2)

The Presbyterian congregation got under way in the early 1800’s. The first services were held in Brownson’s Hotel in Lyn. (2)

Anglican Church- a site was chosen in 1859 and the land obtained through the generosity of James Coleman. Construction began in 1860 but as halted due to financial problems. In 1869 it was completed and dedicated.

 

Electricity

Electricity was brought to Lyn in 1929. This meant the discarding of the old coal-oil lamps.(1)

 

Entertainment

Lyn Band- was a well know and popular band. They played at most affairs in and around Lyn but would go as far as Frankville, Mallorytown and to Morristown, NY. They had a band wagon pulled by two mules. The band seems to have disbanded sometime after 1911.(2)

Lyn Band 1914 WI Bk3P182
Lyn Band in 1914

 

Lyn Band Morristown NY 1911 WB1 (3)
Lyn Band performing in Morristown, NY 1911

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clows Band was another popular group who entertained at many gay functions (2)

 

Hotels

Mike Stack's Hotel Darling Bk.1P24
Stack’s Hotel

Stack’s Hotel on Main Street, a large three story brick and stone building.

 

It burned down and is no longer there.

 

 

 

 

The Coleman at 5&7 Main St across from the pump. Construction was started in 1911 and finished in 1912. It was used by commuters on the B&W RR. Charlie Lewis built the front porch from used cedar from a caboose. The stone part of the house (The back addition) was used as a kitchen. The stable which is now gone had a hired hands quarters for people arriving by horse. Which was included in their lodging as well as their meal. Know as the oldest building in Lyn 1814,

Coleman Hotel 1928 WB6 Streets
Coleman Hotel 1926

The Brownson’s which became the Glasford House which became the Willson Hotel cor. of Main and Perth St. (built in 1814)

 

Wilson Hotel WB2
Willson House Hotel

 

 

The Ross House location unknown, information from newspaper ad dated April 1874.

 

 

 

Lyn Village

A by-law passed in 1912 by the Counties Council elected Lyn into a Police Village (1)

The original name was “Coleman’s Corners”, this was changed in 1837 to Lowell because some of the early settlers came from Lowell, Mass. It was then discovered that there was another Lowell in Ontario. The name of “Lyn” was then chosen as descriptive of the natural setting. The clear streams of water used to drive the mill wheels suggested a Welsh or Scottish word “Linn” – a pool, a stream or cascade. (2)

 

Mines, Pyrite

The Billings Pyrite Mine on the Chemical Road (Old Red Road) was perhaps the largest. The Shipman Mine on Halleck’s Road was another producer of pyrite but it was short lived due to the high pyrrhotite content which was an undesirable mineral and the short mining season. The Brockville Chemical & Superphosphate Co. atShipman's Pyrite Mine WB#6 the foot of Ford St. in Brockville converted the pyrites into sulphuric acid, fertilizer and dynamite and was a pioneer in the “lead chamber process” for the distilling of sulphuric and hydrochloric acids. (c1850)

 

 

 

 

 

People

Dr. George W.Judson a physician who practiced at Westport, Lyn and Athens was born in Kitley in 1856. He died in 1924. (1)

Richard Coleman, who played a leading part in the development of Lyn died in 1861 at age 72 (1)

Walter K.Billings, a prominent Lyn Merchant and author of “How Dear to My Hear’ was born in 1871 (1)

Anson Andrew McNish  1878 to 1959  He was born in Lyn the only son of George Peter McNish (1838-1914) and Catherine E. Manhard (1843-1893). Anson married Antoinette “Nettie” Brookman (1874-1944) of Brooklyn, NYC. They had one daughter Florence Catherine born in 1913 in Weston, Ontario who unfortunately died at the age of 15 in 1928 in Fultonville, NY.

Anson is important to our history because he was an amateur photographer and through his lens has given us some of the earliest and best preserved photos of Lyn and the places he lived and visited. His attention to detail and the composition of his photos, considering the photographic equipment he had available to him, is incredible

Able Coleman died April 25, 1810 (3)

RCMP Const. Douglas Scott of Lyn was shot and killed in the Baffin Island hamlet of Kimmirut in 2007. The park and ball diamond on Main Street was named in his honour.

 

Post Office

The first post office was established in Lyn in 1851 (2)

 

Recreation

Centeen Park: Centennial Park Opened Nov 18 1967

With Solemn dedication followed by a ribbon cutting ceremony one of Elizabethtown’s two Centennial parks was officially opened Saturday. Prefaced by a grand parade and other carnival activities in the village of Lyn, the opening ceremony drew a large crowd.

Lyn Valley Conservation Area: What used to be an old sand and gravel quarry has been turned into an attractive and very functional swimming and recreation spot for everyone’s enjoyment. Featuring a swimming area, known locally as Lyn Pit, complete with sandy beach and changing facilities, the swimming area

Lyn Pit 1975- WI Bk5 p381
Lyn Conservation Swimming Area 1975

in the Lyn Valley Conservation Area is the perfect location for a day at the beach. Picnic facilities are available next to the water.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Roads

The toll gates on the Lyn Road were removed on January 1st, 1911(1)

The toll gate was located where Burnbrae Farms now stands. The charge at the toll gate was one way 3 cents and 5 cents return. (2)

Toll Gate Lyn Rd c1890 PAB 14 F3 #13
Lyn Road Toll Gate c1890

 

 

The Lyn Road which passes through Lyn as Main Street was important during the war of 1812 as the main artery between Brockville and Kingston (via Yonges Mills)

 

 

 

Waterways

A deed registered in 1852 showed that Richard Coleman had water rights on Lyn Pond (it bordered Main Street, where the ball park now resides). People owning land in the country leading to the pond had to give the Colemans the privilege of flooding the land to the high water mark. Temperance Lake which was the headwater was kept full by a dam. When opened the water flowed into Centre Lake and then to Lee Pond. There was another dam which when opened allowed the water to flow from Centre Lake into Graham  Lake. A gate at Lee Pond allowed the water level in the Lyn Pond to be controlled. A man made ditch was dug between Lee Pond and the Lyn Pond. (2)

 

Richard Coleman II was the mastermind behind buying up land and creating a watershed in the surrounding area to feed water to his mills. He started in the 1840’s by buying an existing mill on Temperance Lake, about 15 miles north which controlled the flow of water into the Gananoque River. Coleman did not purchase the mill to use, but to block the stream and reverseits’ current, he bought another mill at McIntosh Mills south of Athens, there he built what was officially called the March (or marsh) Bridge Dam, a half mile bridge of grass covered masonry.

 

This Marsh Bridge dam shut off the supply of water that ran between McIntosh Mills and Temperance Lake which created Graham Lake a large pond seven miles long and Centre Lake (also known as Stump Lake). The next undertaking was to cut a canal between them, 15’ wide and 10’ deep to create East Lake (Lee’s Pond) a 600 acre reservoir which would feed the millpond in the village of Lyn (Lyn Pond) (3)

Lee Pond WI bk4p318
Lee Pond
Lee Pond Dam WI bk4p318 (2)
Lee Pond Dam
Lyn Pond c1973 WI bk4p339 (1)
Lyn Pond c1950

 

Lyn Pond c1910 McNish Coll p27
Lyn Pond c1910

 

 

Area Facts

Temperance Lake is named after a group of temperance minded people who started and operated mills at the mouth of the lake previous to 1840.(1)

Centennial Park: A mill stone recovered from the original flour mill built in 1859 was incorporated in the wall in front of the Centennial Park built beside the old fire hall in Lyn in 1967 (D.R.McCrady)(1)

 

 

1- Taken from notes found in the Lyn Museum

2- Lyn 1784-1984 by Mary G.Robb

3- Elizabethtown: The Last of the Royal Townships by Alvyn Austin

Lyn Grist and Flour Mill

Lyn Grist and Four Mill

The original Lyn Mill was located on Main Street near the By-Wash. The original mill burned and was replaced by a second mill in the same location. This mill burned as well, and this time was not rebuilt, but a new mill was built below the village.

“In 1859 the Coleman’s rebuilt and improved their grist mill. James Coleman put up what was the tallest mill in Eastern Ontario, rising five floors above the valley floor at Lyn. It had more powerful yet simple machinery.

After the Coleman business was taken over by the Bank of Upper Canada, a Mr. J. Cumming, who had worked for the Coleman’s, bought it. He in turn, re-modelled the mill and it was said to be the latest thing in flour mill equipment. It turned out 300 bags of flour a day, of several different bands. In his advertisement he stated, ‘The popularity of my various brands for over 25 years is largely owing to the careful blending of the Hard wheat for strength, the Red winter for flavour, and the White fall for colour’. Mr. Cumming was an outstanding business man and a leading citizen of this community. He was killed in a train accident in 1916. His son, Gordon, ran the mill until its closure in 1933” (1)

Unfortunately there are no records of the business conducted at the mill. The only remaining artefacts from the mill are located within the Heritage Place Museum. Stones from the mill have been incorporated into the internal design of the museum in the front room.

(1) Lyn 1784-1984 by Mary G.Robb

Mill at Lyn WB3 (1)

 

 

Lyn Flour Mill (3) Lyn Flour Mill (4) Lyn Mill Ont Archives Photo copyrighted WB3 Mill at Lyn WB3 (3) Flour Mill Mills 1 WB3Lyn Mills 1881 Carson Bk1P18
Lyn Flour Mill (5) Lyn Flour Mill (2) Inside Old Mill WB3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elizabethtown – The Early Years

Elizabethtown Township

Elizabethtown was named in honour of Princess Elizabeth, the third daughter and seventh child of King George III and Queen Charlotte. According to a recent biography, she lived an unhappy, cloistered life. Vivacious and pretty as a child, she inherited an unfortunate tendency to corpulence as she grew older. She was “artistic, emotional, bossy and outspoken,” and despite her “Heart’s Desire” to be a wife, she seemed destined to remain a spinster.

Princess Elizabeth
Princess Elizabeth

How far away her world was from pioneer Elizabethtown! And yet 6000 miles away Elizabethtown people were among the most ardent royalists anywhere in the British Empire.

Elizabethtown was the first and only township in Leeds County to be surveyed in 1874. In Elizabethtown, Upper Canada, as roads were built and communities grew, the names grew spontaneously out of the soil: the Tin Cap; Hayes’ Corners, Olds’s Corners. As each community aspired to greatness, they changed their names. By the 1830s during the political troubles which exploded in the rebellion of 1837, the idea of ‘loyalty’ among ‘American’ settlers was questioned, and ‘Yankee’ names were suspect as signs of disloyalty. Thus Coleman’s Corners became Lowell in 1837, after the Massechutes mill town, a sign of its industrial potential; in the overheated emotionalism of the day, ‘Lowell’ was too inflammatory, so it was quickly rescinded in favour of the prosaic Lyn, with its English connotations of a waterfall of pool.

There  was a whole sale purging of the old names by the post office starting in the 1850s- think how many ‘Corners’ there must have been in Ontario – which imposed names like Spring Valley that had little relationship to the inhabitants.

Elizabethtown was the eighth and last of the Royal Townships laid out in 1783-83 along the St. Lawrence River, from the Quebec Border to the Thousand Islands. Elizabethtown is the old heartland of Eastern Ontario.

About 1850 something happened. The pioneer slash and burn agriculture had been replaced by a monoculture wheat crop, simply because England needed Canadian wheat during the Napoleonic Wars. Several times after 1790 the wheat crop was virtually wiped out by a wheat midge. “It was brought to the United States in 1779 in bales of hay for the horses of Hessian soldiers brought from Europe to assist the British in the Revolutionary War. Travelling about 10 to 12 miles a year the insects reached Cornwall about 1840 and by 1842 were at Prescott and Brockville taking a toll of wheat crops” In 1843, 200,000 bushels of wheat were exported from Brockville; this dropped to 40,000 in 1844.

The collapse of the wheat economy coincided with the drop in the water table in Elizabethtown, caused by the ‘land butchers’ who cut down all the trees.

About 1850 Elizabethtown went to sleep, like an old soldier dreaming of past glories. “We left everything as it was,” the lady in Forthtown said pointing to the old calendar. It was a long sleep that lasted a hundred years. This is not to say that nothing happened, that time stood still and things fell apart. By all accounts, life was sweet in Elizabethtown. Families grew large, grew small. Farms passed from father to son, husband to widow uncle to nephew in preordained fashion. Local industries, cheese factories, tanneries and blacksmiths came and went, like the railway. “It was a very pleasant spot to be brought up in,” remembered Walter Kilborn Billings in his childhood reminiscences How Dear to My Heart. Most of the older houses in Elizabethtown were constructed between 1820 and 1850, which makes it a treasure trove of historic Ontario architecture, but relatively few after 1850. Elizabethtown became a quiet rural township, with a sophisticated urban fringe along the St. Lawrence – the summer cottage people – and log shanties and privies along the back roads.

Excerpts from the book “Elizabethtown: The Last of the Royal Townships” by Alvin Austin pub June, 2009

Map of Elizabethtown
Elizabethtown Township

 

 

 

 

 

Yonge Mills – a One Room School House in Elizabethtown

Yonge Mills School

School Section #28 Elizbethtown

 School Section # 2 & 3 Front of Yonge

 

The Yonge Mills School house is located on the Yonge Mills Road, approximately 3 ½ miles west of the village of Lyn.  On September 26th 1874 a ¾ acre lot was severed from the land owned by Mr. Griffin and Mr. Phillips and transferred to the Trustees of the Public School Section. The school opened in 1874 and was in use until its closure in 1968. The school was built from stone and similar to others built around the same time period.

In 1954/55 a wall was erected across the room so that the lower level students could be taught by a second teacher. In 1960 a well was dug and a furnace room added. Prior to 1960 the school was without running water and each day a student had to carry a bucket of water from Gardiner’s across the road to the school. The lavatory was divided with the teacher’s in the centre and two on either side for the boys and girls.

The first school in Yonge Mills was a wooden structure located on the corner of Devil’s Door Road and County Road 27, opposite Yonge Mills Church. The second school was a brick structure which held classes from 1859 to 1874. The third school was a stone structure built in 1874 and was open until June 1968.

In 1956 the enrolment of the school was over 50 pupils. [1]

This was a split school between Elizabethtown and Front of Yonge, students from both townships attended and costs were shared.

The school has been turned into a home and is located at 65 Yonge Mills Rd.

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: No Report

1854: No Report

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

that $36 dollars of Clergy money be divided amongst the School Sections of this Township in the following manner, namely Sections No 1 $10, No 12 $5, No 26 $9, No 27 $9.31 cents, No 28 $5, No 29 $2, No 30 $5, No 31 $6 bring union section all the full Sections will leave the sum of $13.11 cents each and the Clerk ? the sum to be paid to the Trustees of each School Section[2]

[2] Lyn Museum Archives

[1] A brief history of Yonge Mills School by Joe Moore 1997

 

Yonge Mills School in Winter SF10#4
Yonge Mills School

 

 

Yonge Mills Class abt 1906 SF10#15
Class abt 1906

 

 

Yonge Mills School Class or 1923 SF10#3
Class of 1923
Yonge Mills Class of 1928 SF10#1
Class of 1928
Yonge Mills School Class 1917 SF10#16
Class of 1917

 

 

 

Tincap – A One Room School House in Elizabethtown

Tin Cap School

(Sectional School #9)

 

The unique name of Tincap was given to the community by some early settlers because the old stone schoolhouse boasted a cupola with a tin cap and as this was the only building of note, Tincap seemed a very suggestive name.

The school was burned about 1894, and classes were then held for a short time in a stone house owned by Mr. M. O’Donnell.

A new frame building was built; it was equipped with a tin cap and bell, to keep this school linked to the original. The first teacher in the new school was Miss Susie Hanna of Lyn.

The Tin Cap- “Another more fanciful version is that Breakenridge furnished the militia with ‘tin caps’ during the war of 1812 and placed one on the school cupola, which sparkled in the sun and could be seen for miles. The log schoolhouse was replaced by stone in 1850, which burned in 1894”[1]

The building no longer exists.

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Stone building, constructed in 1844, condition: Good

1854: Frame building first opened in 1800

[1] Elizabethtown: The last Royal Township by Alvyn Austin pub 2009

 

Tincap School abt 1905 SF13#17
Tincap School Class c1905
Tincap School SF13#1
Tincap School
Tincap School c1935 SF13#15
Tincap School Class c1935
Tincap School Class 1953 SF13#11
Tincap School Class 1953
Tincap School SF13#2
Tincap School

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spring Valley – A One Room School House in Elizabethtown

Spring Valley School 

(School Section #11)

spring-valley-school-1861-62-map
Location of School on a map of 1861-62

 

Spring Valley School was first located at the corner of W.E. Stewart’s field to the left of Ruben Davis’ driveway. The original school was an unpainted frame building that got so old, it could no longer be kept warm in winter. In 1878 the present school was completed further down the road and opened in September of that year. The foundation for this school was laid in 1877. The land was donated by Frank McCrae on condition that the building be used for both school and church purposes. The first contract to build the new school was not completed and later Harvey Hayes took the contract and hired James Davidson to do the work. Miss Jennie Grant was the first teacher in 1878. The first gathering in the school was a church service on Sunday conducted by Rev. Mr. Blair who was the Pastor of the Lyn Circuit. The enrolment of the school in  1902 was 27 pupils and in 1950 was 18 pupils. (The original name of Spring Valley was Niblock’s Corners)

The school had its last class on June 29, 1965, after which students were bussed to the new school at New Dublin.

The building is now the New Dublin Library and Town hall located at 4103 County Road 29

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Stone building, 22×28 in size, constructed in 1843, condition: Not Good

1854: Frame building first opened in 1816

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

That the sum of 20 pounds clear of all expenses be levied and collected on the rateable property of school section No 11.- 1862
Tax levies for School section No 11- 1862[1]

[1] Lyn Museum Archives

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spring Valley School SF1#1
Spring Valley School

 

 

Spring Valley Sch June 1919 Darling Bk36P51
June 1919
Spring Valley Class Photo SF1#8
Class Photo- no date
Spring Valley Class photo 1919 SF1#4a
Class of 1919
Spring Valley Calss Photo c1937 SF1#11
Class c1937
Spring Valley Class Photo 1920 SF1#10
Class Photo 1920

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sherwood Springs – A One Room School House in Elizabethtown

Sherwood Springs School

School Sectional #3 Elizabethtown

 School Sectional # 1 Front of Yonge

 

The first school building was made of logs and located on the west side of Sherwood Springs Road, near the site of Jim Eligh’s brick house. It was started in 1851, but not opened until January 3, 1854. The second school structure was a framed building built on the north side of Hwy 2 across from where Sherwood Springs Rd. now meets Hwy #2. This building was purchased by Fred Latham and moved down to the opposite side of the road and a second story was added.[2]

The third school was located on Hwy #2, where Woodland Park Zoo was built after the school closed. The school, built in 1907, was closed in 1956 with an enrolment of 20 students.

As a shared school between Elizabethtown and Front of Yonge Townships, students from both townships used the school and costs were shared between the townships.

The building still exists and is located at 1764 Highway #2 west.

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Stone building, 30×36 in size, constructed in 1844, condition: Good

1854: report combined with SS#5

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

That the union of School sections no 3 & 5 be dissolved and that all resolutions uniting the same be rendered the same as if said divisions ere never united at the request of a public meeting held for that purpose signed by Henry Clow, Chairman- 1858
Annual school meeting of School Section No 3 of the freeholders and householders of said section, acceptance of financial report; that we have a free school this year; that Wm Clow & Mr.S.Fulford be auditors for the ensuing year; that one chord of wood be delivered at the school house and cut by each scholar that the teacher measure the wood and if it falls short that the person who brought it shall bring another chord; that the persons who send children to school shall board the teacher- 1862
That the petition of the trustees of School Section No 3 be complied with and that the sum of $140. clear of expenses be levied and collected on the rateable property of said school section for school purposes for the currant year 1865
that the Clerk be instructed to prepare a Bylaw to unite School Sections No.3 and No.5 into one section agreeable to the request of the rate payers of said sections- 1869
that the application of the Trustees of School section No.3 be complied with and the sum of $18 be levied and collected on the rateable property of said section exclusive of expenses – 1869
that the Trustees of School Section No 3 be paid the sum of $240 the amount levied on said section for School purposes and the Clerk order the said amount to be paid to William Wilson-1873[1]

[1] Lyn Museum Archives

[2] Education in Front of Yonge 1784-2000 by Sandra Wells 2008

Sherwood Springs School c1920 SF8#1
Sherwood Springs School c1920

 

 

 

Sherwood Springs School SF8#6
Sherwood Springs School no date
Sherwood Springs School SF8#
School Class no date
Sherwood Springs School 1953 Teacher Mrs. Roseberry SF8#2
Class of 1953 teacher Mrs.Roseberry
Sherwood Springs School c1935 SF8
Class c1935
Sherwood Springd School Last Class 1957 SF8#
Last Class at the school 1957
Sherwood Springs Class of 1942 SF8#
Class of 1924

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seeley’s – A One Room School House in Elizabethtown

Seeley’s School

(School Section #10)

seeleys-chool-1861-62-mao
Location of School on a map from 1861-62

 

The original school building made of stone, was built in 1849. The second building, built of brick in 1889, burned one cold winter’s day on January  26, 1957.

The growth of the settlement at Seeley’s necessitated the building of a school. In 1849 one was built on the corner of Sawmill Road and that leading to Leetuck, or Lee Road on the farm of Thomas Booth. This location was on the 6 acres purchased by Alexander Stewart. In 1889 the school became crowded and John W. Stewart, rather than have the new one so near his own dwellings, gave another lot and drew the bricks from one lot to the other. The first teacher of the new school was Homer Moore. On Sunday January 26, 1957 the building was destroyed by fire. Only the bell in the belfry and one baseball bat in the basement were saved. Seeley’s School was built across from North Star Farms at Seeley’s Corners.

The last teacher was Mrs. Allan Stewart and she and her twenty pupils were transported to the Old Lyn Public School. Starting the following September, 1957, the pupils went to the new Lyn School, then to the New Dublin School. (Mrs. Allan Stewart 1967) [1]

A teacher’s yearly salary in 1862 was sixty dollars.

The original building was probably a one room log building.

“Old School Victim of Sunday Fire. A venerable brick building built in 1889 was complete. It was destroyed by fire of unknown origins. The school had a capacity for 33 pupils; however at the end it had 20 students. Mrs. Alvin Gardiner, residing nearby spotted the fire about 1:10 pm. Brockville Fire Department was called, but before the men could receive permission to make the trip, a second call was received stating that nothing could be done to save the building. There was no water supply and the nearby creek was frozen solid. The school was a sturdy building that served the community well during the past 68 years. The building was about 40 feet long and 30 feet wide. It had been the means of education for generations of district youngsters. The current students would be bussed by Stewart’s bus lines to the Lyn School.” [2]

The building no longer exists.

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Frame building, constructed in 1810, condition: Not Good

1854: Stone building first opened in 1809

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

that the application of the Trustees of School Section No 10 be complied with and the sum of Two Hundred Dollars be levied and collected on the assessed Taxable Property of said section exclusive of expenses for School Purposes[3]

[3] Lyn Museum Archives

[2] Women’s Institute History Book 3 page 174

[1] The Recorder and Times Jan 1957

 

Seeleys Sch Oppening Day 1898 SF12#15 (1)
Seeley’s School Opening Day 1898

 

 

 

Seeley's School WI bk4p328
Seeley’s School

 

Seeleys Sch Teacher Mary Bissell 1916 SF12#18
Miss Mary Bissell teacher 1916
Seeleys Sch SF12#1
Seeley’s School no date

 

Seeleys Sch Doing the garden 1927 SF12#8
Doing the Garden 1927
Seeley's School SF12#25
Class- no date
Seeleys Sch Class abt 1925 SF12#18
Class abt 1925
Seeleys Sch Arbor Day c1924 SF12#22
Arbor Day c1924

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seeley's Sch Halloween Party Oct 1935 SF12#26
Hallowe’en Party Oct 1935

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rock School – A One Room School House in Elizabethtown

Rock School

School Section Number Unknown

rock-school-1861-62-map
Location of school on a map from 1861-62

The new Rock School was built in 1937. The school was built of native granite, quarried a few yards from the school. This new school is located on Hwy #2 west of Brockville, and west of Oakland Cemetery. It was regarded as a model rural public school with accommodations for over 30 pupils, indoor toilets, two cloak rooms, a teacher’s room, store room and a basement playroom.

The original Rock School was built in 1844, and stood to the west of the present site. Prior to this stone school an earlier log school stood on the bank of Grant’s Creek further east of the present location.

This school has been turned into a home and is located at 1405 McDonald Rd.

 

Rock School cLate 1800s SF5#9
Rock School House late 1800’s

 

Rock School Hwy 2 1891 PAB6F4#4
Class of 1891
Rock School c1912 SF5#10
Class of 1912
Rock School c1895 SF5#11
Class abt 1895
Rock School Class abt 1920 SF (2)
Class abt 1920
Rock School 1930 SF5#12
Class of 1930

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rock School SF5#31
New School Building built in 1937
Rock School Maypole Dance c1940's SF5#21
Maypole Dance c1940

New Dublin – A One Room School House in Elizabethtown

New Dublin School

(School Section #15)

new-dublin-school-1861-62-map
Location of school on a map from 1861-62

 

The first school was built near Lamb’s Pond, almost across the road from the Ernest Kendrick farm, later owned by Donald Stewart. Later a school was built on the Horton Farm near the present school. No dates are know for the erection of either of these buildings. The second school was torn down and while the third school was being built pupils attended classes in the first Orange Hall, a frame building between the present school and the Methodist Church. The third New Dublin School was built in 1880.

Annie Scott, who taught in 1894, received $310. per year. [1]

The school has been turned into a home and is located at 7406 Seventh Concession Rd.

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Log building, 20×24 in size, constructed in 1837, condition: Good

1854: Stone building first opened in 1813

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1872

 

That the sum of 21.50 pounds clear of all expenses be levied and collected on the rateable property of school section No 15.- 1862
that the application of the Trustees of School Section No 15 be complied with and the sum of $30 be levied and collected on the assessed taxable property of said School Section for School Purposes exclusive of expenses for the year 1869
that the application of the Trustees of School section No 15 be complied with and the sum of $115 be levied and collected on the assessed taxable property of said section exclusive of expenses for school purposes- 1871
that the application of the Trustees of School Section No 15 be complied with and the sum of $155 be levied and collected on the assessed taxable property of said Section exclusive of all expenses for the year 1872

[1] Recorder & Times May 1965

 

New Dublin School photo- New Dublin Scrapbook
New Dublin School

 

 

 

 

New Dublin School 1917- New Dublin Scrapbook (1)
Class of 1917
New Dublin School SS15 - New Dublin Scrapbook (2)
New Dublin School Class no date
New Dublin School 1896- New Dublin Scrapbook
Class of 1896

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Dublin School- photo by Hans-Ulrich Raffelt taken April 2017

 

Lyn – Elizabethtown’s Largest School

Lyn School  

(School Section #7)

 

The first school house was located in the centre of the village by the creek. It was abandoned for a newer one room brick school at the west end of the Village, across from the present building. It was in use until 1867 when it burned down. The growth of the village led to a new two story, four room stone school house being built across from the one room brick structure.

The stone schoolhouse in Lyn was built in 1867 and served the children of the district until 1959/1960.  “The classrooms were on the ground floor and the second floor boasted a small stage so that concerts and plays could take place. Parties and dances were held there too”[1]

The Public School in Lyn was built in the year 1867. Although the first annual meeting of the school, on record, took place in 1876 there was undoubtedly meetings before that, as an entry in the old minute and account book shows that John Halliday was the Sect-Treasurer in 1871.  The first annual meeting of School Section No 7 was held in the school hall Wed, Jan 12, 1876 at 10 o’clock. Mr. Norman Coleman was appointed chairman and R.S.Hudson Sect. The school has to date had 60 teachers. The first school fair was held about 1914 on the old “Tan Bark Flats” with entries of cooking, vegetables, fancy work and collections of butterflies and insects. (Suzanne Coke, 1944) [2]

The “New” Lyn School opened its doors to 185 pupils on September 4, 1956. It was planned by architect Mr.Prus and built by contractor Mr.J.Saunders of Prescott for the cost of $92,000.  Miss. Anna Hudson was the prince[al of this new school. As the enrolment of the school increased with the closing of the Howard and Halleck’s School, it was found necessary to add four more room sto the original six room building. The addition was completed and ready for use in September 1963. The enrolment then was 263 pupils. Still the number increased and by 1965 all those pupils residing on the Howard Road were transferred to the Tincap School. In June 1965 the enrolment was 295. On June 29th, 1967 Miss Anna Hudson retired as Principal , Mr.J.Tallmire of Brockville became the new principal. (Anna Hudson, 1967) [3]

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: no report only: condition: Good

1854: Brick building, first opened in 1850

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1872

that the trustees of Lyn School Section No 7 be paid the amount due said section on account of debentures and the clerk order the same to be paid- 1871[4]

 

[1] Lyn 1784-1984 by Mary G.Robb

[2] Women’s Institute History Book 3 page 159

[3] Women’s Institute History Book 3 Pg 167

[4] Lyn Museum Archives

 

 

 

Lyn School SF2#3 (2)
Lyn School, notice the turn style at the gate to keep the cows out

 

Lyn School Cass 1920 - WI Bk 6 P85 (1)
Class of 1920
Lyn School 1931 Jr. Smith SF3#32
1931 and Jr.Smith at the back of the school

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lyn School 1916 SF2#15
Class of 1916

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lyn School Fair Parade c1918 SF2#8a
School Fair Parade c1918
First School Fair Sep 21 1915 on the tan bark WI bk4p319
1st School Fair held on the Tan Bark below the village Sep 21, 1915
Lyn School Play - Milk Maid c1900 SF2#30
School Play- ‘Milk Maids’ c1900
Lyn School Halloween Concert 1929 SF2#11
Hallowe’en Concert 1929

 

The Athens Reporter and County of Leeds Advertiser

Lyn School (S.S.#7) Elizabethtown

Tuesday Aug 13, 1895 issue

Lyn, Monday Aug. 12 –

Our school board are over-hauling the school house and putting things in good shape – new seats, draining the basement, and putting in furnace for heating etc. The two school rooms are to be on the upper flat, leaving the lower room to be used as a town hall for the present.

The union S.S. excursion takes place next week to Gananoque.

 

Tuesday Aug 27, 1895 issue

Lyn– Monday Aug 28 –

The union S.S. excursion came off on Friday, 23rd, and was a very pleasant affair

School has opened and both scholars and teachers are much pleased with their new quarters

 

Lillie’s – A One Room School House in Elizabethtown

Lillie’s School

(S.S. No. 12 Elizabethtown S.S.No. 9 Front of Yonge)

lillies-school-1861-62-map
Location of school on a map from 1861-62

 

Lillie’s School was located at Lillie’s about five miles from Lyn on the Graham Lake Road. The original school was built of wood and located on the west corner of Hendry Road a quarter of a mile west of the new school. The wooden structure blew down in a wind storm. It was replaced by one made of brick in 1880. This school was 40 feet long by 30 feet wide and could accommodate 35 students. The new brick school was used up until school consolidation in the 1960’s. The school was closed in June 1963, and was demolished in 1988.[1]

The school also served as a church and services were held there every two weeks on a Monday evening by Methodists Ministers from Lyn. One the first graduates of Lillie’s School was John Booth who became a provincial land surveyor and helped to survey the counties of Leeds and Grenville.

Lillie’s was a shared school between Elizabethtown and Front of Yonge Townships. This means that students from both areas used the school and costs were split between the two townships.

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Stone Building, size 26×36, construction date 1845, condition: Poor

1854: Stone building, first opened in 1842

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1872

That $36 dollars of Clergy money be divided amongst the School Sections of this Township in the following manner, namely Sections No 1 $10, No 12 $5, No 26 $9, No 27 $9.31 cents, No 28 $5, No 29 $2, No 30 $5, No 31 $6 bring union section all the full Sections will leave the sum of $13.11 cents each and the Clerk ? the sum to be paid to the Trustees of each School Section – 1873[2]

[1] Focus on the District by Harry Painting February 1980

[2] Lyn Museum Archives

 

Lillies School SF7#2
Lillie’s School no date

 

Lillies School 1902 SF7#1
School Class of 1902
Lillies School Class of 1914 Darling Bk36P12
School Class of 1914
Lillies School 1917 Teacher Mandy Tait SF7#5
Class of 1917- teacher Mandy Tait
Lillies School Class of 1917 Darling Bk36P14
Class of 1917
Lillies School Class of 1940 Darling Bk36P24
Class of 1940
Lillies School Class of 1911 Darling Bk36P10
Class of 1911
Lillies School 1951 SF7#22
Class of 1951

 

 

Howard – A One Room School House in Elizabethtown

Howard School

(School Section #6)

howard-school-1861-62-map
Location of school map of 1861-62

 

On the 12th Day of October 1861, a parcel of land was purchased on which to build the Howard School.  The indenture was between Andrew Donaldson and his wife Eliza and the School Section number 6 in the township of Elizabethtown, for a sum of sixty dollars. The parcel of land was described on the indenture as a part of the rear of the east half of Lot number twenty three in the Second Concession in the Township of Elizabethtown. In 1946 a well and pump were installed.[1]

 

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: no information except: condition: Not Good

1854: Frame building, first opened in 1850

 

This school has been turned into a home and is located at 3439 Centennial Rd. (County Rd 27)

[1] Board of Trustees Annual report for 1946

 

Howard School WI bk3p172
Howard School, no date

 

 

Howard School Class 1953 SF9#1
Class of 1953

 

Howard School Students 1929 SF9#14
Students from 1929
Howard School Class c1947 SF9#4
Class c1947
Howard School L-r Jean Hudson Hill, Helen Hudson Davison; unk Digital Hudson.tif
Girls in their finest clothes
Howard School SF9#12
Class photo, date unknown

Halleck’s – A One Room School House in Elizabethtown

Halleck’s School 

(School Section #5)

hallecks-school-1861-62-map
Location of school from map of 1861-62

 

On June 28, 1963 the school rang its’ bell for the last time. The teacher at the time was Mrs. Marion Ross, and she was the last person to teach at the little brick school house located on the Halleck’s Road. The 27 remaining pupils from this school were transferred to the Lyn Public School. About 10 years prior there were 34 pupils in the school

The original school was a log school house located in the north corner of the Hallecks Road and No. 2 Highway. Rev. William Hallock built a school before 1810 which had a ready made class: with 16 Coles, 13 Clows, 10 or 12 Fulfords and his own six children. The brick school house was built further north on the Halleck’s Road around 1839. The land on which the present school was built was donated by Mr. Caleb Halloch (Squire Halloch) on May 12, 1838 and was built by Archibald Davidson, a stone mason.

The school was replaced by the present building in 1935, a trim neo-classical brick Edifice.[2] A well was drilled for the new school in the 1930’s and toilets were installed around 1939. In the early 1940’s electricity was installed. Between 1886 and 1900 teachers salaries’ were from $220. to $300 per year.

Heritage Elizabethtown erected a plaque near the original school recalling an incident that took place during the War of 1812. The plaque reads as follows:

Hallock’s School and the ‘Underhill Incident’

“A one room school near here was the site of an international incident before the war of 1812. William Hallock (1770-1836), a Methodist preacher, established the school in a log cabin on his property. In 1809 the teacher was Isaac Underhill, an alleged American army deserter. On May 1, three American soldiers disembarked from a schooner on the St. Lawrence, seized Underhill at the school and dragged him, bound and gagged towards the river. When Underhill broke free and ran, his captors shot him from behind. They then fled to their boat with armed settlers in pursuit. Underhill died the next day. His murder was a flagrant violation of British sovereignty which outraged Canadians and lingered long on local memory” (Issac Underhill is said to be buried in an unmarked grave in the Fulford Cemetery)

The old school was converted into a home and is located at 2301 Hallecks Rd.N.

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Frame Building, size 24×34, construction date 1811, condition: Not Good

1854: Frame building, first opened in 1817 (this report combines SS #3 and 5)

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1872

 

That the union of School sections no 3 & 5 be dissolved and that all resolutions uniting the same be rendered the same as if said divisions ere never united at the request of a public meeting held for that purpose signed by Henry Clow, Chairman- 1858
that the Clerk be instructed to prepare a Bylaw to unite School Sections No.3 and No.5 into one section agreeable to the request of the rate payers of said sections- 1869
that the application of the Trustees of School Section No 5 be complied with and the sum of $200 be levied and collected on the Taxable property of said section exclusive of expenses -1872[1]

[1] Lyn Museum Archives

[2] Elizabethtown: The Last of the Royal Townships by Alvyn Austin pub. 2009

Halleck's School SF6#11
Halleck’s School

 

Halleck's School Class of 1896 SF6#13
Class of 1896

 

 

 

Halleck's School Fair 1937-38 Teacher Anna Hudson SF6#18
1937-38 School Fair, Anna Hudson teacher
Halleck's School Fair SF6#1
School Fair
Halleck's School 1938-1939 SF6#5a
Class of 1938-39

 

 

 

Greenbush – a One Room School House in Elizabethtown

Greenbush School

 (School Section No. 20)

 

The first school in Greenbush was built of logs in 1835 on land donated by James Haskin. It burned in 1845 after only ten years of use. The second school, made of stone, was constructed on the same site in 1848. It was twice as large as the first. However it was torn down in 1918 in order to build a larger school. Construction of the brick building was completed within six months, In 1905 the school grounds were enlarged, trees were planted and a fence erected. The land for the extension was purchased from Thomas Webster.

While construction was underway in 1918 classes were held in the United Church Hall. Between 1845 and 1848 classes were held above the store at Millhouse and in one of William Olds’ houses.

The first teacher on record is Miss. Sarah Taggart in 1840. She was followed by Miss. Lucinda Keller who received $5. per month.

The school was phased out of the school system in 1965. [1]

The old school was converted into a home and is located at 9366 Addison-Greenbush Road.

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Log Building, size 26×24, construction date 1830, condition Good

1854: Brick building, first opened in 1849

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

That Edward Davis be detached from school section no 18 and be attached to school section no 20-1858[2]

[1] Greenbush and Addison Villages a look at the history and homes by Karen Clout BA pub 1994

[2] Lyn Museum Archives

Greenbush school 1941 1

1- Greenbush School taken in 1941

 

Greenbush School 1941 Class- Mack Digital (3)
4-School Photo 1941

 

Greenbush School 1942 Entrance Class Mack Digital
2-1942 Entrance Class, Miss Lillian Pelton teacher

 

 

 

Greenbush School 1941 Class- Mack Digital (1)
3-Class photo taken in 1941

 

 

Greenbush School 1941 Haloween Mack Digital (2)
5-Halowe’en Party 1941

 

 

6-Greenbush School Class of 1921
Student’s Names for the Class of 1921

 

Greenbush School photo by Hans-Ulrich Raffelt , taken April 2017

 

 

Glen Buell – A One Room School House in Elizabethtown

Glen Buell School

(School Section # 16)

glen-buell-1861-62-map
Location of School – Map 1861-62

 

“Peter Booth’ School 1842

Dr. John G.Booth’s eldest son was Peter Booth, born at the farm in 1825. In 1842 at the age of 17, he started teaching at the log school in Glen Buell. He had 63 children, ranging in age from 4 to 17, and received the magnificent salary of 2.5 pounds per month. Peter Booth died in 1860, of tuberculosis, leaving a wife and three young children. In 1842, and enthusiastic young buck, he wrote his first report to the district council:

I beg leave to submit the enclosed report of the Common School at present under my instruction. The school house in which this school is taught is on the rear of Lot 31, in the 6th Concession of Elizabethtown on the Main Road leading from Brockville to Farmersville.

All the pupils that have attended resided within two miles of the school house and there are probably from 16 to 20 children more living within that distance from the schoolhouse between the ages of 5 and 16 whose names are not on this report as they have not been in attendance. The school was commenced about the first pf April last, Teachers wages two pounds five shillings per month with the expectation that further aid would be granted from the public monies.” (from Lea Booth, John Booth, p54-55) [1]

The original school was a small log schoolhouse constructed by Eri Hayes in the 1820’s.

The school was closed in the spring of 1965 and pupils bused to either Addison or New Dublin depending on where they lived. Because of overcrowding at New Dublin a few years later, Glen Buell was re-opened for Grade 1 students for a short time.

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Log Building, size 24×24, construction date 1837, condition Good

1854: Frame building, first opened in 1844

 

The following information was extracted from the motion papers of the Elizabethtown Council 1855-1873:

 

That the request of the trustees of School Section No 16 be complied with that the sum of one hundred dollars be levied and collected on the rateable property of said section exclusive of expenses-1869
that the Trustees of School Section No 16 be paid the sum of $1 as non-collected school tax an that Lot 34 in the Seventh Concession of Elizabethtown and the Clerk order the sum to be paid to Boyd Hall-1870[2]

[1] The History of Elizabethtown Township, by Alvyn Austin unpublished 2002

[2] Lyn Museum Archives

 

 

Glen Buell One Room Schoolhouse
Glen Buell Schoolhouse

The Athens Reporter and County of Leeds Advertiser

Tuesday March 12, 1895 issue

Glen Buell School (Elizabethtown SS #16) Monthly Report

Sr. IV. – Stella Orton 1166, Gertie Sturgeon 1128, Charlie Towriss 1128, Carrie Davis 1084, Ernest Sturgeon 959, Allen LaPointe 947, Roy Westlake 912, Archie Stewart 735, Ira Moore* 600, Nelson Boulton*600

Jr. IV.- Freddie Percival 694, Delbert Westlake 609, Flora Whaley 584, Leonard Orton 580, John Anderson 563, Robbie Perkins 490, Ethel Mott* 450

Sr. III – Blanche Howe 560, Nellie Montgomery 490, Ada La Pointe 455

Jr. III. – Odiel LaPointe 600, Herbie Sturgeon 595, Levi Howe 555, Ethel Dack 520, Arthur Hayes 515, Clifford Mott 50, Frank LaPointe 490, Russell Sturbeon 485

  1. – Lillie LaPointe 425, Delbert Dack 400, Joe Anderson 400, Violet Westlake 400, Roy Earls 375

Sr. Pt. II.- Freddie Westlake 450, Clement Sturgeon 445, Amelia Perkins 435, Lewis Westlake 420

Jr. Pt. II. – Chloe Sturgeon 450, Leonard Anderson 425, Stella Anderson 425, David Lee 400, Mamie Dancy 400, Gordie Mott 400, Stanley Hayes 390, Nellie Dancy 390

  1. – Clinton Stewart, Byron Westlake, Henry Lee, Jona Westlake

These marked thus * were absent during some of the examinations.

The marks given are for punctuality, conduct and lessons.

Average attendance for Feb., 42

Anna Scott, Teacher

 

Glen Buell (S.S.#16) Elizabethtown

Tuesday Sep 10, 1895 issue

The library in connection with Glen Buell S.S. has been catalogued alphabetically and copies of the list are being printed this week. The books enumerated number 168 and while chiefly devoted to church work, many of them are of the general interest, and all are good wholesome literature, the dissemination of which would prove beneficial to any community.

 

Tuesday Nov 12, 1895 issue

Glen Buell School Report

Fifth Class – Stella Orton 833, Ira Moore 499

Senior Fourth –  Carrie Davis 710, Charlie Towriss 524, Gertie Sturgeon 456, Roy Westlake 211

Junior Forth –  Freddie Percival 626, Blanch Howe 527, Leonard Orton 489, Ada LaPoint 328, Ella Davis 301, Herbie Sturgeon 294, Edith Moorhouse 185, Ethel Dack 167, John Anderson 100, Delbert Westlake 100, Clifford Mott.

Third Class –  Russel Sturgeon 80, Odiel LaPoint 60, Frank LaPoint 25, Levi Howe, Arthur Hayes.

Senior Second –  Violet Westlake 130, Lillie LaPoint 95, Delbert DAck 90, Joe Anderson 10.

Junior Second – Ethel Andress 175, Chloe Sturgeon 135, Clement Sturgeon 110, Stella Anderson 85, Lewis Westlake 75, Amelia Perkins 25, Fred Westlake 10.

Sr. Part Second –  Gordie Mott 90, Leonard Anderson 50, Harold Moorhouse 40 Stanley Hayes 30, Mamie Dancy, Nellie Dancy.

Jr. Part Second. – Florence Percival 80, Byron Westlake 50.

Sr. First –  May Sturgeon 80, Jonah Westlake 65, Wilfred Sturgeon 10.

Junior First – Wesley Dack 690. James Anderson 30.

A number of pupils were absent during examinations on account of sickness

The marks awarded are for punctuality, conduct and lessons.

Average attendance for October 41 7-11

Anna Scott, Teacher

Fairfield East a One Room Schoolhouse in Elizabethtown

Fairfield East

School School Section No. 8

fairfield-east-school-1861-62-map
Location of School- Map 1861-62

The first school was a log cabin built on the west corner of the farm owned by McDougall’s. Johnathan Barr was the teacher and was noted for his stern and strict qualities. When the community became more settled it was found that the school was not central nor adequate enough so a second school was built about a mile and half farther west. This one also passed into history with the erection of a third, which was built a few rods [sic] east again and which is most up to date.[1]

About 1865 a wooden frame school was built west of the McDougall farm and around 1900 the third Fairfield East School was erected. The school was phased out during the school consolidation of the 1960’s. (R&T Darling Collection Bk3)

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Frame Building, size 20×24, no construction date, condition Good

1854: Log building, first opened in 1808

[1] The Recorder & Times Apr 11, 1927 “ Fairfield and its Pioneers by Mrs. H.E.Pyke

If anyone has any photos or additional regarding this school, we would appreciate hearing from you.

 

Walking Tour of Lyn

 Cedar Lawn (18 Perth St.)Cedar Lawn, Perth St, Ltn (3)

 It is built of brick, unusual in Elizabethtown, with stone quoins defining the corners and semi circular windows in the attic. It was built in two stages: the main house in the 1840’s and two large wings added in the 1860’s. The house today has been restored and looks much like it did in the late 1800’s.

 

 

Lyn Presbyterian Church (12 Perth St.)

 

The Presbyterians Presbyterial Church c1900 WB5 Methodist (2)commenced holding services at Lyn, about the year 1811. The present church was erected in 1872. It is built of stone, the style of architecture being Gothic. The cost was about $5,000. The sittings number 200, and the society includes the congregation at Caintown, as well as Lyn.(1) Many years ago the church was transferred to the Methodists and today is known as Christ United Church.

(1) Leavitts Hstory of Leeds and Grenville pub 1879

 

 Willson House Hotel (1 Perth St.)

 Willson’s hotel was one of several hotels that served the various business travellersWilson Hotel WB2

who passed through Lyn in the mid to late 1800’s. The house still exists at 1 Perth St., however the front porch has been removed making the structure look much smaller. The top floor windows and roof peaks still give the look of the original hotel.

 

 

St.John the Baptist Anglican Church. (37 Main St. W)

Through the efforts of the late James Coleman, assisted by a few other churchmen, funds were secured for the organization of an English Church at Lyn. The erection of the present church was commenced in 1860, with Bishop Lewis, then Rector of Brockville, taking the deepest interest in the undertaking, the good work being continued by the Rev. JohnSt John Baptist Lyn 1962 WB5 (2) Strange, Rev. R.L.Jones, and the present Rector, the Rev. Henry Austin. The building is of stone, Gothic style of architecture, and contains about 300 sittings.  (Leavitts History of Leeds and Grenville pub 1879)

 

 

 

 

Lyn Cemetery (37 Main St. W)

 Lyn Cemetery is one of Ontario’s oldest continuously used cemeteries. It was dedicated sometime Lyn Cemetery WB2around 1790. The Cemetery is situated behind the Anglican Church on the ledge of a gently rolling ridge overlooking a picturesque glen. Above and around this are the granite outcroppings left exposed by the last Ice Age as part of the Pre-Cambrian Shield. (Lyn 1784-1984 by Mary Robb)

 

 

 

The Coleman Hotel (5&7 Main St. E)

 Located across from the pump at Main and Perth Streets, construction was started in 1811 and finished in 1812. It was used by commuters oColeman Hotel 1928 WB6 Streetsn the B&W R.R. Charlie Lewis built the front porch from used cedar from a caboose. The stone part of the house (the back addition), was used as a kitchen. The stable, now gone, had a hired hands’ quarter for people arriving by horse which was included in their lodging as well as their meal. Known as the oldest building in Lyn built in 1814.

 

St. John’s Hall (11 Main St. W)

 This was the church hall for St. John’s Anglican Church. It had hardwood floors and was the location for local dinners and dances.St John's Hall WB1

 

 

 

 

 

Stewart’s Garage (19 Main St. W)

 Jock and John Stewart ran a garage and gas station out of this building for many years. They also ran Stewart’s Bus Lines, providing local transportStewart's Garage WB5 Methodist (2)ation to and from Brockville, School Bus Services and operated Tour Buses. In 1999 this building was renovated and is now the home to Heritage Place Museum.


 

 

 

Lyn By-Wash (Across from 19 Main St W)

The original mill was located to the right (east) of the water fall. The small dam backed up the Lyn Pond and supplied water to the small mill. The dam was later blown up and the Lyn pond was drained.When the large grist mill was built below the village this dam and waterfall continued to supply power to Main St Lyn WB4 Pond #24several industries located across Main Street including the Last Factory and Saw Mill.


 

 

 

 

 The Blacksmiths Shop ( 30 Main St. W)

 The end of the 19th century and the first half of the 20th century saw the development of the country blacksmith’s role. At that time, there was an average of one blacksmith for every 100 families, 3-5 blacksmiths per village. The blacksmith enabled the communBlacksmith Shop c1900 WB1ity to save money. Inhabitants paid a fixed price for the year and could have their horses shod as often as they wished. Clients used a barter system and paid in kind with farm or forest products. Sometimes the blacksmith lent money at interest; sometimes he resold grains, vegetables, meats and other produce that he received in payment.

 

 

 

 Root Manufacturing (31 Main St.W.)

This company made various types of wooden bowls, scoops and measuring cups. Items from tMain St, Root Mfg WB1his company are on display in the Heritage Place Museum. To the east of this building can be seen a concrete wall, which was part of the canal that took water from the Lyn Pond to the main grist mill below the village. There was a drop of 50 feet from here to the mill.

 

 

 

 

 Lyn Public School (School Section #7) (1 Church St.)

The first school house was located in the centre of the village by the creek. It was abandoned for a newer one- room brick school at the west end of the Village, across from the present building. It was in use until 1867 when it burned down. The stone schLyn School WI Bk3 p160ool house (seen here), was built in 1867 and served the children of the district until 1959/1960.  The classrooms were on the ground floor and the second floor boasted a small stage so that concerts and plays could take place. Parties and dances were held there too.

 

 

 

Methodist Church (cor. of Church and Main St W.)

 This church, built of brick, has an area of 60 x 84 feet, with a tower 112 feet square. It was erected in 1857 and is situated on part of Lot No.30 in the 3rd Concession. The original site was a gift from Richard Coleman Sr. The charge includes four congregations: those of Lyn, Caintown, Mallorytown, and Rockfield. The total membership wMethodist Ch Main St WI bk3p136as 300, of whom 80 belonged to the Lyn charge. (Leavitts History of Leeds and Grenville pub 1879)

In the 1980’s this church was reopened as St.Andrew Roman Catholic Church, it has since closed.

 

Addison a One Room School House in Elizabethtown

Addison School

 (School Section No. 21)

There have been four schools in Addison. The first was built of logs and burned. Both the second and third schools[1] in Addison doubled as Episcopal and Methodist Churches. The second school was a stone building which stood beside the third, framed school. This school was moved to Benjamin Scott’s property and used as a horse stable. It was torn down in the early 1950’s. The third school is a frame building which was constructed in the early 1870’s. It continued to be the Addison School until the 1960’s. The building is now privately owned.

In the 1820’s a log school was erected to replace the one room educational centre in the smithy. This building gave way to a stone school which served Addison for 90 years.

Charles O. Stowell, who married the two daughters of John Ketchum, was born in Massechusetts February 17, 1797. Educated in the United States he came to Canada as a young man with a teaching certificate. In 1832 he took a teaching job at the old Addison school about 200 yards south of the old Perth Trail. This pioneer log school was later torn down and the school moved into the Methodist Church. When the Methodists build a new stone church on the other side of the road, now the Addison United Church, the old house of worship became a permanent school. This school served the community for 90 years until it became unfit for school purposes. It ended its days as a stable on the Scott Farm, where it eventually gave way to decay and collapsed.

A wooden frame school replaced the stone structure and in the late 1960’s it was closed. The Addison School was listed as S.S.no. 21

School Superintendents Report (Ontario Archives)

Shows the following information, which in some cases contradicts what we have already researched, and contradicts other filed School Superintendents Reports:

1850: Log building, 20×26 in size, constructed in 1850, condition: Good

1854: Stone building first opened in 1832

[1] Greenbush and Addison Villages a look at the history and homes by Karen Clout BA pub 1994

The building is now privately owned and is located at 9210 Addison-Greenbush Road.

The Athens Reporter and County of Leeds Advertiser

Tuesday May 21, 1895 issue

Addison School House (Elizabethtown SS #21) – The appearance of our school yard has been much improved by the levelling and planting of more trees. Also the windows of the house are adorned with nice plants, all of which will have a beneficial part in the education of the pupils in attendance.

 

Addison, Ontario One room schoolhouse
Addison School House taken in 2016
Addison School 2016 (2)
Addison School House taken in 2016
Addison Class of 1904
Addison Class of 1904

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

addison-school-unk-date-good-photo-digital-from-facebook-5
Class Photo unknown date
addison-school-unk-date-good-photo-digital-from-facebook-2
Class Photo unknown date perhaps in the 1920’s by the styles
addison-school-unk-dates-digital-from-facebook-1
Halloween Party, date unknown
addison-school-unk-date-good-photo-digital-from-facebook
School children, date unknown
addison-school-unk-dates-digital-from-facebook-3
In front of the school, no date, notice the fence and the boy sitting on it is barefoot
addison-school-unk-dates-digital-from-facebook-7
Addison School in the winter, date unknown
addison-school-unk-dates-digital-from-facebook-6
School Photo, date unknown, notice the girl in the front had to laugh !

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

addison-public-school-class-c1935-2
School Class c1935 (Notice the boy in the front row right, just had to blow his nose at the moment the photo was taken)
14329379_10209983402998823_1970106674_o
Addison School c1935, note the turnstile used as a gate
addison-public-school-class-of-1933-2
Addison School Class of 1933
addison-public-school-class-xmas-1935-2
Addison Public School Christmas 1935

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

History of Lyn

 

Lyn was founded in 1784 by Able Coleman who came here from the United States.  They built their first mill in 1786 located on Main Street across from the museum and to the east of the water falls. The first mill burned and was replaced by a second mill in the same location which also burned. After this the five story stone structure you see depicted in the reception area was built south of the village.

During the 1830’s there was a general unrest with the United States and American names. It was then in 1836, that the name of Coleman’s Corners was changed to Lowell. The new name of Lowell only lasted one year, when after realizing there was another Lowell in Ontario, the name was changed in 1838 to Lyn, a Scottish word for waterfall (Linn).
In its heyday, Lyn had more industry and was busier than Brockville. With the introduction of electricity, Lyn unfortunately, slowly lost its manufacturing base and started to decline.

The Origins of the Lyn Heritage Place Museum

In 1997 the street commissioners of the village of Lyn heard that the old Stewart’s Garage on the Main Street was for sale and thought that it would be a good thing for the village to purchase it and fix it up as a museum for area artifacts and meeting rooms. After much researching of this possibility, it was turned down by the Township Council and the idea was dropped at that time.

Stewart's Garage Museum Photos 1 (2)Stewart's Garage Museum Photos 1 (1)The building, about 150 years old, was in very bad shape. Then came the ice storm of 1998 and the roof of the bus garage at the back fell in and the Township was putting pressure on the owner to tear the building down. About fifty pigeons had made their home in the main garage and most of the upper windows were broken.

In the spring of 1999, a Village Trustee talked to the owners of the building, Dale and Ron Howard of Howard Bus Lines, and was offered an exceptional deal on this property for the village.

2. Before renovations-2

This information was brought to the Lyn Days Committee, and everyone agreed that they should check into the possibility of the Lyn Days Committee acquiring the property.

 

The Lyn Days Committee talked to the owners and learned that there was a very involved title to the property to straighten out. The committee decided to acquire the property.

1. Before renovations-1

In early August the committee was assured the property would indeed be transferred. At a meeting in early August 1999 it was decided the property should be registered to a committee of five people in trust for Lyn Days and on August 25th, 1999 the title to the building was transferred to the committee.

 

On August 30th,1999 volunteers started cutting brush and clearing up the junk on the property. They were soon joined by several other volunteers, machines and trucks. Part of the old bus barn was demolished with a large area of the building being repaired. Work was then begun on the old main garage building to turn it into the main building of museum.

Fireman washing Bldg 1999 Museum Photos 1 (1)